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手机版捕鱼游戏

时间:2020-05-31 12:11:39作者:Mckay

导语:在线领A片【AG88.SHOP】手机版捕鱼游戏Tex/t sizeAaAa】Dutch/ ad/ve\n【tu/rer Wiebe Wakker left the Nether】lands in an\ e】lect】ric car, the \B\lue Bandit\ \on\ the 15th of March 20/1【6 to /complete/【 th/e long/es】t \journey in an ele【ctric car ever【 recorded. His goal /w】as to sp/read /th】e world o/f sustainab/i【lity a\round the wor【ld, w】hile inspire, educat】【e\ an\d accelerate the t【ransition to a z\ero c\arb】on future. A beje/gyzés megt】eki【ntése /az Inst【agramonWiebe Wakker 】/ Plug Me In (@plugmeintravel) &a【ac】ute;【l\tal megosztott bejegyz&\eacute;【s, &A\ac】u\te\/;pr 7., 2019, időpont: 1:24 (\PDT idő\;zóna szerint)To bring about this mission he re【lied on the kindness and help of the p\eop【le around the glob/e, hence his/ in/itiation, called 'Plug Me/【 In', has /bec/ome th/e collaborati/on b\etween p】eople. Eventu】ally,\ those contributing by offering f\ood, accommodation or 】electricity, wer】e the ones choosing /the path that he ha/d to take. Hence,】 he was sent to Ita【ly via】 Germany and Switzerl/a\nd, after that to Sc【a/ndi【navia to eventuall\y \reach the Nort】h Cape and go \back south vi】a Russia, t】h【e Baltic States, Poland【 a【nd U\kraine.】 Followin】g that he hea\de】d to Iran and【 kept goin【g un【til Sydney, Au\stralia/.Cl】ick on th】e video abov【e to learn/ 【more abo\ut this adventure.Share this】 article More from places
手机版捕鱼游戏Italian ban o\n】 p\lastic cotton 【buds comes\ 【/into effectEu/ro\】pe ha【s a \plas【tic problem\, o【\nly 30% of plastic wa/ste is re/c【ycledSaving the Sey】che\ll/es: plas\t\i【c 【washes up \on sho】res/ hardly t【ouched b】y \m\ankind

At the s\troke of midnight on Tuesday, Italy said good\bye to c\otton bu】ds, as \the New Year ushe/red】 in 【the country\'s latest push to eliminate single\-use plastic produc】【ts./】Fro/m Ja【nuary 1, it is forbidd/en to/ \pr【\od\uce\ or 】\【sel【l /non-biodegradable or comp\ostable cotton buds.】/ Packaging will also h】ave【 to indicate 【the rule\s/ 【for proper 【di【sposal.Cotton buds account for\ about 9% of waste f【oun/d on 】Italian\ beac\h【e【s】 &/mda/sh; an average of about 60 sticks per beac/h.Italy is the fi【rst European Un【ion country to implement\ s【uch a ban but it won't be the last. In O/ctober, th/e European Parliament voted t\o o【utl】aw most/ si/ngle/-use plastics, start/ing【\ in 20/21.Next New Year's Day, Italy will\ bring i【n【 a\ ban on【 c【o\smetics cont/a【ining microplastics. T【hese are tiny plas【tics g】r】ai\ns found in some exf/oliants and】 detergents 【t\ha】t end \u【p in river】s \and seas, whe】re they are e\aten by fish【 an】d integrated into the【 food chain.Brussels has warned that by 2】050 th】ere wil/l be more 【plastic in th【e /oceans than fish, if nothing is done.Shar\e t/hi/s \articleShareTweetSha【resendShareT\wee【tShar【e【sendMoreHideShareSendSh【areSh\areShareSendShareShareYo/u might a\lso like 【 2/018 Review【: Single-】use plastics to be ban\ned \in EU 【 / 】 【 】 \ QUIZ: So you /think y\ou know about plastic pollution? Test your knowledge now / \ \ / Which Europea【】n countries are th【e \best and worst/ /at r【ec】y\clin\g plastic【 waste/? 】【 【 【 More aboutplasticMicroplasticsEn/vir】onm【【ental protection / Bro】wse tod【\ay's tags

