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AG88导航网【ag88.shop】亚游真人 4MOWfM73Text sizeAaAaA\s on【e/ of the o【r\ganisations aiming to】 tackle marine plast/ic pollution, the \S】eychelles Is/l【a【nd Foundation【 has just\ 】released a video 】(click on \the player/ abo】ve) proving that e/ven 【the most remote corners 【o\f the ocean are suffering from the horrors of plastic waste and【 endang/e【red a【nimals. UNES\】CO World He/ritage Sites】 are no exception/. 】It is/ claimed that【 【if the present】 tren/d 】contin/ues, 】oce【ans \could con\tain 】more plastic than fish by 50.\/From bag/s 【to bottles, a/round 13 million tonnes of 【p】lastic flows int\o our oceans eve】ry/ year, acco\rding to a rece/nt UN report. Marine spe/cies ingest or become entangled in plastic de\bris, sometimes cau\s】ing injury or even death. The UN says 100,0/00\ marine animals die each y】ear d\ue to /plastic related causes.On【 many African【 i\slands, /\including the Seychelles, a growing num】/b【er of 【steps】 have bee】n implemented as envi【ro】nm【entalism and tourism ha\ve 】to go hand in hand to protect the /future of th】ese areas.】Click o【n the video【 above to see how】/ \the l\o/cals are abo/ut to s\ave one of the wo/】rld's/ most exclusive \destinations as well as part of 】the /Indian Oc\ean.Share this article】 】 Mo/re from placeszzwF

Jg8Q360 \Video: Putting\ marine\ /reso【ur/ces on the ma\paSci

DkMxEasy【Jet unveils plans to become world&】#0//9;s first carb/on-】neutr】al airlinegjkkOpPt

cEphText sizeAaA【aIt /may be quite some time /until t/he fast-fashion industry c【o/\m/ple【te】ly slow/s 】do/wn, but wit【h new trends\ being set in motion, 【/th/ere is now hope /t】hat 'slow fashi】o】n'】 i\s a【 trend gat/hering trac】tion.T/he demand for 'cool',/ affordable】 clothing/ is h\ard 【to keep up with, with clothes bei】ng/ d【el【】ivered /in bulk i\nt】o highstreet shops\ t\o try 【and match ret/ail expectation/s. But more often than\ not/, they come with a high en】vironment\al pri\ce tag in t/he long term;/ the f/】ashion indus】try\ is the second bigg【est polluter in the 【worl【d, o\nly second to oi/l.A glo【b】al movement called Fashion R】evolut/ion /who are campaign】ing for sustain】a\bility and greater transparency in th\e fashion【 supply chain, have just released their latest report. Known 【】as【 the Fashio\n \Tr\ansparency In】dex, the repo\rt 】scores over 20】0 major【 global【 brands on how su【stainable their manufacturin//g pro/ces/s /is. /As pr】edi】cted, the a\verage score 】is only 21%, indicat】ing that there 【is s\til/l】 a considerable way to go in improving w【or/king c【onditions, hum【an rights and d【ecreasin/g the\ environmental impact of production.\ This rele/ase of /fi】gures c【oincides with the 】s/ixth】 anni/versary of the devastating Rana /】Plaza garment factory collapse 【\in Banglades\h, where /more tha/n /1000\ workers d】ied and aro\und 2,5Creating music f【rom garbage we/re injur】ed. The tragic factory disaster was】 the first 】to really t/rig【ger alarm \bells on a g/lo】ba】l scale, rais/ing awareness about the deadly co【st of fast】】 fashion and th】e frankly inhumane working【】 conditions【/ in 【garment factories. \ C\lick on】 th【e video above to see learn mo\/【re abo】ut this report.S【hare this article More from st【yle0MAQ

mW5WTe【xt sizeAaAaEarl/】ier this\ ye】ar Glasto【nbur】y Fes\tival made hea/dlines b/y annou\ncing t\h\at it wi/ll implement a site-wide ban on plast【ic bottles sta】rt/ing in 2019. All over the world, musi】c festival【s of all【 size/s are becoming \increasi】n/gly c\onscious of their\ ecolog\ic】al footprint.According to P【owerful Thinking, an/ organi【zation that works with festivals t】o l\ower their envir【onment】al footprint, 】i】n the【 United Kingdom alone summer music festivals are resp【onsib】le for ap\proximately 100 kilotons \of CO2 (including audie/nce travel), 23,500 tons of w\aste an】d 5 millio】【n li【ter/s 】of diesel \con【sumpti】o\n.But it/ do】esn’t have to b】e this way\. Mo\re an/d more fe\stivals /are takin【g sustainability and environm【ental co\ns】iderat/ions ve【ry【 se】rio\usly so\/ that you【, the festiva【l-g】oe【r, ca】n party it up the gr\een wa】y. One such【 【f】e【stival is Budapest&rsq】uo;s Sziget Festiva\l, which has won 】Best Li】ne-U/p a】nd /Best Major F\es\tival at 【t\he Europea【n F】estival/ Awards 】sever\al ti\mes. We sat down wit\h】 Akos Do\minus, Sz\iget’s Sustainab】ility Manager for the past 17 ye【ars, to find out what】 】they/&r\squo;r/e doing to【 keep Sziget as green as 】possible. V【iew this post \o/n\ InstagramW\hich re-cup】 d/id/ you ch\oose to take h【ome \wi【th you? :) #sziget #szigetofficial #szigetlove\\revolution #j【ointheloverevolution #\SZIGET2018 #recups】 #/sziget2019 #ec/oA post shared b/y Szi/【get Festival (@sz\igetofficial) on Sep 】1T\ex【t sizeAaAaA lot\ has been said rec【ently abo【【ut the 】negati【ve\ impac【t of eating t/oo /much meat.\ N】ot \only ha\s too 【much of the proces\se】】d k】ind been linked to a higher ri【sk \of some cancers, /but the environmental 【impact of intensive 】farming and agric【ultural car】/bon emissions】 are a serious concern. \Ho【weve\r, you/ don’t necessarily have t/o turn veggi/e \in order to make a positive difference &\ndash; i\n【ste【ad make more thought【ful choices w\hen buyi】ng and c】ooking 】meat. Her\e&rsq/uo;s \how…Buy/ les/s mea\tThis may be obvious,】 【but buying less meat is one 】of the best thi】ngs you can do for both the environment and our】 health. 【We’re nearly al\l guilty of pi/ling too【 much o】】n our\ 【】【plates, and 】o【ften w\asti【ng bits that/ /w/】e can】’t manage to eat, so buying /less can h】elp reduce waste and ensur/e be【tter portion control while \a/lso/ lower】ing our environmental impact. R\ather than choosing pre-p/ac【ked sup\erma/【rk/et /mea【t where you h/ave very little choice】 in/ 【t【erms of quantity, try to buy from】 a \local butcher or farm shop where you can s】pecify exactly 】h\ow mu【ch you’d like. You’ll】 reduce your plasti\c usage t/his way too【.In【 part/】icu】lar, buy less b【eef – as methane-p\r\oduc\ers【, co\ws ar【e thought to have the \biggest i\mpact on our cl\imate as compared to any other form o\f l/ivestock. In fact, data s】ugge【sts that【 c】ows release the e\quiv\alent of 16k/g of carbon diox【id\e for ev\ery/ ki/l【o of mea【t produced. Interes】tingly, the impac】\t sh】eep have is al/so quite signif【ic/ant at 13kg of/ CO2 for/ every kilo o】f me/at produced.Bulk out mea\ls with extra vegetables (lentil】\s and beans are a great addition to dishes such as sp【/a\g【hetti 【Bolo/】gnese a】nd stews), and consider having at least one day a w\eek【 where \you eat no meat a】t a【ll. &lsq【【】uo】】;Meaty&r【squo/; vegetab【les such as mush】rooms and aubergines 】are gre/at alternatives【 t】o use o/n/ thes】e days 【and 【there ar【e plenty of r【ecipes online f\or hearty vegetarian】 dinners. Dishes that use lots of spic/es and herbs\ c\an【 als】/o help mask the absence of meat, as you’ll be \t\oo busy enjoyi/ng the bold flavou【rs to mis【s it.\Rel/ated |How to have\ a sustainable su/mm】er b/bqCh\o】ose m/eat tha【】t’s been produ【ced ethicallyWhen buyi【ng mea【t, opt for liv【esto/ck pr】od\uced by ethi\cal/ farmers usi】ng s【maller-scale methods that promote the welfare \of the an】ima【l【.【 This means avoi/\din【g【 in】tensi】【/vely【 farmed animals, which are simply bred for the highest output and profit possible and are often pumped full of a】n【ti\bi/otics (something whi/ch is incre】asin】gly becoming a t//hreat to human hea\lth). Look f】【or meats with a cre/dib【le animal welfare certification to\ pu/t your min/【d at rest. Local produce bought at place/s such as【 farm shops, org/\anic st】ores or go【od q/u/ality butchers are usual】ly re\a】red with【 t\hese 【ethic【al g】uidelines in mind.Relate\d【 | Top 7】 orga【nic res】taurants in L\on/donChoose me\at from livestock fed from l】ocal s】our】cesMany animals \re\are【d f\or their m】eat【 are fed on plant pro【tein】s that are 【/gro/\wn specifical】ly/ for this purpose \and imported. Sadly/, huge swath\es of land in/ coun/tries such as Brazil and Paraguay h【ave been impacted by t\his】 &\ndash; w\ith forests b\eing cut 【down and co/mmunitie/s moved to make way for crops. 】To lessen your environmenta【l footprint, choose meat \from liv】es【toc】k\ that have\ been /given a diet from【 lo/cal and home-grown fo【o\【d \sou】\rces. This c\uts down the enviro【nmental impact of transpor\ting feed. Those that are \fed on/ crop by-pro】ducts and food waste, rather than\ food specifically grown for】】 them, a/re much mor/e s【/us【tainable too\. Pasture-fed a】nimals also he\lp keep carbon in the】 s】oil – a/no\ther environmental b/oon\.Rela【ted | \This】 【farm-to-table rest】aura】nt has【 b\een\ f】ully booked 】sin/ce its 【la/unchUse every p\art of the meatWaste less by using ever\y part /of the produce you bu\y – 】carcass【 a/nd all. Foo【d \wastage is a huge probl/em and】 it’s【 b【eli【eved【 that】 acro\ss the wor/ld househol\ds are \throwing aw【ay aroun\d 57【0,00】0 】tonnes of fr】esh meat each year (according to the\ book Farm\aged\don, that&rsquo【;s the equivalen【t of 50\ million chickens, 1.5 m【ill/ion pigs and \100,000 cows \&nda\sh\; //an 】unbelievabl】y h【igh amount).Animal\ bones, 【for example, can make amaz【ing stock \for s】oups and broths,/ a【nd thin【gs like chicken skin (which many people remove) tastes 【delicious when crispy. A【lso consider/ buying some of the /lesser-used】 cuts of meats f【】【rom your local butchers, /which help】s 】them\ waste】 less of the 【ani/mals they buy. 【Chicken th/ighs are more】 f\lavoursome】 than bre\asts (e】ven though the l/】atter tend t】【o be more pop/ular) and co\oked well, 【offal\ can be very【 appetising.Don&/r/squo;t forget to use you\r/ fre】e】zer too &nda/sh; 】you can freeze leftover portions of home\-cooked meals, or eve】n h\alf a pack of mince or an【 od】d ch【icken brea】st i\f you /don&r【squo;t \think yo\u’ll need i/t all immediately. Just remember to defrost a】nd cook th【e meat properly, and ideally 【don’\t leave it in/ /your free\zer fo】【r longer than【 t/】hree【/ months.Wo\rds: Clai/re\ MunningsShar【e th】i\s article / Mo/re from wellness,/ 2018 at 5】:35\am PDTWh【e\n did Szi【get really【 start focusing on s】ustainability? What cam【e first &n】d//ash; the demand for/ sustaina【bility fr/om the visitors or /your own s】ense/ of //responsibilit】y?"The latter and it started a v】ery lo\ng time ago. M\an/agement m\ade t\he\ decision to make gre【at】er efforts in terms of sustainability in 2002】 an【d I jo\ined in 2003 to start \working on it. Back then sustainability【 at f/estival【s was mostly co】nfined /t\o was\te manag\ement but【 over the/ years we began to develop a wi\der ran】ge of activit\ies in various spher\es【 of the f】estival."What ste/ps hav\e \you taken in the 【pa【st few yea\rs to/ become more green and what【 can we】 \/expect this y【ear?"I thi【nk that the big/\ge\st neg/ative effect of the festival is waste so ou\r prio\ri/ty is re】ducing and recycling waste, thi】s is ou\【r flagship en\vironmental project. Through the years, we focused mostly on r/ecy/cling【 but s】ince la【st yea\r m】ade huge step t\owards actu/ally re【ducing was】te. We don’t allow pla/stic bags 【【to be sold a【【t the fest/ival/ an/d\ th\e food vendors cannot give out plas\ti\c】 plat】es or /cutlery (i【\t must be made of biodegradable material). Last /yea】r we launched a /new c/ampaign to r\educe the number 】【/of /straws and\ managed to cut use by 50%."S\ziget\】 Festival's "Don'【t Suc\k!】"【 camp【aignKris】】z/ta Csányi"\We also try to pro\tect the gro/un【d and soil by c/over【ing 1】【0,000sq. meters with special covers and then recultivate it. Last /year, f/o【r example,/ we recu】ltivat/ed about 3 a】cres.【 We are also\ constantly experimenting with and】 implementing wa】ter saving】 【【te【chniques such as vacuu/m 【to【ile/t】s/ whi/ch can sa】ve 85% of 【w】ater use \(i/.e. 1.5 liters of water p\er flush instead 】of】 10 liters).""We are a\lways thinking of mo【r/e n【ew campaigns to【 save water./ Last year we employed /a/\ “gu\err\il\la” awarene】ss campaign and found that through some easy】 communicat【【ions \measures we \can enc/ourag】】e\ visitors who are c】amping to shower mor\e eff【iciently. 】/We a【lso \】had /workshops with Cli/mate-KIC alumni】 /in t/he previo】us years and al\w/ays have the\se trash【 fas\h\ion workshops where peo/ple can m】a【k】e festi【va\l accessories \【out o/f waste. T/his year, we have even more sustainability ini\tiatives in \store, whic】h\ w】e will announce on Eart/h /Day (April 22/nd)!"Trash Fas【hion wor【kshop at Sziget FestivalSziget Festival"Those who like t/\o camp at festivals ca【n】 //opt【 for resting their wary bo【dies at the EcoCamp, a special【ized camp\site on the festival g】round】s that uses solar 【】p】ower \and\ boa/st】s】 a slow /food bar that encour【ag【es peop】le/ to live a slow a/n/d sustainable life."Eco C/】】a】mping at Sziget Fest/】ival\】Sz】iget FestivalSolar pow/er at Sziget's Eco\ Cam】pin\g groundSz/iget Festival"Be】/cause /tran\sport\ is 】resp\onsible for a【 very significant part of /a fes【tival’s carbon footprin\】t, we&rs\quo;v/e undertaken a lot of different tactics to re\duce the n】egative/ effects: we offer\ bu\ses/ and boats /to the fe\stival\, provide bike facilities and actively dis】c/ourage visitors thr】ough variou】s c【ampaigns from dri】vi\ng their】 cars here.】""Another in/itiative that /we've had over the pa/st few years w/as 】encouraging pe】ople to \donate their tents to【 charity because it&r】s\quo;s actu/ally a huge issue on a European level. Tons o\f tents a/nd oth/e\r camping】 gear are left behind at festivals so this way we \t\ry to collect them and give away\ to char/ities, like t\he H】ung/ar\ia】n Charity Servi/ce of t/h\e Order of Malta."Tent donation pointSz/\ige【【t FestivalAre【 there any other festivals out ther/e that are】 】really leading the way and can be considered ro【le m】o/dels】 】in \the sphere of s\ustainable party\ing?"There】\ is a /clear/ tendency of【 introduc\i\ng green efforts at \most festivals: we&rs\qu【o;\r【e see】ing a kind of “green&r】dquo; 【】】compe\tition because /th\e y【ounger generat/ions is putt\ing huge press【ures on the festival industry to /be m【o【re sustainable. Glastonbury bann\ed plas\tic bottle/s and】 】we'd like to fo/llow 】【suit in the fut】u/re\."Workshop at Szi】get Festival's "R【\e】cycling C【e/nter"Sz【iget Festival"Many festi\vals are exp\erim\ent\ing with energy effici】ency projects but,【 unf\ortunately, 】so far there\ ha【【s been【 no 【b\reakthro/ugh because festivals 【simpl】y need A【 LOT【 /of】 energy. Last year we used s【ola【r energy t\o power our illuminated banners【 but, of 】【cou\rse\, that’s a\ miniscule percenta】ge of\ the energy a fes/tival requires. On a】 larger scale, solar is 【sim】ply not\ viabl/e at the moment because turnover is 10-20 years, whils/t a festival only lasts several day\s to\ a we】】ek, \in /th【e 】ca】se of【【 Sziget. So, as an industry, we&rsq\uo;re very fa\r /away fr/om being able to use 【s/ol】ar to fully power a f【estiva】l【’s/ needs\."What role, in your opinion, do festival organiz】ers /have in shaping a genera【l 】“gr/een consciousness” /【among their att】ende】\es?"Huge. We all agree 【on that. Festiva】ls have \】a huge impact\ on yo】u/th. When people come to/\ a fest【ival they open their minds t\o le【arning and experienci/ng new thi\ngs. So there’s a【 con//sensus th/a\】t we d【o have a hu【ge 】responsibility/ to in/crease \environmental aw/are【ness."Waste Po\int at Sziget Fest【ivalKriszta /Csány/iWhat tips/advice/ would you giv【e【 attendees to enjoy themselves in a more sustainable way at Sz/iget 2019?"Sm\o】kers &nd【as【h; don’t throw【 】cigarette butts away o\n the ground, always look for a mo\bie ashtray. Find y\o【ur m【o\st environmentally friendly way to co【me to the fe】stival 【(【boat, t【rain, bus or even cyc】le) and use our rec【yc/li\ng/ 【bins."Share this a】rticl【e More from lifedeNd

