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送彩金💰AG88.SHOP💰捕鱼网站Text sizeAaAaJames Bo/nd actor】 J\avier Bardem has tak\】e/n to t【he streets of New York’s Tim】es Square【 to demand gre【】ate】r protection fo\r】 the worl【d’s oceans 【】ahead【【 of a mee/ting with th】e U/nite】d Nat\ions.The Oscar winner gave an 【imp/assioned spee】ch,\ \call/ing on deleg】ates at the U【N/ Convention on the Law \】of the Sea to agr\ee ta\rgets and give the green【 light to a Gl/obal Oce【ans Treaty./ Su\【ch an agreement /would increase the 】amount of international\ waters\ granted environmen/tal protection from 1% to 30% 】by【 2030.Bardem/ became an activ】ist with Gre/en【peace, focu【sin/g on】 p/rotection/ for An】tarctica at the//【 beginnin\g of\ last year.“The \ocean and its /inhabitants know no bou/ndaries. What ha】ppens in the /hig/h s/eas【, do/\e/sn&rsquo【;t stay /there. Whales, 【\turtles and fish don&rsquo/;t know our bo【r/ders/,&rdqu【o; Bard】em told【 the ass】em】bled media in Time\s 】Square.“They are a【ll co\nnected, and we 】are 】conne/ct\ed \to them.\ Our oce\ans are on the ve\rge of【 collapse and we】 have/\ all p/layed \a huge role in this. Now we mus/t all play\ our part to stop it by securing a st【ron】g Glob【al Ocean【 T【rea】ty.”Bard\em also 】pose/d for pi】ctur\【es alongside a ne】arly 6-metr/e tall【 sculptu\re of w】hales and turtles erec/】ted by Gr/ee】npeac【e outs【i【de N【ew York&【r【squo;s UN【 building. The artwork \rep\resented man】y of the threa】ts【 t/o】 mar】ine】 life from p/l/a\stic pollution to oil drilling, said the env/ironment charity.Threat of【 extinctio】nThi】s f\res【h pus】h【 for【 a Global Oceans Treaty】 comes after the Global Biodiversity Assess】ment Report found more tha\【n /a t/h\ir/d of marine mammals an\d shark speci【es are currently facing t\he threat o【f exti\nction. 】Gr【eenpea/ce has been\ campaigning/【 for th【e policy for more a decade, counting celebrities including Big Little \Lies\ star Shailene Woodley as】【 support\ers\.“Our o【ceans are in cr】isis and existing 【frame\work【s 】for safegu】【arding t【hem are inadequat【e. /Only 1% \of in【ter【national waters, which co】ver almost half the planet, are effecti】vely/ prote【ct/ed,” sa/id Will M\cCallum, Greenpeace o】ceans cam/pa【ign】er.The sculpture installed by Greenpeace depicts tu/rtles】 a/nd whales/ trapped in ghost gear©\【; Stephanie】 Ke【ith / Gr】eenpeace&ldquo【;Restorin】g the【 health of our oceans i\s critical in pre\】serving ma\rine life, tackling the clima/te crisis, and sustaining the lives and li\vel\ihoods of millio【ns of】 people who depend on them. A str】on】g Global Oc\ean \Treaty w/ill pave【 the way for a /【net】work of s】anct\uaries tha\t will p【lace at least a third】 o】f the【 world&rsquo】】;s oceans off-limit【s to hum/an activities.”Dr Essam Yassin Mohammed of t】he\ In/ternation\al Institute for Env\i】ronme】nt and Development said i/t was【 &l\dquo;/surprising&r】dquo; no such /laws were alread【y in effect, su\g】gesti【ng the/ 】n\【ew treaty s/hould pre\vent unsustainable fishing and ensure pari【ty 【of access for developing countries.&ld/quo;Th【e equi】table distributi】o】n of /conse】rvat\ion benefi【ts of /the high seas shou/ld \also be【 at 【the core of the negotiatio/ns. Any ne】w global agreement must ensure that /】de】sign/ated protec】ted ar【e【as consi\de】r h\ow to sup【port coastal communities ac\ross the developing world.”Share this a/rticle 【 More from lifeText siz】eAaAaThese days, paying to \plan/t trees or inves】ting in g/reen projects as】 a way 】to balan\ce out your carbon emissions is a pretty stan\dard method o】f easing your en【vironm【ental conscienc】e. K/nown as car【bon offsettin\g, the process /has spawned a thriving business 】mak/i\ng billions of euros every year as com【panie【s /trade c】\a/】r【\bon credit\s to reach cli\mate c/hange g\oals.Yo/u can 】now even 】offset to und/o you\r own 】personal envi\r】onmenta\l damage, with a\irlines and organisat【ions offering /to he/lp you tak/e full resp【onsibi】l【ity】 for yo/ur 【residual emissions. For/ a small fee, o【/f \c/】\ourse. I【ncreasingly, however【, this s/ustain/ability】【 sol】u\t】io\n has come under】 fi【r】e from activists as being 】little\ more than/ gr【ee/n【washing. Criti【c/s have comp【ared【 \it to the practice of/ selli【ng indulgences\ /in the ancient Ca\tholic church; you can live\ h/ow】 you want as】 long as y【ou ha【ve the money/ to buy】 off your sins.What if, ins】tead of ma】king environmental protect【ion a side \issue, busine】ss】es made the\se 】kinds of carbon-】absorbing p/rojects a part\ of the new no【rmal/?Restoring biodiv】e\rsi【tyTi/】lmann/ Silbe】r, director 】of/ sustainable supp【ly\ chains】 for enviro/nmental expert, South P/ol】e, di【scus】ses how imp/\ortant a completely new approach c/ould】 be in allowi【ng b/【rands to show they/ are seriou【s abou\t fighting climate c/h/ang\e.“In/setting is derived from o/ffsetting【, as the name suggests,&rdquo】; Silber ex【plains. Wh/ere】 offsetting【 works to outso\urce to part】n】er 】\/organis】ations, insetting finds【\ ways to add/ /carbon miti/gating enterprises into t】he process of producing the product. “They would/ be looking for【 pr【ojects i\n or 【】close to their 】/supply 】\chain.”Convent】ional car【bon neutralising usuall【y i\nvolves investing in】 projects u\nre/lat\ed\ to【 produc】ts, b\ut insetting instead addr/e】sses a company’s balance wi\th \the\ ecosystem directly. B\urberry】, for\ example, recently announ【ced th/at it wou【ld b/e /partnering with PUR Projet 【to improve carbon ca/】ptur【e on farms run by their wool \producers 】in Australia. Restorin】g the biod】iversi\ty of these 】habitat/s helps cap/ture CO2 from the atmosphe【re /but also ensures th\e future of the land】scape.Where off】setting is re【active, makin】g changes】 internally is i/nte\n【ded【 to anticipate potent】ial negative s【oc【ial and env\ironmen【tal im\pacts before /they even happen. Ultima/tely the goa【l is to provid】/e a net p】osi\tive outcome.Burbe【/rry is helping to restore biodiversity fo】r】【 sheep farmer/s】 i/n Australia.U/nsplash【Is our addiction to Spotify ruini/n】g the planet? The【 environme/ntal \cost of st】reaming is\ invisi/bleS】yntheti】c palm oil bei【ng b】rewed 】like beer gets Bill Gates' inv【estm】entScie/ntists have work\e\d out \how to generate 】elect/ri/city fro/\m th【【in 【/airMak/i【ng important investmentsInsetting c/an be expensive to set u\p, but t】here is a range o】f/ benefits beyond\ purely financial【 rew/ards. “It improves【 /the resilience【 of the \supply \chain by investing/ w】her\e it is most vulnerable,&r【dquo; Silber says.\ Farmers and w【or【kers 【in areas where compa\nies set up p【rojects like this end up w】\ith greater security in thei【r/ i\】ncom】e, less/【 environmental po/llution, and【 regeneration o【f the ecosystem tha\t they rely on to \live.Bu【t big bu/si/nesses \have to work t【ogether with th\e people that\ g】row their material【s, to make s【【ure that these changes actually w/ork. &l】d】q【uo;There ha/s to be 【a p【artnership ap/proach, it’s not sust【ainable】【 to force farmers to make changes\,” explains Silber./ &ldqu/o;It’s not e\no】ugh to just make \it financ\ially\ attractive in the shor\t-ter【m, that m/eans a farmer sig】ns up for 5 to 【10 \years and【 the】】n stops doing it.”Feedback fro\m co【mmun/ities i/s essential【 to ensur\i/ng that i/nsetting is su】ccessf】ul.\ Unsustai【nab【le practice/s ca\】n【 be ex\ploitative 】and d/amagin/g to loc【a【l e\cosystems,【 pre【venting/ farmers \fr/om being \abl】e to ensure a secure income long-term. Making sure t【hat people feel they are being liste】ned t【o encou【rages th/em to\ continue\ fa【rming and pass on skills to future\ ge/n\erations. A positive mo【ve for local/ farmers, workers and for t【h/【e co\mpanie】】s employing them.So】 how cent/ral is ins【etting to a net】-zero future?】 】Silbe/r 】thinks it is definite】ly b【ecoming m/or//e】 mainst【rea\m, /whi】ch i/s good for e\miss/i【ons goals, b【ut it’\s risky and may\ not be possible for every】body. “Not 】everybody can move at the s/ame pa\ce wh【ich m/eans 】offsettin【g is still important,” he says. Technical skills f【rom more con/ven【tional emissions projects】 are also essential a】nd mea/n \th//at busine\sses end】 up working with many of the same /partners th】ey were bef/o\【re.Carbon i\nse【tting is about more th】an just \tree planting.Lukas\ Rodr/iguez/ PexelsIs inset\ting \just ano】ther way to plant trees?】Planting trees is just one way of b\ringing carbon】 emission absorbi\ng practices【 i/nto th【e su】pply chain. The idea/ could expand to include be/tter recycling facilitie/s, i/nves/ting 【in\【 energy ef/】ficiency o】r even projects impr/oving commuting 【options for employ\ees, a 】】paper\ by 】Eco\metrica\ sug\ges【ts. The【】se kind/s 】o【f changes a【/re lik】ely 【to b\e【 a lot】 \easier and cheaper to achie/ve,】 mak\ing them appealing to businesses /looki/ng t】o communicate their green crede/ntials.Often a ris/ky and expensive investmen【t/, however,】 \it 【could be a【 long】/ time be】fore re\gener/a【tive environ】men/tal projects become mainstream. In the near 】future\, buying a/bsolution by asking a company to offset your emis/si【ons will pro【ba/bly remain the approach for most. Ecometrica re】ckons tha】t thanks\ to the fact t\hat the/y become a part of 】the way a product/ is made,\ carbon inse\】tt【i\ng pr【ojects ar/e likely t】o be a better bet for\ 】sustainability in the】 lo/ng-term.Share this article More from lifeNigerian women revolutionising Fine Art 【Tex/t sizeAaAaOn【e in four workers】 would take a pay cut to /do/ w】ork that&rsquo\;s bett】er \fo】r the envir/onment, a】ccor/din】g to new【 re【search 【by【/ careers sit【e Totaljobs. That figu/re rises t【o half among millennials, aged\ 23-38.】Al\so known as Generation Z, mi【llennials told res】earchers they’】d be wi【lling t【o /drop &pou\nd;11,0 from their 【salaries o】n average【. That compare\s to £3,800 \Genera【tion X respond】ents【 aged b】etween 39-54 said they’d be willing/ to forgo for a g/reener j】ob role.In the UK, the\ surv【ey found 60% of j【obs】eekers resear\ched a potent/ial\ employe】r’/s sustainabilit\y and 】environme】nt cr\edentia/ls before/ accepting a positio】n. M\eanwhile, \f\our in every five empl【oyees【\ though\t comp\anies had/ a re【spons【ibility to lo\o/k after /the【 environment,【 with thre【e\ in【 f】ive agreeing their employers should be /【do】ing more.Read more | Noughti\e/s\ rap legend Akon to build gre/en cityA\roun/d th/e same amou/nt were\ willing to accept cuts in sp】【ending on activitie\s like team lunche\s, furniture an【d events.Environment\ attitudes inspi/red by David Att】enb/orough an\d Greta ThunbergSome 18% of wo【rkers/ in g\en/eral an/d 34% mi/llennial【s reported\ that they \would refu/se t【o work for a company 】they thought wa\s har】ming the natural world. The majority said they w】ere m/ore interest【ed in cl\imate issues】\【 than t】\hey wer\e five years ag\o, sayi【n/g a hig/her profi【le【 in the\ /media ha\d drawn【 their attenti【on.Greta Th\unberg】 arrives \in Spain for】 COP 25Copyrigh\t 2019 \The Associated Press.】 All r/ights reservedPedr【o RochaT\he influen【ce of n/at\ural】ist a\nd broadcaster Sir【 David Attenb【orough and young ac【tiv】ist G【reta Th/unberg were 】also cited as key drive/rs for pe】opl【e to\ cut their carbon footprint.“It has ne\ver bee【n more \i/mportant f/\or busi【nesses to be 【par\t of th】e solution to 【our pl】anetary /c【rises,” said Gudrun \C/artwright, envi【ronment d\irector 】at Bus】iness i【n the Community.【&ldquo/;Young people are no 】long】er begging leaders 】to 】change but tell】ing them /that cha/nge is comi\ng re\gardles【s. Businesses that i】gno】re\ it /face an imminent\ exis\te】ntial threat. Our futures depend on \rapid,【 】ambit/ious action, and we can all make a differen【ce.”Sh【are this article More from li\feOne of Greece&rsquo\;s 】【most】 popular tourist d\esti/n\atio/】ns is at risk of ecological and economical disaster as drilling【 companie\s pr\epar】e 】to exploit /thou【sands of kilometres of】 \la/nd, the World Wide Fund for N\atu\re【 (WWF) has】 w】arned.The Gre/ek government has allocated/\ 17/,000 square kilometr【es of Zakynthos to o】il/ c\【ompanies, leadi【ng to activi//sts to 【warn of t【he potential effects drilling fo【r o/il and gas could have.&l/dquo;A】bou】】t a third 【of \】the GDP of the Ionian islands comes from tourism. S】o,【 im/ag【ine t/he scenario【 【of a/ minor】】 or greater【 oil accident and what d【oes that】 mean f【or these is】l/ands】,&rdquo】; said De】】mitres】 Karavellas, t/he\ /direc/\tor-gener/al of WWF Greece.To 【hel】p 【raise awa\reness of the issue, the【 WWF France /sailing boat ‘Bl】ue Panda’ is tra/\vel】ling【/ the Ionian Sea, informing 【islanders at destinations such as Zante, Itha\/ca and K/【e\falonia about the problem.WWF is particularly concerned about the protecti/【on/ of \the loggerhe】ad turtl【e.S/hare this articleCopy/paste the article video embe】\d link below:CopyShar/eTwe【e\tSharesend/ShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSen\dShareS】hareShareSe/ndSh/areShareYou mi/g/ht also like/ \ / Europe \acc【used of 'turning a b【li\nd eye' to risk /of corona【virus in migrant camps / 】 Greece use【s】 state TV to\【 teach sc】hool children during coronavi】rus loc/kdown \ \ \ / 【 / Migrants arriving in Greece 】say the】y have no pr\otection again\st coronavirus \ 【 Mo【re aboutGreeceEcologica【l【【 cris/is//WWFEnviron/men【tal prote【ctionNa【tur【al\ 】gasOil 【market Brow\se to/day/'】s tags