COVID-19【: World ec\o\no/my in 2020 \to suffer \worst year since 1930s G/【reat \Dep】res】s【ion, says IMF【How to become a 【】more sustain\able\ me【at eater,见下图

【9;M/onster fa】tberg',\ bi【gger than the 【Tower of Pis】a, discov/【ered in D】evon /Synth\e【tic palm oil being brewed like【 beer gets B】ill Gates'【】;/ investment 【“The lo\nge/r the sup】ply 】chain, the m/ore 【is【 wasted/”How Western wi/ll Sa】udi Arab【ia go t\o【 attr】act tourists?Text si】zeAaAa\The top supermarket chain in Malaysia 】is\ prohi/biting the sale of anti-\palm 】produc】/ts, in an attempt to preserve its c\ontroversial key commo/dity.Mala/y】sia’s largest sup\ermarket, M【ydin, has today announ\ce】d a ban o【n 】any item that 【is labelled【 ‘p【alm】-oil-free&rsqu/o; a\s i/t believes this dam/ages the reputation /of palm oil produ/ction.\】 【The s\outh-e\ast Asian country is the secon【d largest】 pr\oducer of the oil】, after In】donesia. Th【e two 【neighbouri】ng nations produce a【【rou】nd 85% /of 【the world&rs】quo【【;s palm to【【【g】e/t/her, contrib【uting to a billion industry aroun】d the g\l/ob【e.\The supermarket's decision\ follows a 】lobbying offensive launched by】 the Malaysian government in 2018 to defen\d the p【alm oil】 \industry from becoming \obs/olete. \Af\ter【 a】 Washingt\on c\onsultancy present】ed a \paper likenin【g palm o】i\l to \tobacco, Ma【laysia stepped up its protectionist measures to en【sure the oil/ /【/does\ not become a “【pariah】 product”.Land that has been \clearedat an oil\ pal/m plantati】on in Johor, Mal】aysiaReu【tersDeclining to 】specify the amount o【f anti-pa\lm pr【oduct【s【 sold at his【 chain, Ameer Ali My【din, m【an】agi【ng\ direct】or of Mydin Mohame】d Holdings】 Bhd told reporters【 “we \must suppo】rt palm oil【/”. &ldquo/;By labelling something that there is no palm oil, you&r\sq/uo;re actually 】telling p/eople t\hat palm oil is bad for you”, h\e said, emphasising /the\ /impo\rtance of the ind【ust/ry to 【the\ Malaysian econo【my.Rela【ted |/ Estée Lau【der launches su\stain\able scheme to t】ackle 】palm oil productionTeresa Kok, Malaysia/&rsqu【o【;s minister o】f 【pr/i/m】ar【y indus/trie】s, agreed with the s\upermarket’s decision【 and encouraged othe/\r cha【ins 】in 【Malaysia to do the same/.Mydin's I\】nstagram account shared\ thi【】s video toda】y, promotin\g 'Kar】nival Saya\ngi Sawi】tku'\, tr】anslated【 as 'My Dear Palm Carnival' la【unched 】by\ minist】\er 【Tere\sa Kok hersel/f. Vie】w【 this post on In/stagramMenteri 【Ind】ustri U\tama, YB Puan Teresa \Kok mela\nca】rk】an K/【arnival 】Sayangi \Saw\itku di Pasar Raya MYDIN\ USJ\, Suban【g Jaya. Karnival Sayangi Sawitku adalah anjuran Ma/jlis Minyak Sawit Malaysia (MPOC), denga】n】 kerjasama MYDIN.. Karnival be【rmula da【r\i 5【 /】Sept hin\gga 【8// /Sep\t 2019. Jom】 ramai 】ram\ai memeriahkan/ lagi karnival ini‼️ . #mydinmalays\ia #mpoc】 #sayangi【【sawi】tkuA post shared by MYDI/N Malaysia \(@/mydi//nmalaysia) on Se】p 5】, /2019 at 2:/53a/m PDTIn response t【o the】 】n】ew/s, the Environme\ntal Jus\tice Founda/tion (EJF) spo\ke to Euronews Li】ving. "Banning \pa/lm-oil \free pr\】oducts is】 a re/t\r/ogra【de 】and p/oorly thought-out move that 【will co\st Mydin", said S/teve Trent, EJF's【 Executive\ Director. He went/ 】on to】 【say/ that /palm oil production causes "unwa】rran【ted】 and untena】ble destru【c【tion 【】of t】he rainforest" end【angering s】pe\cies. In Trent's own words, the expansion 【of pal【m oil estates "must /end now."Offering some adv\ice to the Ma/laysian chain of supermarkets, Trent conclude/d\:"Rat\her than refusing to sell palm-oil-f【ree products, Mydin should put a】l【l t】heir \effo【rt in to e/nsuring that any pa/lm oil they do\ s\ell i【s &】nd【ash; verifiably \– sustainable, legal】 and ethical. It must not lead to【 any more def\or【estatio\n. 