XPlASea chan/ge: how one small str/etch【 of c】o【【as\tline \in Italy transformed it【self \ZYYf

Protecting life in the Arcti\【c seas

hiqVWhat【 might loo/k 】li/ke an ordi/nary offshore w】indmill to th/e u/ntrained eye,/ i\s actually】 somet/hing quite diffe/rent.T\his turbi/ne has been designed with 】a special telescopic technology that r】eportedly allows for a faster\【\, more efficient/ and\ cheaper\ instal\l【atio\n with【】in the ma【rine\ environment, according to its developers, Sp】anis\h 【】\engineering company】, EST/EYCO.Se\lf-Instal/ling】 Turb/i】ne Protot】ype Takes Final 【ShapeJust half-a\n-hour by /boat fro【m the is/】land's main p\ort, this offshore prototy【pe t/】oo/k almos/t 4 years/ to【 become a real\ity.And this dream was rea/l【ised through the ELICA【N projec【t - a three-y】ear undertak【ing, co/-finan\ced by the】 European Commission un【der the\ir Hor【izon 20【20 progra】/m for Research & Deve】lopment, which aims \to innovate and design greene/r types o\f ene】rgy.W【/ith /the EU'/s t\arget to go c】arbon-neutral by 2050, these types 】of /projects are ex/actly w/hat w/i【ll be n】eeded if that /targ/et \is to be /】m/et and a 【】Gree【n Revo\lut【ion in E】urope is/ to be/ ac\hieved【.But what makes\ these wind turbine/s /so unique?Well/, according to one of its eng】in【eers, it is\ the way/ it was bu/ilt and install【ed."/This prototype has two big systems. One is【 the /botto\m /foundation pla\tform/ \that allows the b【al/last of th/e system dow【n in the seabed. The other one is\ its/ auto-lifti/ng system. This allows the tower to/ be telescoped and the turbin/e raised into it\s final po\sition." 】 / / 【 【 /【 \ Ju【an Man//u/el Sanche/z Herrero \ / \ Mining Engineer, \ESTEYC\O 】 】 】 【 A/ccording to the devel\opers\,\ the /installation costs h\ave been reduced \by 35 per cent compared to 】those need/ed by/ ordinary of】fshore windmills, for which foundat】ions,\ t】ower, tur】bine and b【lade】/s have to be ass\em\bled at\ the fina【l\ l\ocation.Desig【ners say the whole system was conceived to be easily scaled up to the bigger, f】ar mo】re】 po】werful \【turb【ines 【- up to 12 mega【watt【s - which are abo/ut t【o ent】er the mar/ket./Whatev【er the \size /of the turbine, researchers sa】y that】 the stability of thes/e offshor【e platfo/rms is the main challe\nge,【 with /one engi【neer d】escribing wind turbines\ as "a nightmare in【 terms of stability."Top offshore wind pow\er pro\ducers in EuropeAl\on】】】g wi/th further i【mprovin【g some \of th】e technical【 /confi/gurations, researchers are now looking at the【 /marke】t opportunities ahead.According to Javier\ Niet】o, the Offshore Division Manager at ESTEYCO, th】e 】aim i/s to b/uild bi/gg【er and/ more comme】rciall【y viable win/d turb】ine farms, which will conta/in fro【m 50 to 70 constructions e/ac【h.This tar\get is stil【l a long way off, h】e says, but the hope is that Europe can lead the way as inn/ovator 【on/ environmental policies and 【i/nspire other【 nations 【\and contine【nts to【 start going green, soone【/r, rather than later.Howe/ver, if these objectives can be ach【ieve】d, then Euro【pe wil\l \be 【one\ step closer to kickstarting the Green Revolu/tion that it s】o\ desires.12 】 / 【 / \ 】Futuris【 - El【ican】/ 】 / 】 \ 】 】 \ 【 Euronews \ 】 12 】】 】 \ \ 【 Fu【turi\s - E】lican 】 \ 【 】 】 / 【\ 】【 \ 【 】 】 【Eu】ronews 】 \ / 12 】 【 【 【】 】 \ 】 Futuris - El/ican \ 【 \ / / 】 【 】 】/ 】 】Eurone\w【s / \ 】】 【 12 / / 】 \ Futuris【 \- Elican \ \ 【 】 \ \ 】 \ 】\ 【 / / 】Euronews 】 \/ 12 】 / 】 \ / Fut】uris - Elican/\ 【 / 】 【 Eu\ro//n\ews \ / 】 / 】 】Share this articleCopy/paste the article vide【o embed l/ink below:】CopyS/hare\TweetSharesendShar\eTweetSharesendMor/eHide【ShareSendShareShareShareSendShareShareYou// m【ight also/ like 【 \ 【 H】ow c/an cemen】t factories be carbon-neutral by 2【050? \ \ / More /aboutRenewabl】e e】nerg\iesEnvir【onme\ntal /protectionEcolog\y 】 / Most vie/wed 】 Wh【at/ influenc\e on climate is the coronavirus lockdo\wn rea【ll【y having?/ 】 【 】 \ The new AI sys\tem safegua】r】ding pr\emature babies from】 i/nfection 【 \ 】 】 / Messeng/er RNA: the /molecule th/at may】 teach our b【odies to beat cancer 【 】 】 【 】 】 Apple and Goo\gle say they�【3;l【l w/ork \to/gether t】o t\race/ sprea/d of coronavirus via smartphones 】 H/\o\w/ EU fund\ing is【 ch/anging the face of L/atvian innovation 【 \ Browse to\day's tagsygp0

K47lT【ext size】AaAaW】ith a p【icnic packed sa//fe\ly in my bag, awa【y from the enquiring noses of the many dogs I me/t along 【the route, I\ set off ac【ross Far\thing Downs and Happy\ V】alley to \explore the South L/ondon Dow/ns with the promise of a pub at th/e end o/f my 4 km wa【\lk. Almost immediately, I【 had to 【ste】p aside for a/ ra\pidly approaching horse 】and rider as they scrambled up 】the \cha\lk【 emba【nkment. Spr\awlin\g/ vie\ws of forest】s\ and sheep-dot/【ted fields were my reward as I /completed the short walk from Coulsdon S\outh St【ation up/h\ill\ to r【each \th【e top of /Farthing Downs. There is n\o doubt you are still within Gr/eater L】ondon; the rigid archite/ctu/ral figures of the City are a /jarring sigh\t amo\ngst the soft hills that frame /\them. 】It doesn’t feel like it, though, as yo/u de\scend into th】e valley and the nature\ reser【ve/ be/gins to envelop you in its lu【sh remoteness.Takin\g a break in Devilsden Woods&c】【/opy; Helene Je【unet/Eurone/wsWhilst in the process of pla/nning my walk I had discover///ed that this co/llection o】f parks is made up of 】multiple】 S\ites of Spe】cial Sci\】entific In】\tere/st (SSSIs), ext/【remely rare/ 【chalk g\rasslands that can/ be as diverse in species as a r【ainforest. The London Wild】life\ Trust st【ates that, thanks to changes in land use, an estimated 80%】 of th/is habitat has been lost in the/ last 60 ye【ar/s.On the hottest da【y of 2019 so far and just a week befo\re my vi】sit, \a s【peci】al ceremony we\lco【me】d this collecti【on o】f green spaces into London&\rsquo;s col】le】c】tion】 】of NNRs. This【 417-hectar\e area【 is teemi】ng with an a】stonishing quant】ity of species; Natural England's 【Adam Wal/lace/ said at the event that【 "there are/ o/ver 40 species p\e\r\ s】quar【e metre of p【lants that exist on/ this sort of site and/ th【at supports a huge range \【of wildlife."In a】 press release, Nat/ural England highlights that th\is will be Lo\ndon's t\hird reserve, the second lar\gest after Richmon【d Park. \Its】 n\ew sta【tus as an 】NNR helps to 【pre/s\erve o\pportunities for t【h/e /385,0【】00/ res】ide\nts of Croydon to have contact with nature/ and connect on a 【more persona【l level wi】】th a 】wild\er side of Lond\on.It&【rsquo;s not only the/ res【id】en/ts of C/roydon, however, 】tha\t【 will benefit from the protection of th】is【 outdoor sp】a】ce. Just a 30 minute trai【n【\ ride /from Victoria Stat【ion, it al【so】 offers an easy escape\ from t\h\/e stuffiness of Central London.Rel【ated 】| Et/hiopi/a breaks W【orld Record by planting 350 million trees 】in one dayPicnic in Happy Va\lley&c】/opy; Helen J】eunet/EuronewsI sat down to enjoy my picnic on a benc/h surro】unded by this ra】re gra\【ssland, overlooking Happy Valley. On th\e way throug/h【\ /Coulsd】on, I had stopp】ed to see i/f I could find some b\o】ok】s to help with iden/t【ifying 【th】/e 【c\arpet o【f flowers tha】t now \e\n】vel/oped】【 \me and was rewarded with/ some vintage ch\ar【ity sho\p finds. /They ma】\y n/ot have been the most up-to-date/ guides【 but their gorgeous illustrati【ons were almost as captivating】 as the real th】【【ing\. T】he o【ld books【 ca\m【e with the adde/d 【bonus \that, once I was done with 】them, they 】could be donat\ed back to the shop for anot】her explo/rer to enjoy withou】t the waste of buying new.【Secondhand bo】o】\ks including flo【/wer an\d t】r/e】e identifi\cat/ion guides&co\py; Helene \Jeu】net/Eu】ronew/sEven in the middle of a weekday afte/rno\on】, I found people enjoyi\ng 】the reserve \at】 e/very po】int /in my wa/lk. /As I was \t】aking photographs, /one man p【asse\d com\ment /to a couple sat wi//th him, &ldqu】o;ar【en’t】 you/ goin/g to take any to/urist pictures?” It /transpir】\ed that th】ey w/ere visi/ting f\/rom 】Spain, and he】【 ha】d b\【rought them out/ to experience the re【markable pla/ce /in which he li\ved.】More tourists, this time【 an Italian family, s】top】ped to a/llow me to take their pic】t】ure a【s they【 cycled through th\e par\k. On the gras/s a l/ittle【 way ahead/ lay a c】hildren&r】squo;s activi/ty book wi\t//】h the scribbli【ngs of【 an e\/ager insect enthusia/st cove\r\ing 】the pag】e,\ its】 owner 】de\【eply engrossed in the【 identification o【f an uncooperative butterfly several me】tres away【. Outs】i/de of】 your】 usual wal【k\ing】 and】 cycling】 routes, Friends of Farthing Downs lists a considerable number of bridleways/ around thi/s area/ e】ncompassing 】a range of \difficulti/es that offer alt\ernative views o【f the reserve for the keen \equestrian.】Identify flowers amo\ng【 t【he vast wildflower meadows&【cop/y; Helene Jeunet/Euronew】sI/t is th【is /\kind of engag\eme\nt with the env\】iron\ment that Cro//ydon Council, the City/ of【 London C/\orporation and Natural Eng【lan【/d hope will encou【rag】e the 【local p\opu】lation, and t\hose from further afiel【d, to h\e\lp keep this vital natural resource intact. Nature re/】cov】ery is beneficia【l to improving na/tional health \b/ut also as a pot】ential defence against th\e future\ effects of c【limate \chang】e, ac】cording to Tony Juniper head of N】atural England.】Views 【across Happy Valley chalk g/r】asslands&co\p\】y; Helene Jeunet/Euron【ewsR【el\ated | "Love Water" c【a】mpaign t【o enc】ourage Britons to look aft【er /waterwaysCresting another hill, the encroaching 】housing estates signalled that I wa/s 】nearing the end/ of my w\alk. 】In a field just bef\ore the path came 【t/o an e【nd,\ I foun\d volun】teers in the process of h【elpi【ng to r【/estore plant 【【life after years of ove【rgrazing by sheep and \rabbits. I s\】at \and watch】ed /them for a\ while, 【considering how this change in【 status affected the real\ity of the local area’s role f/or】 the community. Turning/ the South L/ondon Downs i【nt】o\ an NNR doesn&r/squ/o;t n/e/cessarily cha【nge an awful lo/t about 【experiences of the area; i【t d【oes】n't add any 】flashy visitor centres o【r adventure playgro【und】\s. What it offers most practically is/ greater, mor】e【 cohesive protection\【 for the fl【ora and\】 f【auna that make it so /unique. In t\urn,【 protected green sp【aces offer chances for 【improved mental and physic【al health in【 local population】s. But what \else?Woodland path/ways of m\any different kinds&/copy\; 】Helen【e 】Jeunet/EuronewsInclusion of another loca/lly import】ant green space int】o the \grou【p of【 2【2 NNR\s that 【e/xist 【\across the\ UK rea/\l【ly se】emed important /as I watched the volunteers. At the ev/ent\ that /declared its new status, Int】erim Chief Execut【ive of Nat/ural E【【ngland【,【 Marian Spain called the ar\ea 'part of【 /a national set of jewels】 i【n】 \the\ c【rown.'N】NRs are \managed by Natural England on beh】alf o/f\ the】 nation, often /by vo\lunteers like those I saw, for the benefit of the】 public.】 They】\ are for all o\f us/ 【【to e\njoy, to bring our】se【lves per/\sonally closer to n【ature an/d perhaps to】 better appreci/ate【【 t【he diverse magnifi/cen】ce【 of /the e/nvironment. It offers /re/】al, material proo\f of\ posit/ive【 environmental impact by hu/mans, pro/【of that we can 【effectively look a【fter the world we live 【in if\ we approach it in small chunks. In the face \of increasi\ngl【y negativ/e n/ews surr/oundi\】ng the climate crisis, t【he 】pr\e【se\r\vation o/f these na\tio\nal】ly im【p】or\/ta/nt 】plac/es】 【】/off【ers a sense of hope. It is an advert fo】r collec【tive action; if /we all 【w【o】rk together/【, things can change for the better.A well】 earned dri】nk【 at The Fox pu】b&co\py;\【 Helene Jeunet【/Euro】newsWi\th a/ happy glow that only a few hours spent outside can bring, 【I rounded】 the f】inal corner to the end of my a\dventu\re, The Fox,【 an 18th century\ 】v\illage pub very m【uch\ a【t home in【 the\ picturesque rural surroundings】 that had so 【absorbed me for th\e la\st【 4 km\. T\he p】ub was anyt\hi】ng but Vic\torian \in its offerings【【 with a vegan menu 】available, something I took full advan【tage of and ordered a dairy\ free\ d\esert to /coo/l【 \me d\own. I retired to the gent】le sun \of t/he busy】 g\/ar【den【, cold drink and coconut ice cream 】in hand, fee/ling tired but】【 satisfied with my Frid\ay【 afternoo\n escape 【from the city.Share this article 】 More from p【lacesrib4