To【r\re Guaceto, a】n eight-kilometre long stretch of coastli【ne north-west of Brindisi, used to be【 know/n as a centre for poor fishing practic\es, black market smuggling and /a drop-off point 【for illegal immi\gration.Now it's famous around t【he world for the【 way 】it's t【ransf/ormed itsel】f.The coast i【s n】ow a\ p\rotected mar【ine 【re\serve and s【trict】 rules are in /place so that /tourism\ and fishin/g don’t】 har】m the nat\ural env\ironment.The【 European Uni】on】 h\as comm\itted to se\t aside 10 per ce/nt o【f【 all i】ts waters as 】marine protecte【d\ ar\eas by 2020. This targ/et was met two y】ears before the d//eadline. Today, 62】5,000 squa【re kilometre/s of marine and coastal waters in Europe are protected, which 【is 【expected to bring【 m/ore than 3 billion euros of annual benefits.In/ 2/001, Torre Guaceto imposed a 【/five-yea/r ban 【on f/ishi】ng to rebui【\ld the ca/\tastrophic\all【y declining s/tocks. To】day, a fe\w loc【als/ are permitted to fish fo\r j】ust one day a wee/k, usin】\g n】ets that c】an’t catch】 small fish.Fisherma【n Cosimo De Bi\asi to【ld 】Ocean/: 】【“Be/\f】】ore the r/eserve w【as\ /establish/ed, this 】whole area was rife 【with dyna】mite fish/i】ng/, cigaret【\te【 smuggling and illegal immigr】a/nts. Today, thanks to /the p【r\otected area, all we can see here is th】e pristine sea.”The protecte【d area is man\aged by【 a consortium \that represents【 local communities and/ the/ World Wide Fu【nd for Natur】e, th】e// WWF.It enf/orces the rul】es that have【 been \agreed with \the fish\ermen. Th【at \includes monitoring the\/ir catches to ma\k【e su/re that the pr】otection e】ffor\【ts are 【effective.And the fishermen are happy with【 the new controls on what t/\hey catch.“When we ca\t】ch a big fish an\d brin/g i\t ashore, we can sell【 it n【ot for f/\ive eur/o/】s, but for】 /20 【to 25 euros,&r】【dquo; De Biasi said.Francesco \de Franco, head of t【he envir\onmental an【d technical unit at the Torre Guaceto con\sortium, said fish stocks h\a】ve recovered in the marine reser\ve.&l】dquo;O【utside the protect\ed area, the levels of\ fish /rem\ain basically the same】 as in the past. And in\s】ide this are\a, the \fis/h /s】tocks have rough【ly doubled,\" h】e \said.Wider be/nefitsAnd /it’s no】t just the sea that&rsquo\;s【 being protected. The dunes and we【t【lands along t】he/ coas\tline are a precious stop-off point for migratory bi/rds】 and a perman【【ent 】home to m/any l/ocal /spec】【ies.\The Torre /Guaceto area, named after its 】centuries-ol\d watchtowe】r, is patrolled day \】and ni】ght by the coast guard and 】the police. They】 【say most danger toda【y comes【【 from careless visito【rs w\ho might pick plants or damage coral\ near the shor\e.To/urists\ who re/spect the environment are welcome).In the p【ast, these sandy beaches were 【f\ull of litter and overcrowded. 】】Cleaning up the area, 】introdu\c】ing 】guided t/our\s and【 l\imiting car a】ccess\ made a 】big diff【erence: now, 【in peak】 season,/ Torre Guaceto /gets】 visited /by 5000-6000/ tourists a day.Mimmo Miccoli fro】m Bres/cia has been visiting for years.&ldq\uo;This /place used to be a m】ess, wi】th/\ cars parked every/where,"\ /he told Oce】an. "Now, all the cars have to /be l/eft in the car /pa【r【【k at th\e\ top of t\he roa\d /—【 /】so the pl】ace is 【no/w much 【nice/r, cl/eaner\.”The \f\low of tourist\s 【also bene【fi【ts businesses that have embraced the】 t\rend for sust/ainability.Ma】ria\ Lanz【il/otti 【runs a restaur/ant in nearby Car/ovigno which s/pe\cial【【ises in lo【ca【l orga/nic cu\isin】e.&l【dquo;We always/ have fresh, good, healthy fish from the se【a," /she said. "And ou】r lan】d produces lo/ca/l toma/toes and so on, so it is very import【ant \for me and for all of us restaurateurs /to have this natural \【res【erve — it’s our marvel!&rdquo/;Backed by European f\unds, o/ne-thi【rd of 】local farms have n\o/w conve\【rted to【 organic productio/n, boos】ti【ng 【the【ir sales by associati/ng their brand【s with the n】ow fam\ous Torr】e Guaceto pr\otected【 area.E】stablished to preserve the environment, this marine protected ar【/ea became an attractive/ ec\o-】tourism destinat】ion with a/ sus/tainabl】e econ\omy &mdas\h; a success story th】a】t\ expert/s say should serv/e an example to othe】r places 】like Torre Gua/ceto/.Ni】co】lò Carnimeo, 【vice-presid【ent of the Torr】e Guaceto mana【gement consortium, \s/ai】d:【 “I \would\ say【 t】hat protecting 10 per cent of 【Eur【ope’s waters is st\ill not eno【ugh — we sho\uld go further, keepi】ng in mind the s/o-called /circ】ul】ar eco】nomy, l\ike wh\at we ha【ve he\re. Thi/s does work, and I would say thi】s is how i【【t should be d】one in other mar【ine protecte】【d areas 】too.&r【dquo;1212121212【/1212Sha/re thi】s articleCopy/p】ast/e the article video embed link】 below【【:CopyS【ha】re\TweetSh\ar【esen/dShar/eTweetS\haresendMoreHid/eShareSendShareShareShareSendSha【reShareYo/u might al【so lik\e 】 / \ Sea ch/an/ge: how 】one 】small】 stretch of coastline in Italy tr】ansfo】rmed itself 】 /【 More aboutEnviro【nm】ental protec【【tionFauna and FloraFisherySea 【 \ \ Most /】v【iewed 【\ \ 】 What in/fluence/ on c【li【mate】】 【is \th\e coronavir】\us】 lockdo\wn r【eally having? 【 / / 【 \ 【【 】 The new AI system sa】feguarding premature ba】bies \from infectio】n 】 \ Messen】ger R】】NA: the molecule that may te【ac/h our bodies to beat cancer / 】 Apple and 】【G\oogle say they'll work together to tra/】c\e spr【ead of c/oronavirus via【 smartphones 【 / / / How】 EU fun\d【ing is【 changing/ t】he face o\f Latv/ian innovation/】 / \ 【 / 【 Brow【se today'/s tagsHow to make your start-up busi/ness sus\tainable from day oneRoc【k star 】pol\i【tics 】in Romania

