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AG永久入口💰【ag88.shop】💰全讯网导航Good c/hemis/【try: helping busine】/ss to come w】ithin REACH rulesText sizeAaAaT/he Osc\ar-winning actor and\ fi【lm produ】c/e/r is no longer just the Wol/f\ of 【Wall 【Street, or our beloved Jack from Ti/tanic, he&\【rsqu/o;s now a ful\ly-fle【【dged env\i】ronm\e】ntalist on a mission.L【eading 【the c\harge on World E\arth\ Day every year, Di【Ca/prio this year released a '/We Lo\ve 【The Earth'/ music vid【eo aiming to【 make people【 think twice about the/ w】ay 】they treat the planet. He 】a【l/so made a 【do【c】um/enta\ry【 in 2016 with Nationa/l Geographic, 'Before The Flood【', where he m【et s【cientist/s, activists and \world le【ade】rs to d【i\scuss the dange【rs of climate change.Read more | How Justin Bieber 】shut down an Ic/eland\ic /beauty sp】otBack in\ 2015, DiCaprio decided to take the plung\e and purc/】hase an island in Belize \to bui\l【d his very own eco-resort, s\et to 】be \&l】dquo;\g\rou/nd-breaking in/】 the environmental movement.&rdquo】; 【The island in /qu\estion, Blackado/re Cay【e, was sold fo\r ./75 m\il/li/on to DiCaprio and his bu\siness】 partn\【er, who h\ave/ been working ever since to\ create an eco-haven in Central America, which is //s\et /t\o open in 2020.\Where exactly is it and why has/n’t it opene\d yet?\【B】lackad\/ore Caye island is sit【uated off the coa\st of Belize\, with a diverse ecosy\s】tem/ of land and /marine【 species/【 that is recognise】d g/\lo/【bally as part【 of the ‘Mesoamerican B/iological Corrido\【r&rs/qu/o;\ region. Nea\rly 1.5 million tourist 【visit Belize each y/ear, to stay in【 beachfront cottages an\d luxur】y hotel【\s alike. But Le】/onardo DiCaprio’\s e\co-reso【rt could】 mark a】 【revolutionary change to tourism i/n t/he area, as visitors would【 come \f【o/【r a &l】dquo】\;rest【orative experie】nce” o\n th/eir s】ust\ainable stay.BelizeGetty ImagesAlexander \HafemannThe eco-resort was supposed 【to o\pen in 2018, but the team anno/【unced that the opening was to be delayed u/ntil【\ late 2019 as it was still incomplete. This /year, it is pr\esumed that th\e/ new opening is to be in 2020】, as the pro/ject has been o/n 】hold while envi\r【o】/nmental /【studies and permi】ts have been】 /issued b\y th】e governm【e】nt of Belize.What would the eco-resort b\e like?The isl】and【 \has suffere\d from overf【ish\in\g, an er\o【din/g coastline and deforestation \of its m\angrove tree/】s for/ years. DiCaprio’s resor\【t is hoping to be the eco-\f/riendl/y /answer to 】the/ 104-acre island’【s environmental problems throug\h building ‘off-t【he-grid liv\ing h】omes’ /and a research\ station focused on climate chang/【e. It plans/ to be the &\l】squo;World’s】 fi\rst/ truly/ restorative is【la\nd/ develo】pment’.Related | An eco-f【riendly twist on【 Alexa C】hung's Glaston【bury styleWhen it 【finally opens, the e/xclusive eco-resort will /jo【in Belize【's Four S】e\asons H【otel, wh/ich is also/ due/ to open in th\e near future as a green destinat\i】on.M\ock /up of Four \Seaso\ns Hotel, Be/lizeCourtesy】// of Four Sea\sonsDiCaprio's e】co-resort will feature a h【otel, 】36 resort bungalow】s and 36 e】stat】】e villas, with details 【s】uch as ‘circadian/ l【ighting’ and solar panels 】so t】hat 】each ho】me i】s energy e】ff【icient. Outdoor a\nd indoor ex\periences will be m【erged with open-air buildings/ /surrounded by 】palm t【rees, lush, green landscap\es an】d infi\n【//ity po/ols.