f71iWhat can your smartphone do for nature?ComA

dykdText si【zeAaAaThe common hippo】p【o/ta/mus is know\n for th\eir /rapacious appetites and spending a lot /of/ time/\/ in water, no wond】e【r, 'river hor【se is the literal En】glish translation o\f【 the Greek word Hipp【opotamus/. T\hey spend up to 16 ho/ur/s a day submerg】e【d in rive/rs and la】kes to keep their massive bodies cool under th/e hot African sun. And in t//he rest of /their】 time? They consume】\ bet/ween 25-40 kilos of grass.And with【 these two \act【ions, they already do a lo【t for th/ei【r env/iro【nmen/t. A recent study b\/y /University of Antwerp 】biolo】g\ist J\onas Schoelynck and his/ 】col/leagues, published in Scienc【e Ad/vances found hippo/' daily hab【its pl/ay a key role in maintainin/g】 e/co】syste【ms. Th\【e scientists fo】und out about their key r/ole【 by/\ /】analysing s/ample/s from the Mara R\iver, which runs throu【gh t】he Maasa/i Mar【a National Reserve, a savann\ah in Kenya.The mam//mal】s living in this park are protected, h【oweve】r\, ou/tsid/e o】f t】hese a/r\ea/s scient/ist\s sa/y h\ippo numbers/ are down. The IUCN Red \List describes the hippos as vulnerable and now scientists are war/ning 【tha】t t\h/e dw【indling number of hippos across A/fr\ica/ \is potentially harmful to the continent's /rivers and la/k】es.Clic/k on the video a/bove to see how hippo\s make th】e ecosystem run around them.Share this article More \/f】rom pl】aceswjj3

rzzG\President Donald Trump】 says he has issued a directive to halt U【S pay\ments 【to t\he\ World Health \【O【rganizatio\/n.T】/he funding wi【ll】\ 【cease pending a review of WH/O's \warnings abo\ut/ the coronavirus\ and C/h/i】na.Trump sa/y【s 】the outb】reak could h\av/\e been contained at its sou【r【ce and spared lives had the U\N health a】gency done a better 【job inv/estigatin【g reports comin\g out【 of China.Trump cl【aims th/e organisation failed \to carry】 out its ///&ldquo\/;bas【ic dut/y&r【dquo; and】 must 【be held accountable.Shrinki【n】g of UK economyEarlier o【n【 Tuesday th/e UK's /tax and spending watchdog/ has s/aid the British econ【o\my \cou【ld shrink\ by 】a record 35 percent】 by June. The bl】eak report come【s fro【m the\ Office for Budget Respo】nsibil/ity.Com/menting【 on the g【\overnment's resp\onse /to the crisis, Finance Minister Rishi Sunak sa\id the measures p】u【t/ i\n p\lace w/ere the \"right p/lan".View his news conference in the video p/l/【ayer aboveOffi】ci【al statistics on Tuesday showed t\/hat hun【dred】s of deaths in British car【e homes have not been in】cluded i【n】 govern【【ment f】igures -- which only /take\ account of death/s in hospita\ls. I】【t【 has led to crit/ic/ism that the eld/erly ar\【e being "airb\rushe】d \/ou】t".Sunak insist【ed that the country's【 battle against coronavi/rus was "n\ot a\ choice between health 【and economics". Other 【key \developments:The/ Internationa/l Mone】tary Fund (IMF) sai】d in its】 latest forecast t/hat the w【orld econo\my would suffer its worst year since the Grea\t Depression of the 1930s \-- and shrink by thre/e percent in/ 20/20.US Presiden】t Donald 【Trump has defende/d his administra/tion's handling 【of the【 pan【demic】, saying he has "to】ta【l power" t\o li】ft the lockdown\ if need be.France\ /and India hav\e jo/ined Italy in/ extending their nationwide lockdowns to stem the spread of the deadly 【nove\l coronav【irus】.These decisi【ons come as the/ number of infec\tions【 worldwide near the two mi/llion threshold. Nearly 120,000 people have【 now lost 【/th\eir lives 】to COVI/D-1/9】.】Foll\o】w all the latest updatesShare thi/s articleCopy/paste the a\rticle【 vid】eo embed \lin/k below:Copy】ShareTweetS】h【aresendShareTweetS/ha【res【endMo/reHi\de\ShareSendShareShareShareSe【ndShar/eSh\a/reYou might also like / / / Rising populism sto【kes disco\ntent but offers f\ew solutions to】 global thre【ats like COV\ID-1【9 ǀ View 】 【 【 / \ C/ould a ce】ntury-old met/hod 】help treat COVID-】【1 pa】tients? 【 】 \ \ \ \ 】 / How to s】tay healthy\ working from h】【ome, according to chiropractor\s\ 】 【 More aboutC】O】VID【-1CoronavirusEuro【pean Un\ionHot Topi】cLea/rn more about / Coronavir\u\s Hot TopicLearn more about 【 Coronavirus \ Brow/se【 tod】ay】9;s tags5Egq

jE11Small】, independent fisheries are slo\w/l【y making 】their return after almost being wiped 【out by Denma【rk【's d\ecisio】n to privati\se f\ishing 【qu】\【otas a 【de\cade a/go【, whi/ch allowed big companies to assert their d】ominance in/ t】he f/ishing market.The\ EU\&rsqu/o\;s Common \Fish\eries Policy le】ave\s it up to member states to decide how to allocate i\t//s n【】ational fi】shing qu/ota 】to\ its fishing fle\et.With market prices】 skyr\ocketing】, small fis】heries 】were pushed to sell the/ir \boats and leave the 【trade.So/me fishe\rmen say】【 the beam t\r\awl/ers also】】 had a de】t/rim【ental 【environmental impact b】y\ damaging seabeds.】W\orking /to】/getherF\ish【ermen in the North W/estern town of Thorups】trand decided it was time to take actio【n 【to /ensure their to/wn】, an/d oth【er /fishing vil】lage\s weren't wiped【 off the map by the quota sys\】tem.Cooperatives were es/ta】\blis\hed to all【ow fishermen to band t】ogether, bu/y\ and share quotas【 am\ongst t/he\mselves】.T/h】is also ensured traditional boat making, a D\anish i\con /】sin【ce the Viki】\ng【 ti】mes, has been able 【t】o thrive\ on【ce mo/re.The European\ Union has also seen the potential in this\, partially fun\ding a boatyard to build vessels and t】rain n/ew craftsmen, in turn\ cr\】e【ating local opportunities f\or ele\ctricians an\d engi/neers, as well as an 【attr【action for tourists.S】mall sc\ale fishin/g【 in Eur\opeThe European Union recog【nises the i【mp】ortance of small 】scale/ fi】she/【【ries \acr\oss the con/tinent, invest/ing an es】timated 212.4 million Eu】ros (the /estimated total\ p\ublic budget】 target【ed on small\ scal【e】 fisheries, EMF】F) into various projects ov】er 】20】14-2020.In the Me【diterranean and Black Sea /regions, small s\cale fisheries repres【ent over 80% of t/\he】 t【o/tal fishing fleet a】nd】 employ over 60% of t【he to【ta/【l workforce within the sector.\Cat\ch of【 the dayWith sustainable sea\fo】o【d a gro/wing food t/rend, Thorups【tran\d 【/has set up shop in one of the world's cul/in/ary capit\als.The】 town has entered th】e lucrative Copenhagen market,】 selli【ng fresh fis/h on a】 co\n\verted【】 boat in the heart of the city centre\.Ch【ef Simon Biggas M&o【slash\;【lle【r say\s\ /he hopes Thorupstrand will help to inspire ot\her to【wn\s to 【follow 【suit and】 embrace sust【a【inable f/is】h【ing coop/e】ratives.12 】 【 OCEAN EP5 - Smal【【l scale fishe\ri】es / \ / 【 】 12 / \ 【 / / 】 OCEAN EP5 - Small scale fisher】ies 】 / 】 1【2 】】 / 【 OCEAN EP5 - S【mall s【cale fisheries \ 【 / 【 12 】 【 \ / OCEAN \/EP5 - Smal/l scale f\isheries 【 / \】12 】 OCEAN EP5 - Small scale fish\er/ies 】 】 【 【 / 12 \ 】 】 【 \ 【 / OCEAN EP/5 - Small scale //fisheries 】 / 】/ / \ 12 【【 / 】【 【/ /\ 】 】 OC【EAN EP5 - Small s【cale【 fish/eries \ 【 【【 / 】 12 【 OCEAN EP5 - Sm/all 】scal\e/ fisheries 】 12 / \ 】 / \ / \ OCEAN 【E/P5 - Small scale /fisheries \ \ 】 \ / 】\ Journalist na\me • Denis 】Loct/ierVi\deo ed【itor • Je【an-Christophe Marca】】udShare/ this a】rticleCopy/paste the article video em】bed link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendSh/a【r】eTweetShares/endMoreH/ideShareSendShare】ShareSha/reSendShareSh\are】You might also like 【【 / / / Acti】vists 】are raising \funds to save Da【ni【sh woo】den boats \ More /】aboutF\isheryEnvironmen/tal pr【otec【ti】onDenmark 【 Most viewed / / What influence o【n climate is the coronavirus 【lockdown\ r/eally\ havin/g? 【 Th【e new AI system sa\feguardin】\g premature babies fro】m infection / \ 】 Messen】ger RNA: the molecule th/at/ may【 teach o】ur bo/d】\ies to bea\t cance\r / 】 【 】 \ \ / \ \Apple/ and Google sa【y they/'ll w//ork together to trace spread of coronavirus /via smartphones\ 【 】 【 】 】 How EU fund\in/g is changin【g the face of L【atvi】an innovation Browse t】oday's tagsM3VS

axaDTex/t sizeAaAaOn【e in four workers】 would take a pay cut to /do/ w】ork that&rsquo\;s bett】er \fo】r the envir/onment, a】ccor/din】g to new【 re【search 【by【/ careers sit【e Totaljobs. That figu/re rises t【o half among millennials, aged\ 23-38.】Al\so known as Generation Z, mi【llennials told res】earchers they’】d be wi【lling t【o /drop &pou\nd;11,0 from their 【salaries o】n average【. That compare\s to £3,800 \Genera【tion X respond】ents【 aged b】etween 39-54 said they’d be willing/ to forgo for a g/reener j】ob role.In the UK, the\ surv【ey found 60% of j【obs】eekers resear\ched a potent/ial\ employe】r’/s sustainabilit\y and 】environme】nt cr\edentia/ls before/ accepting a positio】n. M\eanwhile, \f\our in every five empl【oyees【\ though\t comp\anies had/ a re【spons【ibility to lo\o/k after /the【 environment,【 with thre【e\ in【 f】ive agreeing their employers should be /【do】ing more.Read more | Noughti\e/s\ rap legend Akon to build gre/en cityA\roun/d th/e same amou/nt were\ willing to accept cuts in sp】【ending on activitie\s like team lunche\s, furniture an【d events.Environment\ attitudes inspi/red by David Att】enb/orough an\d Greta ThunbergSome 18% of wo【rkers/ in g\en/eral an/d 34% mi/llennial【s reported\ that they \would refu/se t【o work for a company 】they thought wa\s har】ming the natural world. The majority said they w】ere m/ore interest【ed in cl\imate issues】\【 than t】\hey wer\e five years ag\o, sayi【n/g a hig/her profi【le【 in the\ /media ha\d drawn【 their attenti【on.Greta Th\unberg】 arrives \in Spain for】 COP 25Copyrigh\t 2019 \The Associated Press.】 All r/ights reservedPedr【o RochaT\he influen【ce of n/at\ural】ist a\nd broadcaster Sir【 David Attenb【orough and young ac【tiv】ist G【reta Th/unberg were 】also cited as key drive/rs for pe】opl【e to\ cut their carbon footprint.“It has ne\ver bee【n more \i/mportant f/\or busi【nesses to be 【par\t of th】e solution to 【our pl】anetary /c【rises,” said Gudrun \C/artwright, envi【ronment d\irector 】at Bus】iness i【n the Community.【&ldquo/;Young people are no 】long】er begging leaders 】to 】change but tell】ing them /that cha/nge is comi\ng re\gardles【s. Businesses that i】gno】re\ it /face an imminent\ exis\te】ntial threat. Our futures depend on \rapid,【 】ambit/ious action, and we can all make a differen【ce.”Sh【are this article More from li\feBnnF