Text sizeAaA【aIt /may be quite some time /until t/he fast-fashion industry c【o/\m/ple【te】ly slow/s 】do/wn, but wit【h new trends\ being set in motion, 【/th/ere is now hope /t】hat 'slow fashi】o】n'】 i\s a【 trend gat/hering trac】tion.T/he demand for 'cool',/ affordable】 clothing/ is h\ard 【to keep up with, with clothes bei】ng/ d【el【】ivered /in bulk i\nt】o highstreet shops\ t\o try 【and match ret/ail expectation/s. But more often than\ not/, they come with a high en】vironment\al pri\ce tag in t/he long term;/ the f/】ashion indus】try\ is the second bigg【est polluter in the 【worl【d, o\nly second to oi/l.A glo【b】al movement called Fashion R】evolut/ion /who are campaign】ing for sustain】a\bility and greater transparency in th\e fashion【 supply chain, have just released their latest report. Known 【】as【 the Fashio\n \Tr\ansparency In】dex, the repo\rt 】scores over 20】0 major【 global【 brands on how su【stainable their manufacturin//g pro/ces/s /is. /As pr】edi】cted, the a\verage score 】is only 21%, indicat】ing that there 【is s\til/l】 a considerable way to go in improving w【or/king c【onditions, hum【an rights and d【ecreasin/g the\ environmental impact of production.\ This rele/ase of /fi】gures c【oincides with the 】s/ixth】 anni/versary of the devastating Rana /】Plaza garment factory collapse 【\in Banglades\h, where /more tha/n /1000\ workers d】ied and aro\und 2,5Sea/ life at 】risk if EU count】ries don't a【chieve/ marine protection 【goa\ls we/re injur】ed. The tragic factory disaster was】 the first 】to really t/rig【ger alarm \bells on a g/lo】ba】l scale, rais/ing awareness about the deadly co【st of fast】】 fashion and th】e frankly inhumane working【】 conditions【/ in 【garment factories. \ C\lick on】 th【e video above to see learn mo\/【re abo】ut this report.S【hare this article More from st【yleHow to have a fl\ying free holida\y and】 【reconnect wi/th natur】eMEPs ba/ck initiati\ve to reduce p/lastic waste a\n\d improve water quality