\Footbridge ove】r river i\n【 tranq/uil fore/st in BelizeGetty ImagesTim He】sterWith un/rivalled sunset views, Blackadore Caye is 【being described a】s t/he Maldi\】ves of Central A【merica.W】hat d\oes Leonardo 【DiCapri】o have to say?Di\Caprio is an avid scu】ba diver. In fact, it was【/】 his/ f【irst trip /to Beli【z\e 【\to swim【 in】 its barrier reef i】n 2005【】 \that sparked the ac\tor&\r/squo;s love\ of th\e islan\d.In an interview【 wi】th The New Y】ork Ti【mes, Leonardo DiCapr/io said/ about the eco-resort:“The \m\ain focus is to do\ \something that wi\ll cha/nge the world. I couldn&rs【quo;t have gone】 to Belize and built on an \isl】and an【/d don】e something 】like t】his, i\f it weren’t for the【【 ide/a \that it \could be groun\/】【d】-break\ing i\n the environ\me【ntal movement.”Leonardo DiCaprioReuters&【ldquo;Wi\th】 th/【e onset o【\f clima【te chan/ge, ther【e are huge challenges, \so we want the structure to \not o\nly en\hanc/e and improve the environment, but to be a m/odel fo【【r the/ future./”Sha\re this\ arti】cle \ More from placesWhat is Earth Day/? | Euronew【s answers【Coron【【/avirus in Europe:】 W【h】/y has Portu【gal not been as ba】dly hit by /COVID-19 a\s n\e/ighbour【 S\pai【n?Nigerian women revolutionising Fine Art 【\Founda/tion promot【es sustainable food 【product/i】【onAl\uis/io Sa/m\pa】io Dos Santos i【n Braz/il, Nixo】n Mutis in Colombia】, Ag\udo// Quill【io in the Philip】pines, Rah\】mat Hakimin/ia in Iran.These a【re s【ome of t】he 164 peopl\e /who los/t th/eir lives for d【e\fe\ndi/ng the environ】ment f】ro\m 'menacing industries' in 2018, said a human rights NGO\.That’s【\ mo\re than three people murdered on average ea】\ch 】week, according to a new \repor【t by UK-based Global Witness rele\ased on【 T/uesday.The 】P】h【ilippi/nes had【 the hig\hest number of\/ /kill/ings o\f any count【ry with at leas【t 30 environment d\efe/nders m/\urdered i【n【/ 2018. This is th】e fir【/st time the\ Asian Pac/ific country is at the t\op 】/of\ the lis】/t\ since the NGO reporting such deaths in 2012.Guatemala\ /recor】ded the sharp\e【st ri【se in murders, which【 jumped more than five-fold — m/aking it】 the deadl【/iest 】country pe】r capita.Europe continues to】 be the less af】fected contine\nt with only three \repor【ted deat】hs/, all of them in 】Uk\raine.Increase in killings relat\ed to conflicts over wat\erIn the【 /9 \cou/ntri【es \surveyed, m】ining was linked to 43 】deaths\. Attacks i\n the ag【/ribusiness sect【or were the se/cond cause of d】eat【h (21 \murders). There was a/ four-fold incr/ease in k【illings related to conflicts over/ w\ater/ in 2018 (17/ \murd/ers)/, underli】ning/ the dead\ly cons\eque】nces of warmer tempera/tures, erratic ra】infall【 and【 d/\iminishing groundwater, parti【cularly i】n Latin A】mer/ica, Africa and South】 Asia】, said the report.The a/tt\acks were connected to\ opposition to/ proliferating hydropower projects, as\ well as corruption in the management of local wa/ter 【sources, Alice Harrison, a ca/mpaigner at【【 Global W】itness, told the Th【oms\on Re/ute】rs Foundation."With climate【 b\rea\kdown and in/creasing【 dro/ught, it is【 hi\】ghly likely that \we'll be【gin to see a 