ByIX“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207More preparation time and p\eople obeying \con/finem/ent measures has helped Portugal manage its co【ronavirus o/ut/break, it's been claimed.Por】tugal h\as vastly di】fferent COVID-19 in【fecti\on and death rates/ com【pared /to【 n\eighbouring Spain, one of the \worst hit countries.【 Pulmonologist Dr【/ F/ilipe Froe】\s, an advisor to health chief Graça Frei】tas, said/ Portugal ha/d 】benef\i/ted 】f【rom being【 b/ehind Madrid in【 t/erms of the virus\'\ spread. Th\is, he adde】d, had given the/ country time to get hospitals ready【】 and \increase capacity in inte\nsi\】ve ca【re units."The differ【enc】e 【in Portugal was that we/ had more time to/ prepare," Dr Froes told Euronews' Good Morning Europ/e 【sho】w."We think we are three weeks behind】 Italy 】and pe】rhap【s one w\e/ek a/【【nd a half \behind Sp/ain, s】o thi【s gave【 us time,\ precious days, to prepare.\ I】 think\ the main differ】ence was\ also the early e/【n\gag\ement of primary ca\re physicians."Portugal】 declared 【a state of emergency o】n 18 March, just two da/ys after 【】the first COVID-19 deat【h wa\s reported.At the t/ime of【 】\writing, Portugal has confi】rmed 535 C】OVID-19 deaths, w\hich wo【rks out as 52 per one million】 o】f population.\ In Spain, m/ore than 18,000 have been /killed by the disease, giving it a r\ate of 385 fatalities for【 【each one milli【】on in\hab【itants.Madr\id's i\nfection rate is also double that of Lisbon's, al\though this measure can be skewed by ho【w muc\h 【test/ing a country c\arries out.Fr【eitas, Portug】a\l's \director general for health【, said /88 per c】ent\ of t/he country's confirmed ca\ses a/re s\taying at hom【e an/】d don'】t /re【/qu\i/re\ hospit【al treatmen/t. 【】"T】he \hospitals are not overwhelm/ed and we /have more t】ime【 and more [better] cond【itions to follow the c\ritical pat】\ients in the ICUs," she said."The data we have indicates that the maximum of our po/【tential ha【s not yet been r】eached,\ which reflects the evolution o\f /the epidemic.\"'【Unsurp/asse/d civic\ spirit'A study from t【h/e Nova Universit\y of 【Li/sbon indi】cates /the reproduction of C】OVID-19 in/ Port/ugal was 【 the low】es\】t in Europe during the first 25 day【s of the epidemic.Dr F/ro】es believes/ citizen ob\edien/ce has been cru\cial in 【prev】enting further spread 】of \the vir\us."【Most activities are closed,【 such\ as s【chools and commerci】al activiti】es, a/nd most people 【are 】usua\lly\ following the rules and we apply the \recommendations of th\e governmen【【t/," h【e 】said.Eduardo Cabrita,\ Portug\al's minister of in/ternal a】dmini/strati/\on, sai【【d Por【tuguese citizens 】showed "unsurpassed civic spirit" in com【plying with regulations\ over the 】Ea】ster weekend."S\ecur】it【y f/orce/s report very \lo】w levels of circulation of citizens \an\d widespr【e/ad a】dherence to recommend【at】i/ons."On Friday, Presi\dent Marcelo Re//】belo de】 Sousa pr/oposed /extending the national lockdown/ beyond 17 April, until 1 M/ay.Bu\t d【espite promising s【igns】, officials 【are/ warning it may st\ill be 【early to【 【e\val【uate Portugal's【 response to the coro/n【a】virus."The are/a of &\#8203;​housin】g 】in \residentia】l homes a【nd their workers】 is identified as o【f 】particular【 c【once/\rn 】and priority【 for a【ction【," said Cabrita.\Authorities fear the/ d\isease could sp】read rapidly through【 care homes as it【 has in ot/her/ parts of Euro\pe.B【ut Portug】al has take/n huge steps \to 】co【ntain the vi】rus, repatriating around 4/,000 citizens f\rom abro/ad.The Portug【uese go】v\ernment has also gran/ted citiz\en】ship】 rights/ to mi【grant\s and asylum seekers who have residency applications underway.The move was intended 】to ensur/e】 mor\e \people】 in the countr【y c/an access】 so】c】ial security and health care】.Share 】this/ articleCopy/paste 】/t/he article video embed\ link below:CopyShareT】w\【eetSharese【n/dShareTwe\etSharesendMoreHideShar/eSendShareShareShareSe/ndShare【Share【You might als/o lik】e 】 Coronavirus】 in Europe: Latest numbers o【n【/ COVID【-1【9 cases and deat\hs / 【【 / 】 】 / 】 】 \ \ Coron/avirus【 /in Eu\rope:【 Spain allows part】ial re】turn to wo】rk as casu【alty figures im/prove 【 \ \ 】/ 】Co【ronavirus【: Portuga\l/ 【grants temporary citize\nship /rights to migrants 【 【More aboutPortu/galCoronaviruslockd】ownEmer/genc【ySpainC【OVID-19Hot TopicLearn more\ about Coronavirus】 】 Hot\【 TopicLearn more about / 】 Coronaviru/s Browse toda/y\9【;s tags 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tags7R1P

rR5NT\ext sizeAaAaFr【【om food 【wast/e to/ woodchips, a wide sel【ec/tion of surprising 【raw material】s can end\ up s【erv/ing as an alternative to plastics. Th】ey can be biodegradable in/ just a few months or even c/ompostable as opposed】 to the synthe\tic plastics, which stays \with us fo\r sev【eral【【/ h】\undreds【 of years in 】the\ landfills and release\s a lo\ng list of toxic che【mi\cal【/s /into our env【iron\m/ent. Rec/ycling can help ease some of these proble/ms\, but th【e be】st solution seem\s to 【repla/ce t【hem with more eco-f】ri【endly m】aterials】.However, some bi】od/egradable plastic has already attracted critical rem\a【rks, such as the one made from hemp and/ co\rn starch 【a【mong ot/hers. There are debat/es that pro\ducin】g these can resu/lt in a】】n even /greater amount】 of pollutants】,【 due to the pro\d】uctio/n with fertilizer【s and pe【sticides as well as the chemical p/rocessing】 nee【ded to】 turn organic material int\o plastic./Living 【it m\ade a selection of【 some recent】\ innovation/】s, w/hich need no land 【and no pesti】cides t\o produce,/ 【as ma/inly usi【【ng what is given by nature.Fr【om seaw\eed to biod//egradable plasticLiv】ing it rep\orted 【earlier\ abo【ut researchers, who have devised a possible solution/ for dur\able plastic waste, 】i/nspired\ b\y the oce//an. Scienti【sts \at Tel Aviv Univ】ersity have created a biodegradabl】e plastic by cultivating natural polymers made by micro-organisms t/h】at feast on 】se【a【weed al\gae.Or【/ganic plastics f/ro/m avocado s\eedsAvocado seeds are a h/uge industrial /waste 【in Mexic】o, henc】e a lo\cal c【ompany/ came【 up\ 】wi【th th/\e idea of【】 giv【i\ng 【them a \/second life\ as biodegrad/ab/le plastic. Biofas】e today produces /avocad【o【 seed 】stra【ws a//nd cutler\ies. Accor/ding to th\em, as i/t is foo【d w】aste, it/ reduces the costs/, so\ th】ey claim that they\ can produ\ce it for th\e same pri】c\e as】 regula【r palstics.The precious material in l】o】bsters' exoskeletonS/he\llfish, such as lobste【rs, could o/ffe/r a solution to the scourge of si【ngle-use plastic thanks to a bio-polymer in their shells called chitin. 】A London/-based startup The Shellworks is developi【ng\ a met】hod to transform thi/s material -】 normall/y destine】d\ for the 】rubbish\ /\ti【p - 【into】 a novel bioplastic that/'【s\ both biode/grada】ble and recyclabl】e.Click on t【he video a】bove to learn h【ow l/o【bst/ers can provide an alternative \for single-use p\lastic.Share this\ article More from life6CdF

q4hdWatch: British sculptor cre\ates a【 /marine e【xhibition\ in Tuscany\XcVY

zWCbThe Eu/rop【ean Union 】h\as stepped i】n to help small /fi【】shing/ communities 】preserve/ their way of】 life, as y\oung people t\urn away from the job that their for】ebears 】d\id/ for generations.T【he Swedish-/speaking i【s】land commu/nity of Pellin/ki in southern Fi\nland is typical of those t/h【e EU 】is trying to hel/】p.For gen\erati】ons, fishing has been a respec/ted trade an】d a traditio/nal way of life for man/y famili/es. But today, t【he number of local fishers is dwindling. Only a few remain\.One r【e\ason is 】dec【l【/\ini【ng catch】es. The fishers blame an in】cr/easing number of 【predators: seals and cormorants \/】damage the c\age\s and dec】imat\e\ f\ish\/ 【stoc】ks.Good c\atches are no longer guaranteed, and t/\he\】 e】conomic surviv【【al of family-r】un fisheries is becoming increasing\ly uncer】tain.M\ost chil\dren from fi【shin\g families make 】a 】safer choice】 to/ leave/ home and study s【ometh【ing else.As their parents age and】 retire, small-sc/ale fisheries, once\ 【typical in Finland, \go ou【t /of busi/ness. Nationwide, the /numbe【【r of professional fishers ha】s decli\【ned in recent decades/ from 10 to aroun】d 400.【Twen】t/y-se\v】en-year-old Marie Kellgren has been fishing full-time fo/r m\or/e than four years, alt【hough she acknowl/edges that there are no】】t man\y like her."We&/rsquo;re \not m\any - young peop\le \fishing】. \I think 】it’s because it’s 【【physically hard wo【rk, and you don&rs【quo;t know for ho】w many years you c/an do \it. It's a bi【g risk to/ start."She in】itiall/y we【nt to stud】y t\ourism \in Helsink【i but then took up the op】por【tuni】ty of【 a local &ldq【uo;Master-【\【Apprentice" pr/og\ram to l【earn /t】he trade f\rom her /fat】her.\The】 EU-supported scheme provided a s\mall g】rant that allowed Marie to work for a year as an a/pprent】ice 】fisherwoman — without 】putting her fathe】r's business under any further fin】anci/a/l st【ra【in.My\ father 】is a fisherman, 【m\y father’s fat】her was 【a f【ish/erman, an【d my】 fathe】r's f【ather's father was\ a fisherman. /】 】 \ V】iking Kel\lgr/en 】 【 】 Her father, Viking, told Euronews: &ldq/uo;/】My fa\th【er is a fishe】rman, my 【father’s father w】as/\ a fi\sherman】, a\nd my father's f】at/h】er's \father was a\ fisherman. So M】arie/【 is the f【ifth gener】ation fishing here/."Th\e t\raining p/rogram included some th/eory an【d/ 】800 h】o】ur\s of fishing pra\ctice\."I lear】ned how to fish with nets and with trap\s, t/【o take care \of t】he fish, the catch, and to/ prepar\e, to 【salt a】nd to smoke and cold【-s】moke a\nd /make fishcake【s, and marke\tin【g, and all \o\ther st【uff about pay\ing 【b】\ills."The funding 【for the "Master-Ap【】p\rentice" pr\ogram wa【s pr\ovided main/ly by the Euro】pean Mar【itim【/e and Fishe】ri】es Fund, which supports generational rene/wal/】 in Europe's】 f/ishing sector. The idea came from \the local fishing comm\unity i\n Pellinki, when another aspir\ing fisherwoman, Tanja Åkerfelt, was struggling to enter the profess/ion."My fat/her didn&r【squo;t think th【at \was a 【go//od ide】a,” Tanja said. &ldq【uo;That&\rsquo;s when I had to 】talk to】 other fisher【m【en, won\de【r】in/g, how coul/d【 we do【 this.”O】ne /of the fishermen she【 sp/oke to was E】sko\ 】Taanila, who man】ages th/e pa/\rtnership /b【etw\een/ privat\e and public sto【ckhold】ers in】 the loc【al fisheries【【 se】ctor, kn【own as a FLAG &mdash】; Fis【heries Local Actio/n Group.Taanila came up with s/implified 】paperwork &mdash\; a formal【 contract and t/he 【tr\aining pr\og】ram\ for both the mas\t\er a/nd t【he\ appr\entice.Training a【 new 】fis【her costs around 6,000 e/ur/os. Esko says it's an ine【xpensive way to sustain【 professional fishing, which is the o】nly ye\ar-round econom】ic 【activity i/n the Pellinki are【a.T\h【e progr/am is helping to slo【\w the decli\ne of south\ern F/inland's fishing community — but/ it cannot reverse it.T【aanil\a 【said: &ldqu】o;Ever】y time 10 fis\hermen q【\uit, we get one or mos】tly two young peopl/e w\ho 】/are inte【re【sted in continuing."The progr【am has been running f【\or three years. Out of 15 app\rentices, 12 d【/ecided to \keep fishing professionally.That's a hi【gh succ【ess rat\e, but with the g/r】owing seal p】roblem and the fu】ture【 of fis/h s/to\cks uncer/tain,】 these/】 ef/for\ts might not be enough."We 】hav\e to get \new fisherme\n because/ the avera/ge age here is 60 years o/ld,&rdquo\; said Ta/an】il\a. &【ldquo;So if\ \we do nothing, 】it】 wi【ll】 //take only【 five or six years and everybody wil【l have quit. It is ve\ry important that\ we have a【 living fishery in【 ou/r coastal areas.】 Without tha/t,/ it c【ou\ld be a dead ar】ea. And that&\/rsquo;s not n【ic/e."Much furthe【r south, off the coast of the Belgian port of Ostend, the fishing 【tradition is thriving and u\【ndergoi/\ng/ a renewal.With its limite【】d coas\tline【 an/d only six d\oze【n\ fishing vessels, Belgium is\n't a big fi【\shing】 country /—】 but in coastal 【West Flanders/ province, f【ishing tradi】t/ionally played an importan【t role.A lo/cal maritime \scho\ol &ndash【; the Maritie【m\ Instituut Mercator – runs\】 a ded/icated training ship, \wh【ich was renovated with EU he\lp.Built\ in 1967/, the "Br【o\odwinner", /a beam tra/wler, was refi/tted to provide bett】er safety and a gr/eater level of comfort than on t\raditional】 ve\】ssels.Bart DeWae/gen\ar/e, \a teacher at/ t【he Maritiem】 Insti/tuut Mercat\or, said s】tudents get\ esse\ntia/l hands-【【on training. Most of th/em d\on't have the se【a in their blood."I 【think maybe 20 per】 ce\nt are from】 familie/s that did it bef】ore, and 80【 per cent don’t【 even know anything about it. The】\y come/ from big /cities lik【e Antwe/rp and 【B\russels, no\th】】i【ng to do\ with t【he s\ea.&rdq】uo;Stud【ent/s go on eight-hour f/ishing trip】s sta【rting \fro【m the age of 12. By\ 16, 】t】hey spend】 hal】f 】o】f th/eir school ti】m】e at sea.Along with var/ious f/ishing-related skills, they learn navigati/on and marine engineerin【g.Most are /seeking a job in the maritime\ sector,】 but not necessarily in the fis/hing industry, 】where the work is har/d and the/ risk of accidents high./Sami \Tebbouche\, a student, said: "Y】ou 】have to learn to sail the vessel on your own】. You have to wa【ke up at night to repair \t\he net/s. It's tough!"Another student, Seppe DeKinde】r, said the unpredictable n】ature of th】e job】 puts many young 【people off. Fishermen's salaries can be ver/【y high - or low, depe】nding on the catch."It&r【squo;s unp\redictable ho【w much】 you ca【/n earn\ sometimes. That&/rsqu\o;s why a lot 【of p】eople are uncerta【in i\f\ they rea/lly/ want to do it/】. And /also becau【se it’s really h】ard wo】rk. And a【 lot 【of p【eople \have k】i/d\s a/nd stuff, and they don&rsq/】uo;t want to【 leave them behind."\In the 1980s, five vo/cati\o\nal】 sch【ools【 】tr\ained 3【00 pupils a /year to wo】rk in fisheries. Today, only o\ne【 【sch】ool wit【h 40 students 【remains.Teache/rs say /that in the modern era, even high salar】ies and improved【 【/working conditions are n】ot enough to /ma【ke fishing attractive for【 yo【ung peopl】e.The scho【\o/l’s headmaster Jac【ki/e Scherrens said: "I\n th】e /p【ast, when they/ 】were, for example, two weeks at se】a, three days in the 】harbour, but from the th【ree da【/ys yo】u had 】to work】 two \days, and that was no problem. Now, when they a/【re, let&rsquo\;s say, /e/ight day】/s a】t sea, 【four days in /h】arbour, and/ you ha】ve to work one【 or two \days/ &m/d】【ash; they don\&\】rsquo;t wan【t that anymore! S/o it&rsquo\;s【 very difficult【 to attract you\n【g people for it."There /\are hopes th【at/\ si】x new vessels about to】 enter the Be/lgian fis】hing【 fleet will revive interest i\n the profession.1212121【】2121212121Shar\e this a【rticleCopy/pas\te the a/rticle video embed link below:CopyShareTw/eetS】【】】har】esendShareTweetShar】esendMoreHide【ShareSendShareShareShareSendSha】reSha\reYou/ might also l/ike 】 【 /\ The importance of re【sto】ring ma/rine【 b/iodiv】ersi】ty \ 【 M\o/re a【boutFishery/YouthOceanEnvironmental【 protection/ 】Most viewed /\ 【 \ / 【 What i【nfluence on climate is 】the coronavirus lockd\own rea\lly having? 】\/ 】 The new AI system safeguar\ding premature babies from infecti【on \ \ 】 / 】 Mes【sen\ger RNA: the molec\】ule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 【 / 【 【 Apple and Google say t/hey'/;l\l work together /to t】ra/ce spread of //【c\or\onavirus via s】martphones How EU fundin\g is/ cha/nging \the face of Latvian innovation 】 【 【Brows】e today's【 tagsjPGK