When art/】 is a force for goodSaving the Sey】che\ll/es: plas\t\i【c 【washes up \on sho】res/ hardly t【ouched b】y \m\ankindText 】s/izeAaAaAfter more tha\n a week of \protests a】round London,【 the cap/ital&rsq【/uo;s】 police force has rescinded its permissions f/or \E/x【tinction Rebel/lio/n to /pro/te\st in the UK cap/i【tal.Re/bels had pr【evio\usly /been campin/g a【t locations around Lon【don, wi】th\ a base camp\ established under the Nels/on’s C】olumn in Trafalgar S【qu/are.Traffic a/round Trafalgar Square was rerout/ed l】ast week af】ter p/\rotestors took t\o the streets,】 bl【ocking roads in a bid to ra【ise aw/a/r/eness on cli】mate change. They were calling on th/ose in pow】e/r to ta【ke immedia\te climate action, i/ncl/uding expeditin\g the【 process of beco【ming car\bon neutral.The\ Metropolitan Po【lice c/【/ited 【the 1,445 arrests】 it had made - including that of 】a 75 y/】\ear old - alongside prote/sts disru\p【/tin/g tra\vel and\ busines\s in the 】City of Lond/on 【as reasons for cl\amping down on 】the protest.“These conditions hav【e been imposed 】/due】 】t【o th】e continue/d breaches o\f the s\ection 14 【condition previ/ously imp【lemented, and ongoing serious \disruption to the community,&rdq/uo; Depu【ty【 \/Assi/stant Commissioner Laur/ence Taylor said i/n the announ\cement.&/ldquo;】We h】ave made【 s//ignific\ant progress in\ managing】 】Ext/inc】ti\on R/ebellion’s activity/】 at sites across【 central London over this】 past\ week. Officers have b\eg\un the process of clearing Trafalga/r Square a/nd getting things back to normal,” he added.Extinction Rebellion co/nfirme/d/ it would relinquish Traf/alga【r /Square to authorities but in a 【statem】ent said:】 “The Internationa】l Rebell】ion conti【n/ues.”&ldqu】o;Th【e Cli\m】ate and Ecological Emergency isn&rsq\uo;t going away and we rema【in【 re/solut【e in f\acing i\t】,&rdq/uo; th\e statement contin/ues.&ldq\【uo】;We /urge the Gover/nment an/d the authorities to join us in doing the same. We【/ /cann】ot do it】 alone.”Howe】ver】, \in a Tweet, the activism gr】o【up admitted it broke the law &\ldquo【;\【in careful &】 deliberate way\s, fully un\derstanding \the\ /conse/quences of action b】eing tak】en”.It wen】【t on\: &/ldquo;/】Today,【 an unprece【dente】d, poli【tical\, de\cisio\n has been taken t【o shu/t down pe\ac/efu\l prote/st \call【ing out t/he gover\n/ment fo\r inaction in the f\ace of cris/is./&rdq【uo;Reactions in the T/witterverseMany of those pr【otesting took to socia\l media\ 【to\ highlight their fury at the decision to end the protest a w/eek early.Share this article 】 More from places

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MEPs backed p\la\ns on Wednesday\ aimed【 a】t improving /【the qua\lity \of drink】ing water and reduce pla】stic waste.T/he initiativ【e incl】udes】 p/roposals t\o sl【/ash the maximum limit\s of certain poll\utants and inc/rease access\ to\ free and safe wa】ter in public spaces across the EU.One \of the p\【rimary 【goals/ is to【 increase publ】ic trust in tap water with the intenti【on of dim\ini【shing the use 】】of /plasti\c w\ater bottles. Singl【e-use plas【tics/ are currentl【y t】he m/o/st common form of marine litter found on Europe\an【 beaches, according to \a r【ecent repo/rt.The European 【Parliament estimat\es these new po/licie\s woul/d s【ave【 Eu\ropea/n households over \€60【0m per year.Share this articleCopy/paste the ar/ticl/e video embed link【 b】elow:Copy】ShareTweetSharesen】dShareTwe/etSharesend\MoreHideShare\Se【ndSh/are【Sh/areShareSendShareShare】You m\igh/t also【 like/ \ 】 Micro-plastic\s 】a/re not just a problem for the oceans, the】y're now in \the air /】 【 \ 】 / 【 \ 【/ The wee【k in Europe: Rescu】e plans, MEPs on the】 fr】ontline/【【s & robo-helpers【 \ / \ Meet the 【MEPs returning to【 medicine amid/\ th/e c】oronavirus pandemic \ 【 / 】 More ab//ou【tEU Parliam/】entWat】erEnvironmental protec【ti】on \ 【 Browse today【's tagsC】o【uld seaweed be th【e fuel of the/ future/?

 

Nigerian women revolutionising Fine Art 【When art/】 is a force for goodThe 【import/ance of res】【toring mar\ine biodiversity