】We need to see /t\ransparency and\ independent inspect/ions across the se\ctor\, from seed 【t【o supermar】\ket shelf."In\te\rnational/ appro】ach 】】to pal】m oil produ\ct【ionPalm oil is a vast industr/y, prese【nt in half 】】of a【【l\l s\u\permark】et products fro】m cosmetics and make up to froz\e/n pizzas, biscuits and margarine. It is the target of swathes of envi\ronmental act\ivi【sm due to deforestation, wh\ich destroy【s 【the natu【ral habit【at of 【man【y species like orangutans.Steps have been taken on an intern/ational level to boy/cott t】he industry. Earlier this y】ear】, the Eur/opean Union passe/d /a law to phase out pal【【m oil from renewable fue/l by 2030 and over 【250 organisati/ons con/d\emned the【 ‘g\re/enwas/hing’ of palm】 oil /as sustainable】,】 according to Rainforest Re\scue.In August,【 Mal】aysian\ Pr【ime Minis】ter Mahathir Moh/amad fou】g/ht back, claiming that the accusation pal\m oil was 】linked to defor\estation】 w】a【s\ “baseless, un】fair a【n/【】d unjustified.” H\e claims th\at【 the【 /industry is act】in\g “responsibly【&rdquo\; and shou【ld not be attac【ked【,// as it 】is contributing grea】tly to the so【cio-economic wel】l-b】e/ing of the Malaysian /people.S】/h】are this a】rticle \ / More from life。手机版捕鱼游戏

I/nside Bu\dapest's \green new campusEnvironmental】【ists' anger after Hung【ary cuts d【own EU-protected for\es\t】Du\bai an/d the United Arab Emir/a】tes are making anima\l con/se】\rvation a government priority at a time /when b】iodiversit\【y is unde】r threa\/t /and more anima】l】s fa【ce\ extinction globa/】l/ly.A re】port by the United Nations\ earlier this/ year claim\ed animal extinctio】ns are at an unpr/eced【en【t/ed high. Acco】rding【 to t\he organi】sa】ti\on, as many as one \m/illi【on species are under threat.On a visi\t to t【he 】desert, you/ 】might expect to f】ind ca/mels or】 antelope】, 【m】aybe \some /hawks.\ But Du】ba】i&rs\qu\o;s A】l Marmoom【 animal sanctuary 【】is/ teeming with 】biodiversi【ty with hundreds of differ【ent /species of】 birds, m【a/mmals, and rept【iles】.T【he sa/nctuary covers 20 percent of t】he whole area o/f Dubai. In the begin】ning, 】it\ was a desert popula\ted b/y nati\ve a【nimals, bu\t as the san\ctuar\y【 exp/anded \t】o m\ore than 50 oases, it was discovered/ these water bodi\es/ could cont【rol the environment【al b\alan/c\e.The sa\nctuary has even man】a/ged\ to at】tr【act the Arabian O】ryx. Thi】\【s an】i\mal w【as declared exti/n【ct in t【he w/ild in 1972, but has now been br】ought back from the\ b\r【ink by the reserve.Saoud F\aisal is a wildlife o\ffi/cer \at the】 Al Marmoom sanctuary. He says in the 80s an/d 90s the Oryx /wer】e o【verh\unted for food. Now t】he animal】 is cons\i【dered part o\f the r\egion's wildlife/】.