nzILSea/ life at 】risk if EU count】ries don't a【chieve/ marine protection 【goa\lsrjA8

agw7【Text si/zeAaAaOnce upon a time, there were th/ree bro\thers\...the story o/f the second/ best rest【au/rant i【n【 the w【orld, called El Cell\er de 【Can\ Roca, 【could 【start like a fable but thi\s story i\s actually real【. The Roc】a brothers' 【passion f【or co/ok\i\ng led them to open their 【restaurant in 1986\ and it has received thr【e【e Michelin-stars since then.Thei】r commitment is【 not limited to \cuisine, th【e restaur】ant operates【 a zero-w【ast】e【 p/olicy. Celle】r de C\an Roca&rsq【uo;s】 philo/so/phy consists in enhan/cing the loc】al【 products a】nd favouring sustainabi\lity.Ea/rl【ier /this year the restau/ran\t got int\o t\he spotlight bec】ause of finding 【a\ c/reative way t【/o make a good use\ of their 【plastic; they hav】e teamed up with Span/ish des】igner Andreu Carul\la, who \transformed t\】he p/la】stic waste of the/ restaurant into hex\ago】nal stools.And now the three brother】s 【have found 【another /way to \r【ecycle 【/some /of the res】t/aurant's【 waste, a project/ called Roca Rec【icla】.Click on the video\ 【above to learn more about /th/i】s restaurant's initiative t\o raise en【vironmental awareness.Share thi\s artic【le / \ Mo】re from wellnessIzmY

TtcRHow/ is the【 UAE ta】ckling its food waste problem?【wYQM

1.V2OeA/ "monster fatberg," consisting of eve\rythi\ng that shou】ldn't\ 【have /been flu【shed 】down a】】 toilet or poured d【\own a \si\nk, has【 been d【isc】overed/ in Devon, E\n\gland.South We/st /Water (SWW) says the berg【, which\ i/s belie/】ved to the larg\est e【ver found in\ Devon, is\ 64 m【etres in length.To pu【t this into perspective, 【it /is 7 metres lon/ger than the height 【of Italy's Leaning Tower /of P】】isa,【 1【2 】metres longer than the he】ight of/ Nelson【's\ Colum【n in London, 【and 1】7\ metres【 lo】nger t/ha】n the \hei\ght of P/aris【'【 //Arc de Triomphe.It is 【f\ormed of ma\/ny\ wa【\ste 】products, including】 wet wipes, co【ngea/led fat, oil and grease inside the sewer.An【d the/ 【remov】al process isn't expected to be s/imple."This is g/oing t\o t/ake us several weeks to remove," SWW's Director of Wastewater Andrew Roantree said/ 】in a vi】deo \stat【/em/ent \on Twitter."I】t will b/e a difficult/ exercise for our guys, and we ne/ed to】 \do/ it to protect【 the bath【ing wat【er [on the c】oast]."Work to remove the /fatber\g is due to begin on F/ebr/uary 4, /where sew】er 】w【orker\s 】will【 use hig/h-pressure j\et【s, shovels, pi】ckax\es and speci/alist equipment to tac】kle】 the m\onster b【it by bit.The】】se sewer blockag【es costs customers &p】o/und;4】.5 mi【llion a yea【r," South Wes\t Wat/【er w/arne\d."Every ti/me a wet wipe is/ flushed or oil p/oured 【down the】 drain, \there i\s a risk these it【ems【 could \c\ause sewer blockages. This i/s【 extremely unpleasant and could happen in your own home."London '/b\erg'\However, Devon's discovery \is still no 】m【atch for the enormous 250 metre【-lon【g fatberg found in London's sewe】r system i】n 2017.Small p【ar/ts of this chunk o/f waste were later exhibited at the Mu/seum of London,/ while the rest was rec/ycl\ed as bio【fuel to power Lond】on's bus network.REA】D MORE:【/ "BI【N it, don't 【BLOCK】 it!" -】 Monster 'fatber/g' is foun/d in London\ sewerREAD MORE: London】's 'fatberg' moves fro\m sewer/ /to museumShare th】is art\icleCopy/past\e the ar【t\icle video embed link below:CopyShareTweetShare】sendShareTweetShar\esend【MoreHideShareSendSh\areShareShare【SendShareShareYou might al【so like 】 】 】】 \ A circular economy is within \reach if Eu\rop】/ean busines/ses grasp the opportunity ǀ V\iew / \ \ 】 】 】 \ 【 Th】e Ugandan/ singer /tu【rning plastic waste int】o d【rums \ 】 \】 【 Our d\【isposable culture must 【end. We need t/he ‘right to repair’【 not/ recycle our s【martphones】 ǀ】】 Vi\ew More a\boutwastewast\e disposalEnvir/onm/entEnvironmental protection 【 】 Brow/se today&\#0【39\;s tagss4P5

2.U8rl【Szi】get m】us\ic fe【【st】ival in Hungary/ sh】owcases its gre】en /c/\redentialsHRKI

3.YgpG【/Spar】kle look\s to a gre///ener futu\r\e with the op\ening of its fourth data centre in Greece52Fz

4.MIrjT/ext siz【eAaAaTakin【g you on a jou【rne】y ac\ross t/he Yorksh/ire Dales an【d all【/ the way\ to Vanco【uver Is【land, Kate Fletcher&/【rsquo;s "Wild Dress" is an autob】iographica】l me】ander through the tende/r mom【ents wher/e clothing ha\s made her f/e【el 【embedde】d in nature. A Professor o【f su】stainability, design and【 fashi】on at the U\niversity of the Arts Lond/】o\/n; Fletch【er【 h\as】 been /a】t t】\he forefront of 【the\ c】/all for s\/ystematic change in /the fas【hion /industr【y.\ In her 【first col】lection of person【al writin】gs, \】Fletcher】 ha/s chosen t/o explore the complex and often art】ificially detached re】la/【t\ionship between the natur【al world a/nd/ what 【we\ wear.Fle/tcher looks at clothing as/ something m\ore e/ssential and far 【beyond its /si】mple【, modern, role as/ a dis】posabl【e commodity. It’s \no【t difficult to see that our c【ultural relationship with clothing has been【 】distorted by years of f/ast-movin【g/ \mo【de】rn /fashio】n t】rends but as she recou】nts the story of her【 【dad&rsquo/;s favourite jumper, there is a glimmer of some nostalgic, int】ergen/er【ational import\ance that breaks through/. Mending this dec【ade/】s-old piece of clothin/g using wool found 】in hedgerows and on fences she mus\es about this as a/ rebellious /act. “As I worked my lap felt w/arm,” she writes【, “Doing this felt like a way to live not】 j/u】st through the rules of 【modern society.&rdqu\o;Ch/arlie M\ee/chamIt’【s not just abo/ut rebell【ing \for the sake of reduci/ng w【ast/e, 】however. Fletcher rec】o【gnizes the】【 way t/hat modern out】do\or clothing i【mpos【es a kind of】 distance from the natural \world.【 The 】clothing we ch\/oose to wear becomes a divisio【n; 】farmworker vs lando【wner, recr\eatio/nal h/iker vs those \who work the land. A ne【ed for\ spe】/ci】fi【c, tec【h】no\log】ically advanced outdoor gear in b\right neon oil-based mat】erials 【is, Fletcher says, ju\st another in/dicat\ion of rampant cons\um\er \cult/ure.Th/e art installati【on teac】hing us to c【are for our/ forestsLivin/g Recomm【ends | A/ "vital tool】"\ for fighting the rising tide of si】ngle/ use plasticsL】\ivin【g Recommends 】| /No/ one is too s】mall to 【make a d【iffer】enceIt’s\ a v【ery d/\】i/fferent way to int【【roduce this/ message. Distan/t from the usual ev/ils of fast fa】sh/ion’s rapidly evolving aesthetics, she e】xp/lores the im\prac/tic/ali【ty of the always new in【 the/ face o/f the a\n】ci\ent /forces of the elements. Fletcher is【n’t preaching about all of the usual】 sust【ainab】le fa】/shion clichés but instead inviting you to think differently about how you\r/ garments can bring y】ou joy. T\he thrill o【f newness is fleeting 【but\ rich cultural relat\】】io】nships can and will【 last 【a lif//e\【time.Jack Gr\angeShunning the newness\ of n\/eoprene allows you to embrace /a\ more per/me\able【 exterior【. &/ldquo】;Once we\/&【rsquo;re there, we learn from the land and listen\ to the voic/es /of the b\irds and the \rain,” she writes, “We /give attentio】n to the unta【med parts of our【 world, in【】clud/ing that 【part in ourselves. [...] And this】 requires,】 at the least, that we make the \la】yers\ that【 \we build up 】ar【ound ourselves&【\mdash; some of wh】ich 】ar】e【 fashio【n in cloth—more permeable.&rdqu】o; Our clothing does\n&rsquo】;t alway】s have to /fo【rm】 a bar】】r【ier \between th】e inside and t】he outside, sometimes, whe】n your /&ldquo\;co】at&\rsquo;s wide sleeves grip\ onto\ t/h/\e lip o】f a gust&rdquo【】;】 o】r/ your &ldq】uo;trousers, wide-】legged act as a kite&rdq】u/o; it can \help you form \a connecti/on 】with na【tu/re.Kate Fletch/【er's Wi】ld Dress: Clothing a\nd the】 natural world is av\ailable from Uniformbooks, more \informatio】n can be fou\nd here.Share this articl/e M/ore 【from\ lifeGhVB

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lt8y/Join us in t\his i\mmersive 36/0° experience onboard "/B】roodw/inner" - a /29 metre bea/m trawler built// in【 1967 a/nd used to train/ you】ng fisherme【n in Belgium.The vessel, renova【\ted a 【f【ew years ago with the supp】ort of the Euro】pea/n 】Maritime and 【Fis/heries F/und, has everything necessary to p】/rovide fut/ure maritime professiona【l】s\ with ha/】nds-on ex】perience./B】art De Waegenare, a te【acher a\t the Maritie【m Instituut Merca/tor in 【Ostend, \superv\is\es a】 group of l】o\】cal students on/ their training trip."T/he】【y】 come f/rom everywh】】ere in Belgium. /They start at 12-13 years of age, and they sta/y u/ntil 18."The f\irst and the second year clas【ses 【go to】 sea /ev】ery】 \n\ow 【and【 then, but the th】ird and /fourth】 year students go out e/very two week】\/s with t】he vessel — eve【r【y tw【o wee/ks for 【a whole s\chool year."That’s normal\ working hours, between 080/0 and 1600 &m\dash; so/ fo\r 】eight hours a day/, t\hey are at /sea."We /try to t/each them /to be a fis/herma】n — fr】om t\he begi\nning. What is a fis【hing boat, what d】o you/ have to do,/ it’s normal working cond【iti【ons f【/【or a beam trawler【."We teach them t\o work safe\ly】 【— safet\y he】lmet, saf【ety】 device for 】when/ 【they fal】l overboard — that&rsquo】;s never happened, but【 you never know【. So that&r/squo;s also an importan\t part. Working w【ith fish /— 【they have to clean the 【\fish, things 】lik【e that. And /naviga】ting th/e/ vessel also."They really see what it is\, getting their first impression \her\e.\ A/nd then when they get older, they g】et technical cl】a/sses, and t】he older g】u】【\】/ys /\h\ere go to sea on professional fishing vessel\s. There they see real life at a workplace. A】nd that,\ in \my opi\nion\, i\s when they /make/ a choice to do \it — o】r not to d\o it."Journalist name • Denis】 LoctierSh\are this articl【eShareTweetSharesend】/ShareTweetShar【esendMoreHide/ShareSendShareShareSha【reSendSh/areShare\More \aboutOceanFisheryEnvironmental protectionYouth360° vid\eo 】 【 【】 Most viewed / \ /What influence on clim/a【te/ is th\e coronavirus lockdown really having? / 【 / T\【he new AI system 【safeguarding pre/mature babies from infec\tion / \ \ 】 【 / 】 Messenger R\NA:【 \the molecule\ that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 】 / Apple and Google\ say they'll wo/rk toget【her t】o trace spread of coronavirus via smartphon】es \ 【 【 】 \ How EU funding is \chan\ging th【e fac【e of L\a/】tvian\ innovat】ion 【 / \ 【 Browse today's t/【ag/skGyK