【【rise in co】nflicts over water sources involving 】【w【hoever controls them," s/he added【.Duterte'】s reign\ of terrorHarrison poi/nted ou/t that muc【h of t\he persecution of land defenders was driv/en by the 【demand for land a\nd 】raw materials found in everyda【y prod/ucts, "from fo\od to mobile phones, to jewel【le【ry"."This tr【end on\ly/ \looks 】set to wor【sen as strongmen poli【ticians around the w【o【r\ld【 are stripping away environmental and human r/ights protections to pr】o】mo】te busi/nes】s at any cost," 【she said in a stat【ement.N【earl\y 300 farmers, indigenous people and human r/i【g\hts a\ctivists hav【e\ b】【een kill\e【d si【nce Philippine P\resident 】】【Rodrigo Duterte took o】ff/ice in 2016, accor【ding to Philippine human righ\ts group】s.“The Duterte re/gime/'s inte【nsified militarisation of communit/ies has had cata】s【t/rophic effects," said\ Cristina】【 Palabay,【 secr】】【e\tary-general of lan】【d \right\s group\ Kar【apatan."The exp/anded【 power /given to the police】 a/nd 】the m】】【ilitary has \suppr/essed diss【ent and promoted threa/ts, h/arassment and /attacks a/ga\inst acti\vists a/nd】 human rights defende【rs," sh\e said.Intimidat【i】on of environmental defenders on the riseWhi\le there were fewer deaths re】ported than i】n 2017 (207 in /17) Global Wi【tness also reco/rded the i【\ncreasing use of 【lawsuits, a\rrests/, and\ /death threat【s to【 intimid】ate 【ac】tivists 】】even in develo】ped countries.The\ re】port 【takes t/he\ case of Iran where environmental defe/nders are cons【idere【d to be】 te【/rrorist/s \or 【enemies/ of the state, citing t\he case】 of nine \activists i\mpr】isoned on spyi\ng\ cha/rges.Global Witness also note】d the \repression of anti-fracki\ng protests in the UK】\】 by \changing so\me national laws to ban cer\ta\/in demonstrations.The \NGO called out the rol】e of investors — li】ke development 【banks — play in facilitating the violati】on of\ activis\ts' rights to protest.S\ha】re this articleShareTweetSharesendShareTweetShare【send/MoreHide【ShareS】【e/n//dShareShareShareSendShareSh\ar\eYou m\igh/\t also like / 【 \ Watc【\h: Farmers create 【natural straw intend to break plastic�】39;s back \ \ / 【 / 】 EU's youngest com】m【issi\o/ner on how to turn cli/mate crisis around 【 / / / \ 】 】 'Inc【redible win for n】ature】9;: Plans】 to drill in Great/ Australi【an Bight abandoned 】 】 More aboutE/nviro【nme【ntEnvironmental pr】ot\ectionEnvironme】ntal \i/ssues \ \ B【row\se today�/39;s tags,见下图

Danish billio\n】aire plans to b/uild idyllic vil\lage in【 Sc\ot/\land to stop land】 becomi//ng de\relict

T】ext sizeAaA/aOne ma【n's t】ra/s\h is\ another\】 man's treasure/ - and some people 【build a house out of it. F\or example, thousands of glass bottles can make an ent】ire hous【e\ or chapel, such as Edou】/ard Arsenault's Bottle H\ouses in/ Cape/ Egmon/t, Pr\ince Edward /Island, Canada. He used 2】5,】000 mul【ticoloured bottles to erect t/hree buildings in 】the /'80s. Today it \is a must-see tou/\rist】 attraction.If ther/e is no glass, plastic \bottles can make /a very 【fi\ne alterna\tive. After losi\n【g her\ h【ouse in an earthqua/ke in El\ Salvador, 】87/-yea/r】-old Maria】 Pon】ce【 built a new\ home with \plastic bo/ttle【s, which 【she h【ad】 collecte/d throughou】t se/ven 】months from roadside trash.Maria Be【rsabe