&ld/quo;They are to/tally protected now/ an【d also they are he【althy,” he【 explains. “We have them in【 large numbers whic】h last year reached【 more tha【/n 500."From deser【t 【oases to in\door tropical environments, recent laws in Dubai mean gre/ater g】ove】rnment【al support for animal sanc/tuaries.Laws were introduced in 2007 to cover 【anima\l welfar\e, but awa【reness r】e/ally s】tart\ed\/ to build in 2016/. The laws /also apply to \rare and exotic animals.\ Some are /looked aft\】er in anim/al sanct/uaries like Green Pla/net.Everything about Gree【n Plane】t w】as de/si/gned specifically to 【create 】the ideal habitat for tropical 】p【lants】 a】nd a【n/imals in】 t】he mid】dle of the D】ubai de【ser【t】.The sanctuary house\s a wid【e range o【f /spe/cies including many diffe/rent birds, and ma\mmals such as two-toed】 slo\ths. And lizards l】ike gree/n/ iguanas or basi\lisks.The latest】 addition t/o /the Gree\n P】lanet family is a male Slow Loris /named/ Lo】nely by staff. But t【his wide- eyed, rare pr】imat\e wasn&【rsquo;t【】 lon】ely fo】\r long.As【 he is a critica/lly e】ndangered animal, the search was on to fin/d 【him a compan\ion, \A couple /of months later, a /female【 Slow Loris of the 【【same】 specie【s was also res/cued. These animals【\ mate for 【lif【e 【and\ af/ter they wer/】e int/roduced to each 【oth【e/r【 a【ppea【red to 】get along w/e】ll,【 】raising/ hopes there may 】be a baby Slow\ Loris/ in the near fut\ure.Sh\ar\e this articleCopy/paste the article 【vi】deo 【embed link below:CopyShar/eT\weetShares/e/ndShareTweetS】ha】resendMoreHi/deShareSe【ndSh】areShareShareSe/n【dShareShareYou might also【 like\ 【 【 The appeti/te for local sustainable 】food【 /produce in the Un】/ited Arab Emirates 【 【 】 / / \ \ Dubai acts t】o ste/m the tide of single use pl【astic \ \ 】 【 \ New era 】for Benidor\m as resort embraces sustainabi/lity / /】 / Mor【e aboutEnvir/onment/al prot【ecti/o\nFa\una and FloraD】ubai United Arab Emirates Most viewed Beijing is their cam【\pu/s/: Inside the 【Ch\/in\ese capita【l’s li/fe-c】hanging/ study tour】s \ 【 】 【 \ 9/ places to vi/sit on your cul\tural trip around\ Croatia / 】 The Palm Jumeirah: Dubai's sy【mbol of creati【vit】\/y and ambition 】 Marke【ts,/ coffee an/d stre\/e】t art: d【i\scovering Zagreb's secret delights 】 / Gr【eek is】lands of history and culture 】 \ 】【 Browse/ today's tags“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Text sizeA/aAaWh/en it comes/ to cr\ime re】porting, th【e med\i【a\&rsq/u\o;s /coverage is de【cid】edly 【human-fo】cus【ed. We tend to\ see re/p【orting on illega】【l drugs an【d weapons,\ but rarely 【on the expl\oit\ation of our 】natural resources, despit\e the fa/ct t\hat it \happen/s all over the globe a\n【d is a cri/mi】nal of/fe【】nce.【 The 【pro\blem is, environmenta\l crimes/ a】r】e hard to track and hard t【o prove.Arthur Par&eac\ute; is an envir\onmental crime/ rese/archer wh\o has ma】de it his life&rsquo【;s\ aim to co/me up with solut\ions【 to ensure pe】/rpet\rators /are】【 held accountable. Having/ grown up in Cost】a Rica, he spe】nt his c【hi/ldhood immerse【d in 】n\atur\e, and afte/r a fi】rst 【career in t\echnology and in【vestigating /money【 la】\undering/, /he de【cided\ to focus on what/ he knew best &ndash【/; preven/tin】g the d【estruction of o【\ur natural world.“I 】li【ved on the b【e/ach,/ g】oing surfing a【nd hiking /ev\er\y day,&/rdquo; he says. “Mov\ing to the urban streets of 【Paris \was a shock.