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iIIm\Wildlife photography:“I】\t's not just about beautiful pictures”qENU

Ze潍坊环保je

BlHnText sizeAaAaLondon-based desi【gn fi\rm Pries】tmanGoode has launc】hed a s\ustainably/ made in-flight meal tray meant for pass\engers, a】】s pa【r/t【 o】f its ‘Get Onboard: Reduce. Reuse. Rethink&rs\quo/; proj【ect. The eco-friendly proof is in the puddin】g - as】 the【 final prototype is\ 】edible too.The new mea】l tray is made fr】om completely fo/od-safe, bio【degradeable constituen\ts. The tray itsel\f is】 made from coffee grounds and e】v】erythi】ng,\ down to the salad box l】id, is made from alternative materials】 like banana leaf and algae. The desig【n //studio had various \aims wh\en/ c】】reating】】 the concept, /inclu\ding /a reduction of single-】u/se pla\stics 【ge/nerated from a normal on【-board【 /【meal service, which the\y have managed to ac【hieve.【Other impressive\ fe\a\ture【s include an edi】ble desse】rt lid made from wafer, a reus】able s【pork made/ from coconu】\t wood, c\apsules used for sauces 】or milk/ ma/de from\ soluble seaweed and a【 h【ot mai\n \/me/al li//d made fr【】o【m \bamboo.Edib\le airline meal trayPriestmanGoode\“While there is currently no pe【【rfect solution\, \this】 \des【ign proposa】l aims to encourage su\pp】/l/iers and ai\rlines to rethin/k the m\eal servi【ce in a more eco-friendly manner, 】particu/l】arly ahead of legislation t/o ban single-use plastic,】 which in】/ som\e/ 】count\【\ries is pr】o【po/sed for as early as /2021,” say】s Jo Rowan, Associate/ //Strategy Director at Pri【estmanGood】e,/ in a press \rel】ease.Th【e design team has also inven【te/d 【a new travel【\ water bottle,/ feat【ured bel/o】w, made\ /from compostable bio-plastic and cor】k. I\t/ is desi【gned /to be used ove【r a short/-term period such as /a\ holiday and\ refilled regularly. While on-board, a water co】oler \cart would ideally be availab\le o/n the a】ircraft/, allowing /passeng】ers to refill dur【ing/ the flight to【 mini【mise buying plastic bottl/es. View thi\s post on Instagram】How can we reduce plastic bot/tl/e waste w/he/n we t】/\ravel? In our exhibition 'Get Onboard: Re/duce. Reuse. Reth】ink' @designmuseum now open, we pr【opose a w/ater b】ottle】 made from】 】biodegradable and commercial\ly c/ompostable \bioplastic and cork. \The b【ot】\tle is designed for repe\ate/d, \but shor\】【t term u\s【e, like the le/ng/th of your/ holiday, and is\ desi\g】ned \to address the im】pulse\ buy at ai/rports and statio【ns . Did you know that if passengers @heathrow_air/por\t depart/ures loung【es r【efilled from water fountains rather\ than bought plasti/】c bottles, the airport would be a【ble/】 to r】educe it【s plas/tic bott\【le /c】onsumption b/y /35/ million a year. Fa\ct vi//a \@refillhq ./ . . . . #pri\e【stmangoode #getonboard \#su\stainabl】e/design #sustai】nable #sustainability #sustainable\t】/ravel\ #zerowast/e #ecomater\ials #et/hical #cmf #ma\terials #biodegradab\le #compost/【able #\ldf19 #travelne\ws【 #avi】ati/on #in\du/strialdesig/n #pro【ductdesign\ #innovation #【de/【sign #desig】nnew【s #\desig【nthinking #design【studio \#l/o】ndonde】/sign #ecodesign #de】signinspiration #d/esignlife #tr\ansport #biodesign #tran/sportdesign . @design @dezeen @wallpa【perm】ag @designboom @designmilk @l_d_f_offic\ial @thedesi\gnair【 @design_b】urger @designers_need @pr/o\】deez @】lemanoosh_official @id_curate\d /@thepoint【sguy @the】pointsguyuk @design\bunker \@yankodesign @letsdes\【igndai】ly【 @_desig】n【_inspirationA post /share【d by PriestmanGoode (@priestmangood\e) on Se\p 12, 2019 at 11:31p/m PDTGet Onboar\d: Reduce\.Reus】e.Rethink at London's D\】esign MuseumPr/iestm\anGoode】】 s【pecialises【 in 【ind【ustrial d\esi【gn for 【the transp\ort and aviation sectors, with a particular focus on environment\a】l inno/vation【/. Its newes/t exhibitio【n at the Desig\n Museum in London explores \the iss/】ue of【 \waste in travel and \looks 】at how de】velop\ments in eco \mat\e/ri\als can \make the industry more sustainable【./ Materials inclu【de Econyl, a\ regenerated nyl\on yarn made from salvage【d fishi/ng nets, seaweed ya\【rn and 】so\me\ you 【may not have he】ard of like pineapple wood and【 Tasma】n recycle/d glass.【\According to st】a【tisti\cs】 】on their web/site, an esti\mated 5.7 milli【\on \to】nnes of cabin waste is gen】erated \on/ pass【enger fli\ghts every year, from 】sing/le】-use 【plast【ic in am\enities kit】s, to mea】l trays and earphone/s. The exhibition showcases how suppl\iers/, green in】itiatives and attempted cha【nges 【i\n custo\mer beh【avio【ur /can transform o/u】r experience across all transport modes. View this po/st on Instagra【mIf y/o【u're i【n London, 【make \/sure to visit our ex/hibition 'Get Onboar】d: Reduce. Reuse.【 Reth【ink' n\ow showing @desig\nmuseum 【. T【he ex【hibition addresses t】he issu】e of 】waste in travel, and 【explores how design thinking \【and material in【novation can】 help /us\ rethink the produc/ts 【and\ services tha【t /make up our journeys . ./ . . . #priestmangoode #getonboar/d #sustai】nabledesig\n #su】/stainable #s/ustainabil\ity 【#su\stainabletravel #zerowaste #ecomateria【ls【 #ethic/al #cmf #materials #biodegrada\ble #com【postable #ld【f19 #t【/ravelnews 【#aviation #industrialdesign #【productd/esign #innovati\on #design #designnew】s #designthin【k/in【g #d/esignst【udio #/londondesign #ecodesign #design】inspiration #designlife #tra】nsport #biodesign #transportdesign . \@d/ezeen @wallpaperma【】g @designboom @telegra】phtr【\av】el【 @sundaytimest】rave】l @tabilabo @n//atgeotraveluk @lonelyplanetmag @condenast/traveller @travelandleisure\ @timeoutl/】ond\on】】 @londonist_co\】m @wiredA post\ shared by PriestmanGoode (@\priestman/】goode【) on Sep 29\, 2019 at 9:0】9am PDTJo\ Ro】wan /concludes/, P/riestmanGoode want to &ldq】uo;raise awaren】ess of /how much was【te is c/reated when we tr/avel, and expl】ore al】ternat】ives that/ addres\】s t/he supply of】 products a】nd 】services/, but【 also what e/ach in】dividual can do to lead us to a m\ore sustainable travel industry.” 【 Get O/【n/board: Reduce.Reu\se.Rethink】 is on at 】\the\ Design Mu\seum in /London 】from 12th Se】】ptember】 2019/ \until【 9th February 2020.\Sha【re this ar/ticl】e 【 】】 Mor【e 】from】 【lifef2E8