Po/nce, 87, st/【ands outsi】de he【r hou/s】e made out】 of \plast/ic\ bottles in the vi】llage of El Borbo】llonReuters/Jose CabezasWood,】 rocks and even an old bus can m\ake a very u】n【ique house,/ such as \the【】 one in Japan, /pho/tographe【d by Christoph Ru【pprecht, a geographer【 from Australia, according to who\】m, this quir/ky house【 \】was built e\【ntirely 】ou】t of discarded trash an\d recycled materials.House made entirely ou/t o\f recycled materials in JapanFlickr/Christoph Rupprecht】Unable\ to find 】【a【 suitab【le/ house,【】 Egyptian Ta/ymour 【El】-Had【idi 【made a big step toward【】s his dream of having/ an environ【mentally friendly home in 2012. /Four years】 /la\ter he【 moved int\o \a small castle【 in Cai【ro, w/here /all the walls, ceilings, windows and \even be【ds are ma【de of rec\ycled\】 material such as discarded concrete block】s, red bricks \a/nd glas/s bot【tles.If yo/u do not have concrete or d\iscarded bricks,】 a few thous/and g\l/a/ss bottles \can be of \h\elp. Si/ngle \mother Ivon【e Martins made a DIY home in \B\【r【azil using\ thousand】s of discarded bottle【s.Hit play the vid\eo a】bove to learn more about these homes m/】ade of garbage.Share thi【s a/rticle M】ore 【fr】om lifeI/nside Bu\dapest's \green new campusHow to make your start-up busi/ness sus\tainable from day oneTe【xt sizeAaAaEarl/】ier this\ ye】ar Glasto【nbur】y Fes\tival made hea/dlines b/y annou\ncing t\h\at it wi/ll implement a site-wide ban on plast【ic bottles sta】rt/ing in 2019. All over the world, musi】c festival【s of all【 size/s are becoming \increasi】n/gly c\onscious of their\ ecolog\ic】al footprint.According to P【owerful Thinking, an/ organi【zation that works with festivals t】o l\ower their envir【onment】al footprint, 】i】n the【 United Kingdom alone summer music festivals are resp【onsib】le for ap\proximately 100 kilotons \of CO2 (including audie/nce travel), 23,500 tons of w\aste an】d 5 millio】【n li【ter/s 】of diesel \con【sumpti】o\n.But it/ do】esn’t have to b】e this way\. Mo\re an/d more fe\stivals /are takin【g sustainability and environm【ental co\ns】iderat/ions ve【ry【 se】rio\usly so\/ that you【, the festiva【l-g】oe【r, ca】n party it up the gr\een wa】y. One such【 【f】e【stival is Budapest&rsq】uo;s Sziget Festiva\l, which has won 】Best Li】ne-U/p a】nd /Best Major F\es\tival at 【t\he Europea【n F】estival/ Awards 】sever\al ti\mes. We sat down wit\h】 Akos Do\minus, Sz\iget’s Sustainab】ility Manager for the past 17 ye【ars, to find out what】 】they/&r\squo;r/e doing to【 keep Sziget as green as 】possible. V【iew this post \o/n\ InstagramW\hich re-cup】 d/id/ you ch\oose to take h【ome \wi【th you? :) #sziget #szigetofficial #szigetlove\\revolution #j【ointheloverevolution #\SZIGET2018 #recups】 #/sziget2019 #ec/oA post shared b/y Szi/【get Festival (@sz\igetofficial) on Sep 】1G\r【eece \told to �/39;save your 【paradi\se as oi】l \compa【n【ies move in,/ 2018 at 5】:35\am PDTWh【e\n did Szi【get really【 start focusing on s】ustainability? What cam【e first &n】d//ash; the demand for/ sustaina【bility fr/om the visitors or /your own s】ense/ of //responsibilit】y?"The latter and it started a v】ery lo\ng time ago. M\an/agement m\ade t\he\ decision to make gre【at】er efforts in terms of sustainability in 2002】 an【d I jo\ined in 2003 to start \working on it. Back then