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Ic【eland's lar】gest national p\ark is h】oping to【 /gain UNESCO World\ Herit\age sta】tus at UN committe】e talks in】 Azerbaijan/.Vatnajökull Nati【onal Pa】rk is home to vast glaciers, utterly uni\nh【abit【ed land and ten ac\】tive v\olcanos. Despite the presence of o\p】posing elements/, the great land】scape h\as remained st【ab【l/e【 for/ more than 1,000 years. The meltin【g ice from the /glaciers f【uels some of Iceland'】s most powerful rivers. T】he seasonal ebb 】and flo\w of the ice 】i】s 【crit】ical in mainta/】】ining the/ sta】】bilit\y of the ecosystem of】 /Vatnaj&o】um】】l/;kull\, wh】ich covers 14% of Iceland.Now, however, r/ising temperatures are causing the gl【aciers to melt at unprec/e/d【ented rates. Every/ y\ear, more ice disappears,/ r/evea【ling 】new la\nd underneath the glaciers. In the/ last \century】 alone】, Vatnajök\ull has lost 10% of its volume.The a/re【a is so unlike /anyth】ing else /o\n earth that it has been used as a case study by as/tronauts. In the months pr\eceding the Apollo 11 mission in the late six\ties, Neil Armstrong and his c/olleagues visited the 】park to \study its l】un【ar】-like/ terrain. Som/e a】reas\ of Vatnajökull Nati\onal Park are utterly uninhabited by /lif】e, \be it animal o/r plan\t, render\ing it an ideal】 place to \stud\y moon-like geology.Water, fire /and ice, the elemen/ts that】 make up 【the uniqu\e park【 ar【e represen】ted on t/he nati\onal f\lag of /Ice\la】n【d, blue fo/r water, red for fire, and white】/ for ice. If granted /Wor\ld Heritage Sta【tu】s, Va\tnajöku】ll National Park】 \wil【l b【e the third】 Icelandic site to】 a\chieve the status.Want more【 news?】Video editor • Fr\ancois RazyShare this a【\/rtic】leCopy/pa\ste the 【ar【ticle video emb】ed /link【 bel【ow:CopyShareTweet【S//ha\resen\dShareTweet\SharesendMoreHid【eShar【eSendShareShareShareSe】ndShareShareYou m【ig/ht also l/ike 】 】 / \ 【 / 【 \ \Climate Change top of t\he agen\da as No【rdic mi【niste/rs m/ee】t /Germ/any's Merkel in Iceland 】 【 【 / 【 【【 \ 【\ \Tens of t】housands of Estonian】s perfo/rm mass folk singin【g 】 / \ 】【 Well-being agenda: d/oes this spell/ the e\nd for GDP? \ 】 More abou\t20-seconds【Icel\andEnvironmental protec/tionUNESCO Cultur】a/l 】Heritage ListEnviro/nment / 【 Browse today�【39;s ta】gsFrom Amsterdam】 to Sy【dney on el【ec/t/r\icity

 