&rdquo【\;Alongside a team o\f environment【al \lawyers at G&】】ea/cute;os/mi【ne/ in Pa【ris,【 Par&eacu\te; works to【 ex\pos\e c/rimes such as illegal w】ildlife// t【rade, res/ource extraction and pollution. H/is technical adv\【【isors c【onduct criminal analysis and investigations us\ing economic, huma\n and cyber int】el【ligence.【 The data they share can\ then be【 u】s】ed】 in ecological s【tudies or by the 【media to increa\se public \awar【en【e\/ss.The 】map gi\vin\g a\ 【vo/i】ce to the v/oi【】ce/le/ssParé’s latest feat is a tool called the Eco Crim/e Map, which【 allo【ws 】【an【o】】nymous】 users to \/repo/rt environmental crimes from wh/er】ever th/ey are in the worl】d. I/n many /countri】e\s, fear/ of politi\cal ret】aliation【 prevents victims and witnesses from 】repor【ting c【rimes to the\ author】ities. Hence, a map w/hich tracks eco crime in 【【real ti\me cou\ld 】change the way c】orru/ption is dealt with, by dr\awi\ng 【【a【ttenti【】on to c【rimin【/al trade routes. So f\ar - 178 crimes have been sha/red.&ldqu】【o;The g】oal is 】to】 ce\ntralise data related to envir】o/nmental cr】imes,【 o【btai】n information to comp】\are op\erating modes/ with other illicit indu】/stries 】and finally, to give a secure voice/ to the【 vi】ctims and witness\es of these c【rimes wit】hout ri】sk of reprisal】s,” /Par&eac】ute;】 tells Eu】ronews Living, pointing to t\】he map bel】ow..embed-container {position: re【lative; padding-bottom: 80%; height: 0; max-】【wid/th: 100%;} .embed-container iframe, .embed-c\ontainer object, .embed-c/ontainer iframe{posi/【【】tion: a【b【s/olute【; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100/%; he】ight:】 100%;} small{posit/ion: 】ab/solute; z-index: 40; bottom: /0; margin-bottom: -/15px;}Agrandir la carteRed is 】poac】h】in/\gOrange is pollu/tionGreen is illegal ext【raction\B/\lue is an/imal\ traffick/ingYello/w is】 s】anitaryPurpl【e is illegal loggin】gIf \an on】line i/nventory exists 【at t/he】 click /of a butt【on, Par&e\acute; hopes journal/ists, NGOs an】】【d authorities can make \use of the data and ex】pose the frigh/t【ening volume of crime/s committed.Fundamentally, it is a】 t\ool designed to allow any【one 【to sha【re, testify o【r rela/】y infor\mation that affects a territor/y, pop/ulation or animal and\ plant 】species】. \T/he information is 100% enc\rypted for s【a】fety reasons.Is being able to \rep【ort th【e【 crimes/ 】en\ough?Dr. Em\anuel【a Orlando, 【lecturer in Environmen】tal 】Law at the Univers】ity o\f Su\ssex, calls the map an “interesting initiative” saying it will potentially b【e able to address one of the】 main\ pro】blems wi【th e】co crime. “M【ost of these illegal co】nducts causi【ng h\arm【 to the/ environment are often 】【not detected by police and other l【aw en\forcemen\t agenci】es.” She adds, “indeed/, th/e/s】\e i\llegal ac【/tivi/ties te/nd to affect the most vulnerable sectors of the /society,\ su【ch as 】women or \/mino/rity communities in the poorest reg/ions.】”For /Dr. O/rl】ando, w\hile providing the】 voic\【eless with the protect】i】on of【 anonymity is \“welcome and shoul\【d/ be widely /publicised," she emphasises that】 reporting is 】only the first s/t/e\p of ma】n】y.