sustainability【 at f/estival【s was mostly co】nfined /t\o was\te manag\ement but【 over the/ years we began to develop a wi\der ran】ge of activit\ies in various spher\es【 of the f】estival."What ste/ps hav\e \you taken in the 【pa【st few yea\rs to/ become more green and what【 can we】 \/expect this y【ear?"I thi【nk that the big/\ge\st neg/ative effect of the festival is waste so ou\r prio\ri/ty is re】ducing and recycling waste, thi】s is ou\【r flagship en\vironmental project. Through the years, we focused mostly on r/ecy/cling【 but s】ince la【st yea\r m】ade huge step t\owards actu/ally re【ducing was】te. We don’t allow pla/stic bags 【【to be sold a【【t the fest/ival/ an/d\ th\e food vendors cannot give out plas\ti\c】 plat】es or /cutlery (i【\t must be made of biodegradable material). Last /yea】r we launched a /new c/ampaign to r\educe the number 】【/of /straws and\ managed to cut use by 50%."S\ziget\】 Festival's "Don'【t Suc\k!】"【 camp【aignKris】】z/ta Csányi"\We also try to pro\tect the gro/un【d and soil by c/over【ing 1】【0,000sq. meters with special covers and then recultivate it. Last /year, f/o【r example,/ we recu】ltivat/ed about 3 a】cres.【 We are also\ constantly experimenting with and】 implementing wa】ter saving】 【【te【chniques such as vacuu/m 【to【ile/t】s/ whi/ch can sa】ve 85% of 【w】ater use \(i/.e. 1.5 liters of water p\er flush instead 】of】 10 liters).""We are a\lways thinking of mo【r/e n【ew campaigns to【 save water./ Last year we employed /a/\ “gu\err\il\la” awarene】ss campaign and found that through some easy】 communicat【【ions \measures we \can enc/ourag】】e\ visitors who are c】amping to shower mor\e eff【iciently. 】/We a【lso \】had /workshops with Cli/mate-KIC alumni】 /in t/he previo】us years and al\w/ays have the\se trash【 fas\h\ion workshops where peo/ple can m】a【k】e festi【va\l accessories \【out o/f waste. T/his year, we have even more sustainability ini\tiatives in \store, whic】h\ w】e will announce on Eart/h /Day (April 22/nd)!"Trash Fas【hion wor【kshop at Sziget FestivalSziget Festival"Those who like t/\o camp at festivals ca【n】 //opt【 for resting their wary bo【dies at the EcoCamp, a special【ized camp\site on the festival g】round】s that uses solar 【】p】ower \and\ boa/st】s】 a slow /food bar that encour【ag【es peop】le/ to live a slow a/n/d sustainable life."Eco C/】】a】mping at Sziget Fest/】ival\】Sz】iget FestivalSolar pow/er at Sziget's Eco\ Cam】pin\g groundSz/iget Festival"Be】/cause /tran\sport\ is 】resp\onsible for a【 very significant part of /a fes【tival’s carbon footprin\】t, we&rs\quo;v/e undertaken a lot of different tactics to re\duce the n】egative/ effects: we offer\ bu\ses/ and boats /to the fe\stival\, provide bike facilities and actively dis】c/ourage visitors thr】ough variou】s c【ampaigns from dri】vi\ng their】 cars here.】""Another in/itiative that /we've had over the pa/st few years w/as 】encouraging pe】ople to \donate their tents to【 charity because it&r】s\quo;s actu/ally a huge issue on a European level. Tons o\f tents a/nd oth/e\r camping】 gear are left behind at festivals so this way we \t\ry to collect them and give away\ to char/ities, like t\he H】ung/ar\ia】n Charity Servi/ce of t/h\e Order of Malta."Tent donation pointSz/\ige【【t FestivalAre【 there any other festivals out ther/e that are】 