\Clima\te change i/s\ makin【g Arctic waters more access】ib/le to/ vessels, 】\raising the c\on/troversial prospe【c】t of more ind/ustrial-\scale fishing/. On the lates/t episode of】 \Ocean, Euronews】 looks at what'\s being done】 to prev/ent\ /the】】 threat to \the 【A】rctic e】cosystem.Greenland i】s warming\. Among/ other thi【ngs,\ this【 means long\er f】ish【ing seasons. Be/tween the ic///ebergs o/f Iluliss】at, it&rsq【uo;s 】a gold ru/sh. Fish\ing boat】s equipped with【 mo【dern machinery pull up hundreds of ki/los of catc【h every d/ay.Ilulissat fisherman Marti】n J&os【las/h;rgense\n is worried:&ld【quo;There】\’s too much fishing goi【ng on around here】. It’/s so p】rofitable\ now that al【【l the】 b/ig 】】fish h【ave been taken out; we’re catching smaller fi/sh now”.Sleds, dogs and boatsTo be\ closer to buyer/s, fisherm\en are moving from 【coastal villag/es to ci\ti【es. 【The【 population of Oqaatsut, an \Inuit s\/ettlement on Greenland’s west】 c/oast, ha/s f】al/len to less th/an 30 people. Sle】d d\ogs, tra【ditionall【y us】ed for【 ice fishing and 】huntin/g, have been d【ecimated i/n man/y commu/nities, as th【e 【w\ar】/mi\ng climate makes bo【at/s mo【re usefu【l than dogs.&rdquo/;The sledding 【used】 to start in【 October," say/s/ Oqaatsut fish【erma/n Steen Gabr/ielsen, "but now that there’s not eno【ugh ice, we ca【n just use bo\ats all year round.&r\dquo;Arctic Se\a Ice Reaches 2019 Minimum Extent\C\hanging ecosystemAs the seas \get war/mer, new species of fish are finding their way to Greenland&】rsquo;【s c【oa/sts —【 【the/se include mackerel, herring, At/lantic \bluefi】n/ tuna and cod. But not every\one is ha/ppy. \The fishermen say t【heir most profitable catch — halibut — /is getting harder to find during the warmer pa/rt of th【e year.“Halibut li\kes cold water," explains Niels Gundel/, a /fisher\m【an 】in Ilulissa/t.【 "As summers /b】ecome warmer and longer 【it moves away, to stay wher【e【 it&rsq】uo;】/s【 c【\ool.”Immin\ent/ dan【】gerI/n the fut\ure, retreating sea i】ce an【d /changes in/ fish stocks could bring commerc/ial fish】ing fleet【s into th】e unprotected international wate】rs a】/round t】\he North Pole.Scien/t\ist】s a\【re sounding t】he alarm: unregul\ated fishing could destr】oy the poorly studied e】cosystem of/ the Centra/l Ar【】ctic Ocean】, where fish can b】e sparse and essent】ial to the s/urvival of】/ other【 animals.In a bid t\o stave off t】his imminent thr\e【at/, the European Union br【ought all\ main parties togeth/er in Ilulissat to agree on】 a c/】omme】rcial fishing】\ ban 】in the Arc/tic hi\gh seas\ for at least 16 ye/ars.【T【his land/mark internati】onal a】g】reement was s/【igned by the EU, C/anada, C\hi\na, Denmark (inclu/ding Greenl】and and【 the Fa】roe Island/s), Iceland, 】J【】apan, the /Republi】】c of Kor\ea, Norway, Russia and the U\nited States. Together, thes\e 【pa\rties represent some 75% of gl【obal GDP.Arctic cat\ch 2017Under this legally bindi【ng agreement, /the 】C/entral Arctic area - roughly the size \of the Medit【er/】ranean Sea - will remain off-limits for 【f【ishi【n\g fle【ets, at【 leas】t unti/l scientists con】firm\ that fishing i】n the r\egi】on can be done su【stai】nably.Preca/utionary ap【proachAt the Arctic \University of Norway in \Troms/ø, Professor To\re Henrikse/n he\ads the】】 Norweg\ian Centre for the Law of the/ Sea\.&l/dquo;T\his agree\ment/ is reflect\ing the precauti/o】nary a】pproach, that whe/n you// ha【ve little or very\ inadequate /\inform\/ation you should act\ cautiously \and only reg【ulate, and adapt the regu/lation, according to 【the in【formation/ you have," Professor Hen\rikse】n explains. "P】reviously, 【you started fishing, /and then you regu】late it. And th】en at 【that stage,】 it could b\e too late.”/Map\ping the Arctic se/asThe【 futu】re of the】 ban 【will depend on th\e find\ings o/f the scien/tific c/onsortium le【d by pro】fessor Pauline /Sn】\oeijs Leij/onmalm. Sh】e heads a\ t】eam of European researchers on the MOSAiC expediti】【on — a year-long silent ice drift close to the North \Pole.Onboard th/e Polar\stern icebreaker“Normall【y, wh\en】 【the ic/ebreak】er mov【es through 】the\ \ice, you w/ill/ not get good acoustic data,/ because th】ere/’s too much sound fro/m t【he i/cebreaker. No/w we&rsquo【;\ll have a whole year \】o\/f acoustics, and it\ 【is just a d\ream!&/rdquo;As w】【ell【 as using sona/r, the /\EU-suppo//rted r\esearchers will rec】ord vid/eos with a deep-water【 camera, take environm】ental DNA sam【ples at various depths, a/nd for the f【irst time catch some Central Arctic fish.】MOSAiC Exp/edition/'s d\eep-water/ re/search camera“We will\ be able to a/nalyse its stoma\ch, 】its/ stable isotopes, i/t【】】【s fatty ac\i【ds," Profe】ssor Leijonmalm says. "It will tell us 】about the 】he】alth【 of the fish, and where/ it has com\e/ from because \fish mi\grate — so we /w【ill have a 】lot of info】rmat【ion, just by having/ a fish in our hands.”The disco【veries of thi\s \and fu\t】ure】 expe【ditions will deter\mine wheth【er fi【sh】ing /\in the Central Arctic Oce\an /can be done sustainably &mda】sh; or whether \these h/igh se】as should remain untouche\d for the dec【ades to come.】To wat】ch th【e f【ull epi\sode of /Ocean, click on 【the media pla/yer above121212121212121212Share this/ articleCop】y/paste the article 】【video embe【d li\nk below】:CopyShareTweetSharesen/dShareTweetSharesen【dMoreH/ideShareSendShare【ShareShareSendShare【ShareYou might als\o like \ \ 【 】/ 【 \ EU fish/ quota q\uarrel\ - ministe/rs hail d\ea/l, NGOs slam overfishing 【 【 】 \ 【 \ 】 Watch: Thirty-】five years of Arctic thaw in\ tw/o minut/es / / \ 【 】 【 S】cientists have embarked fro】m\ /Norway on the longest-ever expedit/ion to the /Arctic 【 【 【 More ab/ou/tGlobal warming and cli】mate change【FisheryArcticEnv\iro】nment\al prote/ctionGreenland 【 /\【 【 Mo】st viewed 【 【 【 / \ 【 \ \ What infl\uenc】e o\n climate is/ the coronavirus 【lockdown \r【eal【【ly havi】ng? / 】 The new AI system safeg】【uar/d\【ing premature /babies fro/m infecti\o【n \ 】 【 】 \ 【 / Messenger RNA: the molecule that may/ teach our b【odies to beat cancer【】 \ 【 】\ 【 】 \ A】pple a】nd Google 】say they'll work toge【ther【 to】 trace spr】ead of coronavi/rus via smartphones \ // 】 How EU funding is chan【ging t【h\e face/ of 【L】【atvi/an in】novation\ 【 【 Browse tod【ay's\ tags【At the frontline of an 【Ext/inction Rebellion climate protest i/n】 BerlinIn a tighten/【ed u】p policing of\ the】ir /fishin】g 】industry Thailand has beg】un intercepti\ng and ins【pecting fishing boats far o\ut at sea this ye】a】r, one of many\ n/e/w measures\/ to curb】 its dangerously high levels of overfishing【.【For d【ecades the Gulf of Thailand's fish stocks were p\lundered with abandon. Limits were ignored and b【oa\ts re【gul\arly worked in restri\cted areas, endangering【// speci/es with bar/ely 【any o/ve】rsight.Those fish\ went/ on to be exported, often ending up on the plates of cons【umers in Europe】.But \internati\onal pressure moun【t\ed in the \last few years, and since \the EU is the largest importer /of Thailand's fi【sh it managed to wield a lot of influe/nce.I【n 2015/ th\】e EU issued a &ldq【uo;yello【\w card,” wa\rning the /Thai government】 it would suspend its imp】orts 】if no/ a【ction was】 t】【ake【n, and in Janu】ary it was finally lifted \and a "green ca【rd" was awarded.The measu/res /Thailand has now adopted to\ satisfy th/e EU【 ra/nge from \new rules t\o vessel// monitoring systems, as well as a satellite-\based system\ of track/【in\】g the mo】v【ements \of fishing boats, enforced by the Royal Thai Navy.T【【hai officials say 】Europe&rsquo/;【s 【pr\es】sure has helpe】【d the/m to implem\【ent 】these reform】s, convincing the 【fisheri\es to accept t【ighte【ned control.&l\dquo【\;】As the biggest importer of】\【 the s\eaf【ood of t【he world, I thi【nk the EU is using 【its power trying to solve the probl】em. That&rsqu/o【;s \w【hy /we’re not c【om【pla/ining about the yello】【w card at【 al/l. And the yello\w card for /us is】 like 】a w】ake-up【 c】all: 】O\K, you know the pro【blem, no【w/ you ha/ve to 】wake 【up an】d do something】 s/ignificant,&rdq【uo; Adisorn P\romthep, the Director&nd/ash;Genera\l /of Thailand's Department o/f【 】Fisheries, told E】uron\ews.&】l/dquo;Sinc【e the yellow card was\ issued, the 【Commission and Thailand have\ eng【aged\ in a construc\tive process of c【ooperation and dialogue,&rdq\uo; the Europ\e【an Commission, 】the /executiv【e\ arm o】f th【e EU,】\ s【aid【 in \a statem\/ent in February announcing t\】h】e lifting of the card】.&【ldquo;Th/is has resul\ted in a major upgrade of t】【he Thai fis【heries g【ov/ernance, 】】in a/ccordan\ce w\i】th the internatio【nal commi】t/ments o\f the country.】”Thai seafood exports stoo/d at 1.85 bi【lli/on e【uros in 2017, Co/mmerce Min】istry】/ dat】a show, recovering to their 2014 l】evel/ after a drop i\n 2015 to 】.6 billion 【euros following the European Union\ w】arning.Ab/out 9.】9 perce】nt of Thai s/e】afood exports/ 【wen】t t\o the European Union last year, v】ersu\s 10.3 【percent i】n 2014, m】inistry d】ata sho【w.Jaroo\nsak Petchsri, Head of【 Thai R\egional Fisheri】es Patro】l, \has 【been /patr\olling the se/\as off Thailand for 30 】ye】ars sa//id 】he's noticed the difference."In the past, w/e didn&rsqu/【o;t really have much control\ over the f/isheries&h【ellip; They were depleting the sea,】 harvest/in【g fi\sh big and sma】ll, remo/ving it in spawni/【ng season】s. Now, with \the new la\ws,【 t【hese 【things h\ave ch/anged," he told Euronews.Even some of the fishing \captains】【 say/ - outwardly at leas【t - th/at they're fi/ne with the new 】s/【yst/e【m.】“I agree th【at all t//he i\llegal fishi【ng h【as to /end. We no】w hav【e a 】satellite tracker on our// bo\a\t, there are inspections 【at port】s, we l\og everything we】 do/ every d/ay, 】so it woul【d\ be really\ hard to d】o/ any illeg【al fishing n【ow,” Prasi\】tchai Woraratyanont, a fishing boat captain, told Eu\ronew/s.S【】amut\ Sakhon 【port, 40 ki/lome】t【res southwest of Bangkok, is one of 】Thailand’s largest.All large boats using it no【w hav\e to 】\re】po/rt to the authorit/ies before and after ever】y fishing trip. Officers use a new c【omput】er system analysing detailed information】 about each vessel and its journey at sea.【 If anything seems/ su/sp\ic【ious/, the system will automat【ically recom\me】nd a thor/ough inspection【.【“We consider \it v\ery important to educat】e t/he fisher/men a/nd explain to them what 【regulations they must fol\low. These insp【ections all/ow us【 t/o make su】r\e everything 【is in 【order as far as the vessel, the】 c/rew /and the\ catch \ar】e concerne\d," Sagultem Peera, head of the port'【s In/ Out Centre told Eu【ronews.And bac/k/ at the 【Department of Fisheries' brand new monitoring c\entre in B\angkok roughl//y 600T/witte【r react【s to police ba\n o/n E\xtinction 】Rebellion pro【tes\ts in Lond/on fish\ing /vessels, all e/quipp【ed /with s\atellit】/e trackers, a\/re wat】ched aro\und the c【】lock.&l\【d/\quo;We a】re receiving data on the speed 【/and direction of each boat in r/eal t\ime. If a trawler ha【s sl\owed down, \】fishing in a restricted【 \zone, we&【rsquo;ll start /the procedure to intercept/,” Bundit K】ullavanijaya, Head /of Ve】ssel M【onitor【ing System /workgroup, Thailand Department of/ Fishe【rie\s, said.Containers with frozen fish are als/o inspected with x-r\ays and secured wit】h new ele】ctronic l【\ocks. 】/Be\fore, illegal/ catch】es from other count\ries could be shipped through Thailand to Europe.Thailand is jus】t one of many cou【ntries struggling with harmful fishing practices. An estima/ted one-fifth of all worldw【ide catches ar】e illegal, unreported, or /unr】eg/ulated — g【lobally that】’s 10 billion euros pe\r year./Som/e illegal catches w\ould often l\and in Thailand o\/n refrigerated cargo ships. So/me 【/o【f these huge vessels【 were【 getting t/hei\r/ d\aily catch from smaller,】 il/leg】al fishing/ boats on th/e high s【eas — a practice/ calle/d &ld/qu【o;fish laund】ering.&\rdquo;Now/ f】/oreign flag vess【e/ls are not al【l】owed i【nto T//h【ai ports any【more unless 【their cargo is/ 】properly c【【er/t\ifi【ed.“No/w 【that our laws hav\e been amend【ed, we ca【n cont/rol and inspect f/orei】gn flag v/e/ssels. The】\ sys\te\m is very comp【lete - we can 【trace every can of tuna b\ack/ to the v/e【ssel tha【t caught it,"\ Jama【ree Rakbanglea\m, the Port State Measures Inspec】tor, told Euronews.121212121212121212Share this articl/eCopy/paste the 【article\ video embed link below/:Cop【】yShareT【weetShar】esendShareTweetSharesendMoreHid\eShareSendShareShareShareSend】ShareShare【You mig【h【\t also like / 【 Why \did it tak/e /3.5 years f/or T【hail【【and to get【 rid of t【h/e EU’s \illegal fishing 】�【39;/yellow /card'? 【 / / More about\F【ishe/ryThailandOceanEnvir】o/n\mental prote/c】tion / / \ Most viewed 】 】 【 \ What influe/nc/e o【n c【limat\e is【 the【 coronavirus lockdown really having? 】 / 【 \ T/he new AI syst【em safeguard【ing】 p【remature bab/ies from infection / \ Messenge\r RNA: the molecule\ that may 】teach/ our】 b【o】dies to beat cancer 】 【 \ /【 / Apple and Google say they\'ll work together】 to /t】race \spr/ead of co\/ronavirus vi【a sm\artphones 】【 】 \ Ho【w EU fu\nding is cha/nging the】 】face o【f Lat【\via】n innovation 】 【 】 Browse toda/y's tags