\ &ld/quo;Environmental cri】me【s【 ar】e a qui】te complex issue, particu\l【arly when this is linked to org】anised crime.”S【he conclu\des/, &ldquo//;for】 these typ/es o/【f crimes, an effective strategy needs to rely on a strong enf\orcement /sy】stem” and in】stituti】ona/l framewo】rk to pr【operly ad\dress the corrup【tion.How many/ billi】\on\s is】 the environmenta/l crime industry wor【th?Acco/rd【ing to Europo/l/, the Eur\opean Union&rsquo/;s law enforcement agency, the 【/annual 【va/lue of tran\snati【onal\ environm/ental crime】 is】 esti【mate/d t\o be worth &\e\ur\o;63 to 192 billi】on euros annu】a】lly. In fa\ct, /en【vironmenta/l crime can/ be as pro】fitable【 as i】llegal dru【g trafficking, but the sanction】s】/ are m/】uch lower, an/d it i\s hard/\er to de】tect. These fa【ctors make it highl】】y a/ttractive for or/ganised crime groups.G&】eac】u【te;osmine calls it “/t/he most l/uc【rat\ive but least repr】essed illicit】 industry i\n the world.&rdq【uo; 【Group】【s are 【known to orchest\rate fake c】ons\【e\【rvation programmes, 】for examp\le, that waste m】illions of dollars in the process.“D/on’t b】uy pets online,” Par&eacut【e;/ /wa\】rns. “Often dogs and cats are being tra】ffic】\k】ed】 il\legally】 】and/ have been【 used for animal \testing.” Th/ere is/ /e/ven a \new industry emerg/in】g called cyber poac】hing. “This is a new me\thod of smuggl/ing which/ takes place on social medi\a and marketplaces like /Ebay or Amazon, \where iv/ory a【nd rhi/no ho/rns are being sold.”\The reason thes【e crimes a/re】 too o【ften ignored comes 】down /to fear of/ “blackmail a【nd pressure.”Phot\os took on a/ mission fo】r tigers parts traffic/king in Europe. The fangs here\/ were sold /K eachArth】u/r ParéIs environme\ntal crime \the s/ame as eco/cide?All over the world, laws are in p/lace to prevent envi\ronmental c\rimes from posing thre\】ats /to our everyday lives. From the dum//pi\ng of /\hazardous waste, to overfishi【ng/ a protec/ted speci/es or ivory\ \traf/ficking.By co\ntrast, ecocid【e is all/ ab【out /creating a legal dut/y of\ care for life \on ear】th【. It is the \ca\ll for the envir\onmen】t to be given rights, much li【ke humans, and/ was borne out【 of the disregard for rising 】sea levels and global war\ming】 ar【ound the world.Th\e St】op Ecocide 】campaign w【as \steered by barrister】 Polly Higgins, who died in Apri【l 】201【【9, and has /since been/ led by environmental a【ctivist 】Jojo Meht】a and others.If legally\ implemente/d, ecocide would】 mean that any hu】man activi/ty causing extens/ive d/amage t\o ecosystem【s 【or harmin【g th】e wellbeing of a species would become a crim【inal offense. This would mak】e chi【ef 】executives【 and government ministers, who commission\ /the destruction of the natural /wor\ld, criminal/ly liable】.Thus far, it has not yet been accepted as an int【erna】tiona】l crime\ by 】the United Nations.Unlike the il】l】egal \trade in drugs and other illicit goods, &ld】quo;natural resources are finite a】nd\ cannot 【b】e replenished in a l\ab,” 】stat【es Int\erpol【. 】“As such, there is a sense o\f】 urgency to comb\at en\vironmental c】rime.”The \Eco Crime Map is curr\ently crowdfunded and in search of sponsors to \sta【y afloat. Curre】ntly, it is av】ailable in English, Spanish and French/ an/d can be separated into six categ/ories】: po\aching, illegal extr【a\ctio/n,】 sa【nitary, pollut\ion, animal trafficking and illegal logging.Share this articl/e 【 More from life 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsNigerian women revolutionising Fine Art 【。手机版捕鱼游戏

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