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qOQ4Nur/s/e/ry school children in the U】nited Ara【/b \Emirates are】 learning e【arly】 about 【the 【importanc\e of recycling leftove】r food\.Li】tt【le 】ones at the Kids Worl\【d \Nursery in 】Dubai】 are ge】tti【ng their h\ands di/rty【 an/d fee/ling the【 diff【erence 】bet】ween green waste, like apples and 【onions, and brown waste which inclu【des leaves and twi【gs.UAE children learn about com【postingAfter 45 days, using worms to create comp\ost fro【m food wa/s】te, the children】 use the enri\che【d mat】er\i】al t】o n】ourish pl/ants in \the nursery’s garden. Once fertilized, the cycl\e starts again.Thr【ee-and-a-half-y/ear\-old \Ja【x V】/an Dyk used the compost 【he an【d his /\class】m【ates m/a】de to feed h/is chili pepper pla/nt. Duri】ng the process, he le【arned an import】ant lesson.“Comp/\ost makes soil and soil make【s p】lants g\row,&\rdquo; he proudly states.Through hands-on learning, 【/nursery】 】children can establish sustainabl\e, lifelong habits, says the nursery’s fou\nder, Lovita/ Ta\riq.An【 impor【tant /question fo/r the kids is【, ‘Why do we recycle?’&\ldquo;We tell th\em wh】at wil/l happen if we don&rs【quo;t d\o these thin\g【s, whilst showi\ng the】m small videos on what’s goi】ng t】o happen i【f the/ world becomes hotter - ho\w t\h/e a】nimals are goi【ng 【to have probl】ems,” she explains.UAE children learn about compostingTHE \AI ANSWER/ 【TO 【F\OOD WASTEFood【 waste costs t】he UAE a【n estimated 3.5 billio】n dollars (3.1\ billion Euros) per year a/cc【or/ding to the Ministry /of /Climate Change and Environment.By 2030\, the coun/\try is pledging to slash food wa】ste in half. A【 national】 】milestone\ ca/me in 28【, when the UAE was able to conserve/ the equiv】alent】 of more than one 】million meals.Pa\rt of it/】s /action plan to tackle the food waste issue 】is【】 t【o look to technology companies for innovative answ】er\s.For\ /example, in //【a bid t【o help global F\&【B bu】sine/sses, London-based】】 start-up Winnow Solutions】 /【is\【 /using a/rtific【ia\l int【elligence to scan and identify /excess wast/e with 】cameras.A/n A】I solution to food wast【e, scans and identifies /e】x【ces/【s waste wi/th camerasThis can, they say, /preven/t/ up to 70 perce/nt of foo】d waste in the firs【t】 year 】of【 】use.Key con【tributors to the Middle】 East【【 regio\n【&rsq【uo;s food \waste prob/l】em are large】 /buffet-style dining】 operations and a culture of gener\ous hospitality,【 say/s Ignacio /Ram】irez, the company’s MENA\/ director.【&ldquo/;In this】 region, cult\urally speaking, 】people \wan【/t th\eir guest to always\ h】ave /eno】ugh【, but it do】esn’t m\ean the\y want to produc\e too much,” h【e expla】ins, adding t【ha\t most food】 wast/ed\】 gl/obally is throw/n \out before 【it reaches people&【rsquo;s p\lates/.Ignaci】o Ramir/ez speaks t/\o Euronews’ \Sali/m/ EssaidWA【】S】TE, LANDFILLS & GLOBA\L \WARMINGMo\re \than one-third of the 【world’s food,/ a/mounting to ar【ound a bill【ion tons, ha】s been wasted yearl】y since 2011, accor【ding to t/he U\nited N/at\ions.In 【landfills/, w【a/ste\d food pro/du/ces nearly 10 p/ercent【】 of the world&rs【quo;s greenhous\e gasses, /affecting glo\bal warming.Exce/ss fo/od waste prod【uc\es【 10 \percent of【 the w\or/ld&】r【squo;s greenhouse gasses\The World Wildlife Fu/nd attributes food w】aste as the】 main 【【cause of deforestation an【d【 the l\oss of w【ater s/】ources worldwide due】 t/o rising food dema\nd/ a】nd consumption, 【and also the conve/rs【ion of forests t\o farmland and ranch land.Gulf Arab co【/untries ha\ve some o】【f the l【argest amounts o【f food wa【/ste, 】ac\co/rd\in】g to the e】/nvironmental service /p\rovider Dubai Carbon.Th\e UAE is \among the top waste generators in th】e w\orld, disposing of an e【stimated 2.7】 kilog】rams of food per person dai\l【y, whi【ch 】is more than d】ouble the rate of Europe, re\ports the agency\.SEEN】 ON 【S】OCIAL MED】IA: 】SUSTA/I\NABLE GROWTHTh/e R\【EEM Pro\gram in Bahr】ain wishes】】 to inspire &l\dquo;little environm】ental【 leaders,” sharing this post of a tree pla【nting /w/ork\shop for ch/i【】ldren. View this post on Instag\r/am#&/#【1576;ر&【#1606;】75;مج_ي&\#15;_/604;&】#/1602;&/#1575;ž/3;ة_】/البيئ&【#77;_】75; 【4;】589;غا】;ر ¡】0;\شاUك في ف/593;&/#1575;&\#1604【;ية【 【#Lيد】10;_【;زUع】; في #ج 】6;】75;【10;】06;_اهم&\#160】4\;\】77; تن&【】#1592;يم【 #جمعي】ة_أصد&#/1602;اء_&/#1575;&/#1】604】;ب【10;/74;ة ب&【#15;ع【575;¡An international ag\reeme\nt signed in 2018 pre【ventively banned all【】 commercial fishing】 in \the【【 】Central Arct【ic Ocean —【 long befor【e any 】fishi【ng could /\real】istically begin. Why was that ban necessary, and how can marine biologists 【ta/ke advantage of】 planned po【lar/ expedition\s to/ f/ind out more about future fishing prospects in the Arct【/ic \high seas?Dr. Pauline Snoeijs 【Leijonmalm, Professor of Marine Ecol【o】gy a【t S】tockholm University, talked to E/uronews hours before lea【ving Troms&os】lash【;, Norway onbo\ard the Po\larstern\ icebreaker f【or the MOSAiC \expedition at the Nort\h Pole.She bega/n by explaining【 \w/hy we n】eed a fishing ba\n in the region:“We don/’t kn【ow a】nything abou【】/t 【the ecosystem,【 and\ we don’t kno【w anyt】h【ing about which fish we\ have! It’s a very /nutr【i/e】nt-poor ecosystem,\ so I expect ver/y little fish. And then if you st【art fishing, th【en you can destroy the ecosy/stem, or th/e balance of the organisms."MOSAiC Exped/ition'/s research camera【Once th】e/ ic】e disappe】ars, there \could be a ru\sh to fish\ t\he are【a\, which lies outside the exclusive eco】nomic zon\e of th【e\ coastal countries“\So that’s 】why we ne【】ed to kno\w】 now what /we have in this sea that perhaps can be/ exp/loited by anyone," P】rofessor Leijonmalm explains.【 "And 】】of course, we need prot【ectio】n for this are【】a. So what we’re going to do i【【】s to build\ a way to protect thi\s ar【ea 【by c/】ol/lect【ing b【ase】line【 data.&l/d【q/uo;We】 are at the very/ beginning of this/.\ What we are doi\ng is now mappi/ng, and this is t\he first expedi\t】ion tha】t&rs\quo;s going to map. And \the big advantage of conn【ecting\ to such【 a big exp/edition is t】hat we get all the environmental data【】 from the ship’s 】program &】mdash;】 s/o we【 do no】t need to】 /\measure the】 chlorophyll /our【se】lves, or the 】【nutrients, or not【 even th\e zooplan【】】kt】on. We \need o】nly to look【 a】t the fish】, and the other data【 we can use, and connect then】 the fi】sh data t\o. /So that’s/ a very big adv【\a【n\tage of these【【 big expeditions./&rdqu【o;/Pol】arstern ic/ebreaker sets sail】 for the North PoleShare thi\】s art/】\icl/eCopy/pas【te th【e /article video embed \link \below:Cop\yShareTweetShar【esen【dShare\T\w【eetShare【sendMoreHideS】hareSendShareShare/Sha】reSendSha\reShareMore aboutGlobal warming and climate changeFisheryArcticEnviro【nmenta/l protectionGreenland / Mo】s】t v\iewed 【 Wh【at i\nfluence on climate】\ is the cor/o/navirus lockdown really having? \ 【 】 】 】 \ 】 / The new AI system s\【【af【eg【uarding prematu】re【 /babies from infectio】n 】 \ 【 Messe\nger RN】A: the molecule that ma/y teach our bodies to \beat cancer 【 /\ 】 \ App/le\ and G】o\【ogle 】say they'll wo/rk \togethe【r to 】trace sprea\d of cor【onavirus via smartphon】es 【 】 \ \ How EU funding /is ch/ang】ing the face 【o/f Latvia\n innovation 】 】 】 【 \ Bro\wse today/'s【 ta\gs\;/77;】】 ا&#【/】16;ا&#/1587;&\#15;ذ/7】; &\#1586;【/610;ن】577; ج\【5;&#/1587;م #&#/1575;ل&】#1593; &#/1608;_ا 】4;&】#1576/;/04;&【#1583; #&#【15【87;اLعة_ا 【4;ش\اي】ة @za】ina_jassim86 و بد/93;\【05;\ م&\#1606; #&【#15【88;】585;كة #\م&【【#1588;اي】593;_ا&#/16】04;م\/605;لك【7】7; با&#/16/04;ت&【#1593;ا&#【【1608; 【/6; م【;ع #أم&#】1606;ا【5;_ا\;لب】;ي/574;】 في #/75;لشما&】#1604;ي\;【77; و #بلدي&/#1577;_【\الش/05;ا/ل&#/1610;ة &/#1588;ك/;【585;/575; ل&】#1605;زارعين الذ¡【0; /Ÿل&#【【0; ا ال/;&#【】571;&#【1591;/ف】575;ل #【575;【604;】زاŸة \&#】160】8;ž【7;ا【&【#1593;د】&\#1607;/&#】1605; في رž【7/; #ش&#【158/0;ž【77;_نوف&\#1605;//76;ر &#【16/08; #نبت/】77;_ 】6;&#】1608\;&/#1】601;مبر من #م/ش【8;】0】4;_غص【;ن/;_ا /4;】6;【81;ي&/#1606; في #كر【انة #ك【585;&/#1575;ن/;ة_ا//60;بحري\ن @bb】n】.b】h &】#1578/;ح&/#1610;ة للم【606;ظم【/;&/#1610;ن ا&\#1604】;】را【/;【74;عين \م】;ن/; #žTradition and innov】ation in car b【odywork\;معية/;_/9;دق/;اء_】ا&【#1604;&/#1576;&【】#16】10;ئ/;【77】; #&\#1605;&/#1593;لم&#/1578;نا 】و &\#1605\;دي\رة #【&#【1585;نم&\#1】580;_ري【م #خولة_ا//【604;م】607;نSي &/\#05;س&#】1572;】608;ل /5\;لنظ/610;م 【و&】#1575/; &#/1571【;ن【588;طة &【#1575;لش\;ب】】;Kب\¡/0;【57】7; ال】;【593;Ÿ【0;&【#1608;ة الن】;ط】】77; 【571;. /زي/;ن قاه&】#1585;【610; #【75;ل】57/8;ع&#/04;ي&/#1605;_ا/&#】1604;&#】1576;&【#1610;ي #الت&【#1/593;ل&】#1】610;م_ا\;لب\】610;ئي_ال】قيم/10;【 #】1;م【;ا&【#161/0;&】\#1577;_ا【;لبي】/4; #ا&【#160/4;بيئ&#/1577; #الأ\【;ف&/#1575;ل #\&】#1575;لبي/4;ي\/;ي #/60】2;ا\د】【77; #البي&/#1574【;&/#17; #】75;&【#1604;صغار\; #ب¡The big, bea/【utiful Baltic Sea 【/hides /a dirty secret in its 377,00】0km of water.A\ 【number of agricultural/ spills has turned t】he Baltic【 into one of /t/he most /pol】lu\ted】 seas in】 the wor】ld, due to excess nitrogen \and phos\phorus lacing it】s wat【ers.This process of eutrophication ha\s【 led to \the de\pl/etion \/of oxyg】en and /an【 overg\】rowt【h of algae in the body o【f wa】ter, 【but not 【al\l h】ope/ is 【】lo】st.\Eutrophication ex/p】lai【nedAn unlik】ely assist/an】tMussel farms lik\e【 Kieler Meeresfarm【 in the Germ【an port city of Kie】l are ho/p】ing 【to ma【ke a dif】f【eren】ce in th/e 【Baltic'】s/ increasin\g【ly di【fficult fight\ against algae.Hundreds o【f tho】usands of th\ese mighty mol/lus\cs wo/rk to filter the water eve/ry day by\ eating their way through microsc】opic a\lg】ae.Kieler Meeresfarm 】is just one f】arm taking pa\rt in Balt/ic Blue Growth, an experimental【 Europe/an pro】ject coordinated based in\ Sweden's Ostergötland region.Th【e】 p/roj【ect is worth 4.6 million Euros, with/ 3.6 million 】Euros coming from regional aid under the EU Coh/esion Policy. 18【 partners in six B【altic co【untrie】s are taking p/art.All six participating farms/ are locate】d in importa【nt】 strategic locations across th\/e Baltic region/.The farms are all in close co】n\t【act with \each】 other, sharing techn/iques and /ideas despite having diffe/rent\ experiences.Kieler】 Me】eresfarm f】ounder Tim Sr【a\ufenberge/r \says '】'I'm having【 here diffe【rent【 conditions th【\an in Sweden. So w/ha【t 】works for me doesn't really wo】rk in】 Swed\en and/ vi/ce versa b\ut we 【can talk\ to each other and have that \shari【ng of i/deas.''T【he wate】\r quality and transparency is mea】sured twice a year and researc\h】ers sa】y that the results ar【e conclusive.1212121212121212More than/】 just mu【ssels\NGO Coas\【tal Union Germany, EUCC, is 】als】o helping to raise soci】al awa/ren/ess on imp/ro\ving water qual】ity.EUCC has cre【at【e】d a number of databases and learning tools for intern【a】tional networ】ks, providing\ relevant i】】nform【/at【ion, wo】rkshops /and 】conferenc\es about/ the im/porta/nce /of usin】g】 musse/【ls to impro】v/e wa】te/r qualit/【y i/n \the Baltic Sea.Looking to the futureThe project's ultima】te aim is \to bring r【eal change to the【 Baltic Sea region.This i】\s 【expected to be done in revolutionis/ing\ the us】e o/f /musse/】l meal for ani【mal feed. The【 project is expe【】cted to also at\tract int/erest from broader \markets,/ at/tracting /entrepreneur/s /and in\vestment in mussel m\eal as a viable alternative to curre【nt\ animal feed.Watch s】ome of【 ou【r social media coverageShare this】 ar】t【icleC\opy/】paste the ar\//ticle video em【be\】d link below:Cop】y【\ShareTweetSharesendShareTweetSharese\ndMoreHideShareSendSh】areShareShareS【end/ShareShareYo】u mi/ght also like/ / \ / 【 Devise【 P【roject: Ireland puts the spotli\ght on digital/ SMEs / \ / 【 More aboutContamination of waterEn【vironmental 】protecti】/\onF/aun】a and F【loraGermany Browse today'\;s tags;&\#13/;ي_【571】;ز\;】585;ع @environmentfriendssociety @efs_bahrain @reem.\efs 】خل【75;ل &#】1605;ر】03;/ اط】601;ا】;【 قادة 【】6;ž】5; 】6;ا【05;&#【1【580; ر】610;م &#/01;ي فعا&#/1【6】04;ية &#/1576;【10;دي ازرع 【ا】04;تي 】8;قا&【#160; كل شهر #ا\;لت/;ع【604;/10;【0】5;_&#】15【75;لب/;يئ #【التع&【#16/04【;&】#1610;م_الب/10;&#】15/74;ي/【;_&\#1575;&/#1604;قيم【/;&#/1610; #&】#\】1581;ما&#【1【6/10】;】/7;_البي【4;】ة #ا/604;ب/يئ&/#1577; #الأط ا&#/04/; #&#】1575;【604;بيئيين #】602;ا\; ة #البي\Jة【; #ا【ل/】صغار #ب¡/0;دي_&#/1571;ز&#】1585;ع @】env【iro/n/men】tfriendssocie\ty @efs_b\ahra\in\ /@】reem.efsA po\st shared by &【#1576;ر\;ناج ر【610; 【5; - REEM Pro】gram (@reem.\efs) on/ Nov 30, 2019 at 5】:34am PSTShare /this artic\leCopy/paste【 the artic】\le video embed link/ below:CopyShareTweetSharese】ndSha】reTweetSharesen/dMoreHideShareSendShareShareS\h\areSen】【\】dShareS】h/areYou might a】l】so like 】 \ 【 ‘Kokoro’ is celebrity 】chef 【Nobu/ Matsuhis\a’s se/【/cret ingredient \ / \ / 【 / Can UAE oyster f】a【rmers rival their global compet\itors? 【 \ \ / 】 【/ \ \ Globa/l energy deman】d debated at/ Abu Dhab/i Sus】tainability We/ek 【 / 】 / More aboutRecyclingFoodEnvironmental 】protec/tionUnited Arab Em/ir/ates Browse 【today'\s tag\sh6Tg

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vfS8\Te】xt sizeAaAa/A s\how【case of t】ho/usands of completel\y sustainable f\abrics is co】ming to London, or】ganiser The Sustainable【 Angle has announced.【The not-for-profit o/r/g/anisation has been a rele】ntl】\ess/ 【s【upporter of innovative/ lower\ carbon solutions to fashio/n&rsquo【;s biggest problems【 since 2010 and hopes that this/ \ev/ent 】will encourag/e ev/en/ more /designe】】rs and creators【 to adopt 】respo/n【sible solutions.】This will \be the ninth e/dit】ion of the Fut】ure Fabrics Expo which is the l\argest sho【wcase of sustainable fabrics of its k】ind. /With each f\abr【ic, informa/tion about where it has com/e from and 】/the/ environm\e/nta【l footpri/nt\ of【 its】 manufacture w\il/l be/【 provided. I【ncreas【ing tr\an/sparency in【 how our clothing i/s made is on】e\ way to he/lp bot【h designers and co【nsumers to 【make responsi\ble choice【s.Materials /o\n show will】 include 】the i/ncreas\i【ngly popular TENCEL Lyoce\ll and Modal as well as【 several fa/brics th】at take an innovative approach to post-cons【】umer recycling. Wi\th fashion waste /firm【ly in】 【the spotl【igh【t this season, there is a real dri【ve from /\consum】ers towa/rd more circular soluti【ons\】.These m\ode【rn approa\】ches will be e/xhibited alongside co/mpanies that ch】ampion t/rad\it\ional sustainable ma】te/rials/ like line/n and bast. Although less common i/n modern designs, these ancient f【】ab/rics are biodeg】radable and water-efficient. 【The plant fi【b【res fr】om 【】【whi】ch\ they are grown can ev\/en sequester C【O/ from the atmosphere.Founders of the expo, 】The【 Su】stainable Angle, hope t】o change the fash/ion i】ndustry \for the bet/ter s【o that, instea/d of stri】ppin/g resources an/】d p/oll\uting environments, \it can【 have a 】po/sit/i/ve impa【ct on n\ature an\/d the communities that 】\make o】ur cloth/es.Read/ More | W\【hat is Tencel? \T//h【e s\ustainable fabric e/v【eryone is 】talking /aboutClaire\ Bergk/am\p, Global Director of S【us【ta】inability and Innovation, Stella McCartney (left) in/ 【convers\ation/ with Orsol/a de Castro, Co-foun】der of Fashion Revolution】 (right)【\.Suzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustaina】\ble AngleAs well as showing off materials th\at designers can u】se t】o /decrease the e】nviro】nmental impact of t\heir own 【de】signs, the F/uture】 F【abrics\ Expo will also h【o\st panels to h\elp】/ ed/ucate atte\n】de/es and fac\ilitate discussion between industry exp【e【rts. Panels for\ the ninth Future F【abrics Expo will b/e】 focus\ed around r【egenera】t\i】ve, circul/ar ap】proaches to sust\ainable des【ign and how fashion can be a “powerful force /for positive change”.Future\【/ Fashion ExpoS\uzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustainable AngleAt 】a /p】an/el at last 【year’s event, Claire Bergkamp, Glob/al Director of Susta】】】inability and \Innovatio】n at Stella\ McCart/ney emphasised t\he value【 of eve\nts like t\his i】n helping to eradicate unsustainable mat】er\ial\s from t【he【 fashion in【du\/stry; “We have to \repl/ace them with i/nnova】t\ive, sustainable alternatives. The o/】ther half of inno】vati】on in the【】 future of fabrics has to be about rethinkin】g t【he syst】em【s 【tha】t we /have now…/【How can we find lower-im【pact ways o\f【】 】creating things?”.Part of the /Expo last year al】】so in【cluded two curated areas dedic\ated to fashion bra\nds fully embraci\ng responsib/le s】our\cing and circularity in thei【/r 【collections. New collaborati/on/s【 between leading designers and companies c/reating inno】vative new material\ technologies are the ideal outcome from this event.Suzanne Plunkett /The 】Sustainable A】ngle【The \【event will take place from the 29th-3】0th Januar/y 2020 at\ Victoria House, Bloomsbur\y Square, 】L】ondon. Tick/et registratio/n f/or de【【signers/ and brands /can be/ found h\er【e.Share this article \ 】More /from l\ifepZUh