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Robinson Crusoe isl\and sets example】 fo】】r/ 】the world in con\ser/vationText 【size/A【aAaYou can d/ocument i】t, just like \ten/s of】 thousands of citizens around t】he worl】d /joi/ned \【\】forc\es for thr】ee d】ays to do so.In 2016【 the Nat\/ural History Museum/ of Lo【s/ Angeles County and California\ Academy of Sci/ence/s started a competition between the tw\o\ citi】es. The g/oal was to in\volve citi\zens in documen\ting nature to hel】p them understa\n】d the urban bi\odiversity】 around them. T\he friendly rival【ry between Los An【geles and San Fran】】cisco enc/ouraged a lot of people to compete and use thei/r c【am【【era and smartphone to\ ma】ke wildlife /obse/rvations.The City Nature Challenge became nationa】l by/ 2017 and internati】onal by 2018. La/st year nearl】y 70 c【ities around the wor【\ld were 【taking part in the com\petiti【on. With 17,000 p】eople partic【ipatin/g, /m/o】re than 441,000】 ob\servations were 】made and 8,600 species were captured. Of these pictured【 spec】ies, 599 of them we/r\/e rare, endangered and th/reatened. Th【/is year】, /the【/ Ci【ty Nature \Challenge got 【more\ than 150 c【ities involved.Click on th】e video above to】 l/earn\/【 more about t/】his year【's chal】lenge and o\ne/【 of the\ cities with the highest contribu\tion.】S】ha/r【e this artic\le】 / M\ore from places

 

Our s【eas a】re 【facing increasi】ng competition for spa/ce and reso/urces — between o\ld sectors, su【】c\h as fishing, and new, such as offshore wind farms.\T/his compe【tit】ion can\ lea】d to \c】onfl/icts.\ Uncoordin\at【ed use of marine space al/so【 threatens the he】alth of the oc【ean, adding to\【 the destructive \effects of c】limate/ c】hange.P/rote【cting the ma\r【ine e/nvironment, re/d/ucing conflicts and e\ncouraging investment are t【】he aims of maritime 【spatial planning【, or/ MSP &m【dash; a proce/\ss th/a【t puts economic ac\tiv\ities and ecosystems on a map. Aut\horities \and stakeholders work together, developing plans at local, national an【d t\rans\national levels.It’s /essent/ial that different economic \sec/tors, a\gencies a【nd governments cooperate fo】r the proces\s to 【/be】 successful. The European Commission and IOC-UNESC\O ar】e d\evelop】ing int【ernati【onal gu/idelines to promote m/ari\time spatial】 plann/ing around the world.The】 goal /is to trip】le the marine a】re【\a benef【iting f【rom MSP by】 】2030, covering【 30 per cent of m\aritim\e area/s under【 national j】urisdiction.Shar】e this 】articleShareTweetShare】send】S/hareTweetSharese【ndM【oreHideShareSendShareShareShareSen】dShareShare/More a\b【outOceanEnvironmental /protec/\tionFish\eryPortugal360° vi】deo \ Most viewe/【d \ 【】 / 】 / What influence on climate i】s】 the coronavirus lockdown r/eally having? 【 / 【The\ new AI system 】safeguarding \【premature bab【ies from/ /i\nfecti/\on / 】 // / / Messenge\r【 RNA:\ the molecule that may teach our bodies 【\t】o beat cancer\ 】 【 / Ap【ple and Google sa】y they'/【;ll work \together to trace sprea\d of coro/navirus via sm\ar】t【phones / / 【 How EU funding is changin/g the face \of L/atvian\ innovatio/n】 】 】 \ Browse to\day's t】agsWATCH | From castles to cabins, \these homes/\ 】w【ere 】ma\de of wa】ste“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Green growth: promot/ing i【n【n】ovation and sus/ta\in/ability to foster busines\s in Europe\ 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tags

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Envir【onmen】t/al group WWF h】as accused Hungarian authori【ties of ille\gally】 cu/tting down a forest protected by the /Eu】ropean Union.Last month\,】 Hungary's Nation【a/l Water D】irectorate f/elled a\n old flo】od pl】ain fo/rest in a pr\otected are】a【【 along/【 the T\isza River near T\iszaug, a village som【e 120 kilometres south-east of B】uda/pest.Parts of the area /ar\e pr【o\tected by the EU as a Natura 2000 /site for provi\ding a】 c\or】e breeding and resting place to rare and threatened spec】【ies including black s】torks.Accord】ing to the WWF/, flood pl\ain forests &m【d/a【sh/; an area of l】and near the】 banks of a river 【p【rone to floodin/g &/mdas】h; \ar】e amon\/g the most 【endange/red habitat in Hungary with their s\urface having 】shrunk t/o less than 1% of what it was before/ river regulatio/ns came into force.T\he【 NGO bla/sted the c\ountry's floo\d manag【emen/t practices 【as "unsustainable". It arg】ued /that in many 【previous instances, the felling【【 of trees to redu【ce flooding had not/ been ca\rried out to pr】otect human life and set/tlement, but\ "to prote】ct 】】poor/-qu】ality l【a【nd" /ins】t\ead\ and with little r【egar】d to nature and \wildli【fe【.The group【 said 】【that acro/ss the Ti\sza River Basin, "the 】wil/d【erness】 now resemb//les Mordor"."A large 】part of the \flood plain forest】s and \wetla/\nds have been conf\】【ine/d to riverside emb/ankments, and agricultural areas/ have mainly replaced thes\e form【er large 】floodplains【," Peter Kajner, from WWF Hungary Liv【e R】ivers pro/gr\a】mme】, s/aid.The/ N【GO accused t【he 【National Water Directorate o【f having carried out the felling【 without the proper authorisations and called for st【atutory penalties to be i】m\posed.Th【e National/ Water D】irec\torate ref】ute【d WWF's\ a/llegati【on t】hat the cutti\ng】\ was illegal, writing in a statement that it ha】d follow】ed ministerial dec】re/es and\ secured authorisation from】 t\he local county go】】vernment.It ad/ded t【ha】t cutting do\wn mature t】【rees is an establi//sh【ed p\o】lic】y to reju/venate forests and that it was carri/ed out in January to 】not disturb/ the re【p【roducti\ve period of the rare species w【ho \ca/ll t\he area home.Sha/】re this ar】ticl/eShareTw】eetSharesendShareTwee/tSh【aresen\dMoreHideSha/reSendS\hareS/【hareS/hare/SendShareShareYou m】ight also like \ \ / 】 \ 【 Sziget music festiv/】al in H】ung/】ary showcases its【 green credent】ials / \ R/omania&/#039;s vir/gin forests rava/ged by /】9;wood maf/ia'\ 】 / 【 \ \ 【 【 EU】's young/est c\ommissioner on how to turn climate c【risis ar\ound 【 / More abou】tEnvironmental pr【o【tecti\onFores【tsHungar\y B/rowse t/oda】y's ta\gs\Founda/tion promot【es sustainable food 【product/i】【on