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Kpe9Text si】zeAaAaThere’s no \doubt about it: /art, in its many forms, is so \much mor/e than a \kind /of s】elf-【express】ion. It 】can often be【 a force for good and much-ne/eded \chan【ge. From photography t】o lively discussion and jaw-dropping footage,/ t\hese are【 the exhibitions and documentar/ies on 【climate change around the \world/ to have on your r\a/d【ar f【or May】 2019.A】r\t + Climate/ = Change FestivalWhere】: Various, Melbourne, Australia\When: Until 19 May 2019This exciting initi\ative is a month-long festi】val 】l/ooking at the way】s 】in w】hich a】rt can make\ a diffe/rence in the】 discussion around sustainabi/li】ty and climate change. This i】s/ a s【eries of curated \exhibitions, artist t【alks and lectures w【ith some o【f【 the most p\romi】nent environment and climate ch】a\nge 】scientists, psycho\lo\gists and res【earchers】 /t\hat aims to open \】【up di/s\cussi】on】 on the wa】ys in\ whi\ch art ca】n work a/【\s an a】cti】vism【 to\o【l. This will be running in Victoria,\ Australia, but /man】y of the talks will be\ filmed, mea【ning you don’t】 have to be in the country to get involve/d wi/th this excit/ing moveme\nt.More infoClimate Change: The\ F\/acts with David AttenboroughNet】work: BBC iPla【yerWhen: Ava【ila\ble /from Ap】【ril 2019If you’ve yet to w/atch \t\his grou】ndbr【eaking BB【C /docu\ment【ar】y, now&rsquo\;s the ti\me. Presented b】y\ t】he world&rsq\uo;s】 most/】【 】resp】ected wi\ldlife doc】ume\ntary m【aker, Dav】id Attenborough cuts through the fake news】 and confu/si】ng statist\ics\ to/ bring 【us the tru】th about what is \act\ually happening to】 \our environment/\. In th】is 】hour-long progr\/amme, issues s】uch as/ sp/ecies extinction【s, deforestation and extreme wea\ther a【re all tackled. Though it i【s som【ewh\at 】harrowing - and worryin】g - to w/atch, there is an /o/verall message of h/op】e:】 that we ha【ve the pow\er/ \to t【urn the tid\【e o/【f 】cli】mate chan/ge /once】 an【d for all.More infoAltered OceanWhere【: The Royal Phot/ographic【 Society, Bristol, U】KWhen: U/ntil\ 23 】June 2019According to statist【ic【s, approxim\ately 8 million\/】 pieces of 【plastic find 【】their way into \the ocean every day. Da/vi/d Attenboroug/h brought th/e i\ssue of p\lasti【c pollu\tion to the forefront b】ack in 2017 with h/is BBC documen】t\ary, Blue】 Plane【t II 【and it has now become one the major climate change /discussi】ons】 between cou\ntries and local communiti/es. 【I/】】n 【this 【pho【to series, Mandy Barke【r has doc【】】ume】nted\ her findings as】 a ph【otog】rapher travelling the world. Comb】ined wit【h resea【【r\ch n【o/tes, /sk/etchbooks and scient/ific s\amples, it combines both art andscience to p【resent a we\l/l-rou【nded exhibition that forces th\e viewer 】to confront t【he realities our oceans are fa\c\i/ng.More infoHuman/ Natu/re】W【here: Muse【um of World Cultu】re, Gothenburg, SwedenWhen: Until M\ay 2020Bringing toge\/ther 【a collection /o/f】 poignan】t photographs】, w/orks o【f 【art an】d other a】\rchived materials, the Museum of Worl/d Cul【ture has curated an exhib【\iti【on that explores the way h/uman lives ar【e di/\rectly affecting th】e planet. Looking \at/ everything from the【 things we \choose to repair and care fo\r versus those we sim/pl\/y consume, as well as sci\entific results in/ envi】ronme\ntal p【sy】chology, it&rsq】uo;s a /fascinat\ing s\tu【dy of th】e relationship between people and the \planet we call ho/me. T【hough it doe【s feed t【h\e visitor some uncomfortable truths,【 the overall m【/essage is one of //hope】, she\dding light on m/a【ny of the positive initiati/\ves tackling to redu/ce o\u\r impact and offering p/racti/cal tips that c【a【n be taken away and in\corpora【ted into 【daily life.Mor】e i【nfoCarmig【nac P\hoto】j//ou】rna】lism Award: Arctic/: New FrontierWh】ere: Sa/atch/i Gal】lery, Lond【on, UKWhen: Until 6 】M\a【y 2019Photographers Yuri Kozyrev an/d Kadir van Lohuize】n have won the S\aatchi 】Ga【ll/e\ry&rs】quo;s ninth Carmignac Photojournalism Award for the\ir project on the Arctic. Widel】y view】ed as 】one of the most enda\ng【ere】d 【ar】】eas in the world, the Arctic【 】is home to 】the Nenets - a nomadi【c】 group that make the yearly m/igration a\cross Nort【h【ern】 Russia. F【o/r \the first t【ime e】v\er, \their journey was i/nterrupted by melt/ing frost in 2018. K】ozyrev f】ollowed【【 their progress this year and bore witness 【to the impact【 t/hat global/ warming is h【avin\g on /their lifest/yle. Lohuizen,】 on the other h】【and, /visited various part\s of the【 w\orld,】 meeting with sc】ientists, envir\onmenta】lists and vulnerable com】munities /to find out ab】out the reality of/ 【what is happening to our m/elti】ng ic【e ca\p\s.\ Each photo in t\he e/xhibition shows the sta\rk reality facing t】his part o【f the world thank//】s to t\ourism, the depleti/on of gas an】d natural resources and heavy ocean p【oll/ution.More infoWords: Bianca /Barr\attShare this arti/cle 【 / More f】\rom life9ZDJ

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6VqhAgriculture i【s facing a/ hi【storical challenge. In the next 3】0【 【ye【ars, food /demand will【 increa】se\ by 70 %.Facing this, it /will be necessary to i【ncrease an【d/ improv【e /production, /but al\/so】【 to lim】】it its impact on the env/ironment.Research/ers at Bio Sense institute, in Novi Sad, Serbia ar\e connecting sta【te-of-the-art technologies to crops to /cha【nge the productive model.Their mantra: "we c/annot feed\ today's world wit】h yes【ter//day 【agriculture".\And that is al/so】 the driving force behind t/he An【tares European project, which has developed a centre for ad/vanced technologies a【nd sustainable agric】ulture in this Se】rbian city located alongside the Danube.The【 Research/ Institute fo【r/ Information Technologies in】 Biosystems/ is part 】o【\f a Euro\pean funded programme to wide\n the participati/o】n of\ memb【er states and/ associated countr/i/【es who are lag【ging behind/ in /terms of res】earch and innovation.The Digit\al FarmAgriculture of the 【futu【re wil/l use 】advanced】 technologies, such as s/e【nsors, robots, drones, big data and sa】t\ellit】e/ ima/g/er/y."With a growing popul【a】tion, we need \to produce in t】【he/ next 40 years as much fo【od as we did in the pa】st 1/0000 years to\ do /that\," explai/ns Antar【es project coord】in/ator/ and electro\nics engi【ne】er, Vesna Bengin."We n【e\ed 【sensors a\nd senso】rs and some more sensors and some artific】ial intelligence on top of t【hat....to make our culture m【ore efficie\nt."Micro and nanoel】ectroni】cs de【\v/ices ena/ble farmers to c【heck th】e general s\ituation of the crops an】d sp/ot 【potential diseases at/ very early stages."Soil sensors will give 【you \the in\formation w/hen\ to irriga/t/\e and th/en not so you can diminish t\he amount of water tha\t】 is used for the ir】rigation \pro【cess," says 】Goran Kitić,/ the head of the nano-mic【ro-elec\tr】onics/ laboratory at the Biosense institute./"B】\ut/\ also we\'【re developing som\e sort of s【olutions that tell you how much of the food【 for /the plant is i/n the so\il h\ow muc【h nitrogen is in/ disarray."Several 'Digital Farm' pilot projects have alread/y been la】/\un/ched in Serbia."Digital【 agri【culture 】is t/he agric/ulture based on heavy u/s/e of d\ata\ so tha【t we are trying to 】colle/ct d】a】ta【/【 in opp【ortunis】tical【ly 【fr/om【 sensors,/ from 】the soil, fr\om plants, animals, sate/llites, drones you name it, in/ any p/ossible w】ay," e\xplain】s "d【irector of the Bi】o Se【n【se Instit【u/te,】 Vladimir Crnojević."And then 【to】 u】se the l/a/test 】closure like artificial intelligence, bi】g\【 data concept to find \s/om\e h】idden kn/o【wledge that is not】 obvious."The 】Agrosen【se platf【ormThe virtual】 【counter\part of the Digital 】Fa/rm \is the Agrosense platform.This comprehens】iv/e/ database a【llows farmers to 【plan\ the/ir\ activit【i/es and bett/er m【onit\or crop conditions, d\ue to figu/res comin】g from different sources, such as robots,\ 】optical se/nso\rs, algo\rit【hms, meteorolog】ical st/a】tions an】d satellite data.\"T【h/e system we currently use can iden\ti\fy proble/ms o/n \】a l【eaf, a fruit o【r a vegetable, so we can react \earlier\ th\an \when we might detect it. When w】e【 realiz/e【 it,【 the p【lant is already si】ck, whi】le\ \the camera and t】he\ sensors can de【tect the 【beginning of the disea】se\, " says fa\rmer/,【 Djordje Dju\kic.Satel】lit】e images coming from Copernicus\ European Earth Observatio/n Progr\amme, along with drone thermal vie/ws and smartphone's photos pr【ovide f\ur【t】her in-dep】th inf【ormation about the biol】ogical paramete【rs\ of the /crop and\ t】he f\ield.F】armers c【an al\】so exchange data, send】 pictures,】 rec//eive information o【n how much fertili/zer to use to dispense o】r how to 】optimize irrigation, via sm【ar【tphone apps.Real-time anal【ysis of the \g】【/round properties can be deli\/\vered direct【\ly【 on-/s】ite \by a/ robot /mov】ing n 】a\utonomously through the field and sam】pling the soil.This allows designers to t/a\ilor-make/ the land ma\nagement sys\tem, even on small p\articl/es of the f】ield."This will【 give you the 】results in 1【0 minutes 】an/】d 】you will instantly /know what】'/s the /si】tua/tio】n li\ke, you \w】ill hav【e// a map and\ th/is /wil】l help the 】】farmer to【 be more efficient," sa】ys Goran/ Kitić, the head of nanomicroelectron/ics lab】or】atory at th\e Bios/ense ins/titu/te.The【 resurgenc\e of woodThe c\onst\ruct\ion sector worldwide is res】ponsibl【e for one\-third of al】l the CO2 emission【s and 40% of\ all the/ 】】wastes.Bu\【t sci【entists】 \be/lieve that wood can /ha\ve great】 potential as a carbon sink and offset o/f CO2 emissions. Woo【d has been o】ne of】 the mos\t /exploit\ed b【uilding ma\te\rials throughout history. Mode/rn time】s has s【ee】\n/ 】the 】dominatio\n of ste】el and concrete\, but wood 【is【 once 】again on \the rise.In【 \】Slovenia, the InnoRene【w【 CoE project, a/ r/esearch centre \】/of excell【ence has been crea\t/ed【 to/ deve【lop new b/uilding mat】erials based o【n wo】od and recyc\l/able na\tural prod】u/ct/s."T/imber constru】ctions, /as well 【as the search for new materials \based on natural products】, are ab/out to become more common."By combining c\hemi【str【y/ and com/puter science, material science, we can cr/e】at】e mat【erial that\ can be used in the building where the /people are f/eeling the p【\ositive impacts on the【ir percept】io\n tow【ards the livi/ng\ environment," sa【ys Andreja Kutnar, InnoR【enew CoE project /coordi】nato/r and /p】rofesso/r 】of wood science and tech【nology a】t t\he University of Primors】ka, Koper."/】it's \very sustainabl】e .\..because \when w】e cut/ the【 t\ree 【at the same tim】【e w/e pla\nt another one"Wood /】m\】odification/】 process【es also al】low desired proper】ties to be produ//ced by m\eans \of \【chemical, 】\biologica\l or phy【sica【l agents. And this can co】ntribute t/o re/ducing the envi】ro\nmental footprint and /economic cost【 o】f wood 【maintenance."Wood is basically the champi】on of all the r\enewab】le ma【terial. \】It's not only it's carbon neutral it's actually carbon negative. 【So basically when /you make a wooden house not only you【 d/idn't \r/ea\lly emit any CO2 we were actually s】toring】 it /in the【 construction /itself," says Iztok &Scaro/n;u&/scaron;ter&s/caro】n;i【69; , a research group le\ader at/ the Innorenew Cen\tre of 【Excellence (CoE).Architect/s】 are【 \also lookin\g with interes】t at【 wood【【 【as a we】ll-being solution. A topic of our interest is i\ts con/nection to t【he\ well-bein\g of p】eople. "How 【【buildin/gs can reduce stress. How it can improve health," says Eva \Prelov【&scar【on\;ek Ni\/em\el】ä, a\n【 a】rchitect at Innorenew CoE.Scientific evidence h\as\ confirmed the positiv/e /imp【act of wood in w/orkin】g and li【ving spaces.Michael Burnard,\ the de\puty di\rector of the Innorenew Centre of Ex\cellen】ce say【s "people tend to find t/\he material mo/re pleasant to th】e tou/c【h and nic】er to work】 with."Researchers at the U\niversity of Primorska】 】hav/e also【 \bee【n studying\ prope/rtie】s hidden in natural sustainable ma】terials, as for example\, Cann】abis sativa.Its】【 fibre\s are unde/【rgoing】 a r\enaissance withi【n the construc\tion sec/tor, because of t【h\eir /m/echanical properties"What is in】\teresting is th】e 】m/】echanical performance of i/ts fibres, whic\h\ are almost s\】imilar to】 glass fi\bres】," expla\ins 】Laetitia M】ar】rot, /a researcher, at the I\nno【renew CoE."The he/mp plant is/ also used as an i\nsulation】 material, allowing the house to breathe. The plant will /naturally absorb /m/oisture whe】n there is too much 】or it will re/lease it when t\here is not enough in the air."Pairing the construction s【ector with su/staina\b/l【e/ forestry management cou\ld gener/ate a whole slew of a【ddition/al 【economic, social,】 and environmental b\enefits.1212121/2121212/12J】ournalist n【ame • K】】at/y\ DartfordShare this article】Copy/p\as/te the art】icle video 】embed /link below/:CopySh/areTweetSha/res【endShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareS\hare/Shar【eSendShare】S/hareYou might also like 【【 \ \ Italian/ sc/ientists believe jell【yfish will soon be a brand new \del\ic\acy in Eur/ope 【 / / 【 【 】 】 /\ Latest cutting-edge tech\nolo/gy showcased at J】apan【 trade show 【 【 】 【 \ 【 Cementing the future: the EU's【 ECO\B\/INDER pr\oject 】takes a /hard【 look at concre【te 【 / / / / Mo】re aboutEnvironme【ntal prote【ctio/nNew technologiesResearchAgri/cul\tureArchitecture 】 【 M】ost viewed 【/ 【\ 】 】 】 】 Wha/t influence on climate i//s the coronavirus loc/kdown really having? \/ \ 【 The new AI system\ safeguarding pr\ema\tur\e babies fr\om infect】ion \ / 】 【 Messeng/er/ RNA: the molecule that may teac【【\h our b/\odies to beat cancer \ Appl/e【 and Goog【le say the】y'll work together to trace spr【ead of coronav\irus via smartpho】nes / 【 \ \ 】 】/ How EU funding is】\ chang【ing the face 】【\of Lat】vi\an innovation 【 / / Browse today's tagsPEYK

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