 

  第一,捕鱼网站Red Sea corals flourish at previously-restricte【d Israeli beach

  第二,星空棋牌】9;Em【otion【s run】nin/g high&#/039; in Brexit blame g\a\me

  第三,捕鱼网站T】ext sizeAaA/aOne ma【n's t】ra/s\h is\ another\】 man's treasure/ - and some people 【build a house out of it. F\or example, thousands of glass bottles can make an ent】ire hous【e\ or chapel, such as Edou】/ard Arsenault's Bottle H\ouses in/ Cape/ Egmon/t, Pr\ince Edward /Island, Canada. He used 2】5,】000 mul【ticoloured bottles to erect t/hree buildings in 】the /'80s. Today it \is a must-see tou/\rist】 attraction.If ther/e is no glass, plastic \bottles can make /a very 【fi\ne alterna\tive. After losi\n【g her\ h【ouse in an earthqua/ke in El\ Salvador, 】87/-yea/r】-old Maria】 Pon】ce【 built a new\ home with \plastic bo/ttle【s, which 【she h【ad】 collecte/d throughou】t se/ven 】months from roadside trash.Maria Be【rsabe Po/nce, 87, st/【ands outsi】de he【r hou/s】e made out】 of \plast/ic\ bottles in the vi】llage of El Borbo】llonReuters/Jose CabezasWood,】 rocks and even an old bus can m\ake a very u】n【ique house,/ such as \the【】 one in Japan, /pho/tographe【d by Christoph Ru【pprecht, a geographer【 from Australia, according to who\】m, this quir/ky house【 \】was built e\【ntirely 】ou】t of discarded trash an\d recycled materials.House made entirely ou/t o\f recycled materials in JapanFlickr/Christoph Rupprecht】Unable\ to find 】【a【 suitab【le/ house,【】 Egyptian Ta/ymour 【El】-Had【idi 【made a big step toward【】s his dream of having/ an environ【mentally friendly home in 2012. /Four years】 /la\ter he【 moved int\o \a small castle【 in Cai【ro, w/here /all the walls, ceilings, windows and \even be【ds are ma【de of rec\ycled\】 material such as discarded concrete block】s, red bricks \a/nd glas/s bot【tles.If yo/u do not have concrete or d\iscarded bricks,】 a few thous/and g\l/a/ss bottles \can be of \h\elp. Si/ngle \mother Ivon【e Martins made a DIY home in \B\【r【azil using\ thousand】s of discarded bottle【s.Hit play the vid\eo a】bove to learn more about these homes m/】ade of garbage.Share thi【s a/rticle M】ore 【fr】om life

  第四,ag环亚集团An international ag\reeme\nt signed in 2018 pre【ventively banned all【】 commercial fishing】 in \the【【 】Central Arct【ic Ocean —【 long befor【e any 】fishi【ng could /\real】istically begin. Why was that ban necessary, and how can marine biologists 【ta/ke advantage of】 planned po【lar/ expedition\s to/ f/ind out more about future fishing prospects in the Arct【/ic \high seas?Dr. Pauline Snoeijs 【Leijonmalm, Professor of Marine Ecol【o】gy a【t S】tockholm University, talked to E/uronews hours before lea【ving Troms&os】lash【;, Norway onbo\ard the Po\larstern\ icebreaker f【or the MOSAiC \expedition at the Nort\h Pole.She bega/n by explaining【 \w/hy we n】eed a fishing ba\n in the region:“We don/’t kn【ow a】nything abou【】/t 【the ecosystem,【 and\ we don’t kno【w anyt】h【ing about which fish we\ have! It’s a very /nutr【i/e】nt-poor ecosystem,\ so I expect ver/y little fish. And then if you st【art fishing, th【en you can destroy the ecosy/stem, or th/e balance of the organisms."MOSAiC Exped/ition'/s research camera【Once th】e/ ic】e disappe】ars, there \could be a ru\sh to fish\ t\he are【a\, which lies outside the exclusive eco】nomic zon\e of th【e\ coastal countries“\So that’s 】why we ne【】ed to kno\w】 now what /we have in this sea that perhaps can be/ exp/loited by anyone," P】rofessor Leijonmalm explains.【 "And 】】of course, we need prot【ectio】n for this are【】a. So what we’re going to do i【【】s to build\ a way to protect thi\s ar【ea 【by c/】ol/lect【ing b【ase】line【 data.&l/d【q/uo;We】 are at the very/ beginning of this/.\ What we are doi\ng is now mappi/ng, and this is t\he first expedi\t】ion tha】t&rs\quo;s going to map. And \the big advantage of conn【ecting\ to such【 a big exp/edition is t】hat we get all the environmental data【】 from the ship’s 】program &】mdash;】 s/o we【 do no】t need to】 /\measure the】 chlorophyll /our【se】lves, or the 】【nutrients, or not【 even th\e zooplan【】】kt】on. We \need o】nly to look【 a】t the fish】, and the other data【 we can use, and connect then】 the fi】sh data t\o. /So that’s/ a very big adv【\a【n\tage of these【【 big expeditions./&rdqu【o;/Pol】arstern ic/ebreaker sets sail】 for the North PoleShare thi\】s art/】\icl/eCopy/pas【te th【e /article video embed \link \below:Cop\yShareTweetShar【esen【dShare\T\w【eetShare【sendMoreHideS】hareSendShareShare/Sha】reSendSha\reShareMore aboutGlobal warming and climate changeFisheryArcticEnviro【nmenta/l protectionGreenland / Mo】s】t v\iewed 【 Wh【at i\nfluence on climate】\ is the cor/o/navirus lockdown really having? \ 【 】 】 】 \ 】 / The new AI system s\【【af【eg【uarding prematu】re【 /babies from infectio】n 】 \ 【 Messe\nger RN】A: the molecule that ma/y teach our bodies to \beat cancer 【 /\ 】 \ App/le\ and G】o\【ogle 】say they'll wo/rk \togethe【r to 】trace sprea\d of cor【onavirus via smartphon】es 【 】 \ \ How EU funding /is ch/ang】ing the face 【o/f Latvia\n innovation 】 】 】 【 \ Bro\wse today/'s【 ta\gs

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