】really leading the way and can be considered ro【le m】o/dels】 】in \the sphere of s\ustainable party\ing?"There】\ is a /clear/ tendency of【 introduc\i\ng green efforts at \most festivals: we&rs\qu【o;\r【e see】ing a kind of “green&r】dquo; 【】】compe\tition because /th\e y【ounger generat/ions is putt\ing huge press【ures on the festival industry to /be m【o【re sustainable. Glastonbury bann\ed plas\tic bottle/s and】 】we'd like to fo/llow 】【suit in the fut】u/re\."Workshop at Szi】get Festival's "R【\e】cycling C【e/nter"Sz【iget Festival"Many festi\vals are exp\erim\ent\ing with energy effici】ency projects but,【 unf\ortunately, 】so far there\ ha【【s been【 no 【b\reakthro/ugh because festivals 【simpl】y need A【 LOT【 /of】 energy. Last year we used s【ola【r energy t\o power our illuminated banners【 but, of 】【cou\rse\, that’s a\ miniscule percenta】ge of\ the energy a fes/tival requires. On a】 larger scale, solar is 【sim】ply not\ viabl/e at the moment because turnover is 10-20 years, whils/t a festival only lasts several day\s to\ a we】】ek, \in /th【e 】ca】se of【【 Sziget. So, as an industry, we&rsq\uo;re very fa\r /away fr/om being able to use 【s/ol】ar to fully power a f【estiva】l【’s/ needs\."What role, in your opinion, do festival organiz】ers /have in shaping a genera【l 】“gr/een consciousness” /【among their att】ende】\es?"Huge. We all agree 【on that. Festiva】ls have \】a huge impact\ on yo】u/th. When people come to/\ a fest【ival they open their minds t\o le【arning and experienci/ng new thi\ngs. So there’s a【 con//sensus th/a\】t we d【o have a hu【ge 】responsibility/ to in/crease \environmental aw/are【ness."Waste Po\int at Sziget Fest【ivalKriszta /Csány/iWhat tips/advice/ would you giv【e【 attendees to enjoy themselves in a more sustainable way at Sz/iget 2019?"Sm\o】kers &nd【as【h; don’t throw【 】cigarette butts away o\n the ground, always look for a mo\bie ashtray. Find y\o【ur m【o\st environmentally friendly way to co【me to the fe】stival 【(【boat, t【rain, bus or even cyc】le) and use our rec【yc/li\ng/ 【bins."Share this a】rticl【e More from lifeText sizeAaAaMagda【le\na【 Herrera, director of pho】\tog/raphy at】 G/EO】 magazine, has a 【weal】th of exper【ienc【e in t\【he wor\ld o\/f photography and journalism, an/d a keen eye for an am【\azin\g image. /This made h/e/r id【eally place【d for her a【ppoin/tment as a judge for】\ th【e 2019 Eu\r【op】ean Wildlife Photographer o】f the Y\ear】./The competition, run annually b\y the So】ciety of German Nature Photographers and now\】 in its 19th year, challenges profession\al and no/n【-professional photo【graphers】 alike to 【provide th】e bes/t photograp/hy Europe has to offer/.Herrera too【k/ some time【 to talk t\o us ab】out the com/petition, what to exp】ec/t,【 and how photographers, a【s well as providin\g b\reathta【【kin【g image\s,】 can help drive positive engage\ment w//【ith t\he envir】onment.【Congratu\/lation】s on your ap【po】intment\ to t\he judging pa\nel for the GDT European Nature photographer of t】he Year 2019. How did you beco】me involved wit【h th】】is 【\co\mpe】tition】?&ldqu\o;I t】】hin/k some of the p】hotographers I wo/r/k\ with\ at Geo ha/ve】 s【uggest【ed that I partic】ipa】te. Geo is a magazine that 【is concer】ned with the 【en/vir/onment, nature /a【nd\ wildlife con【serva\tion.&rdquo\;Salvad】or Colvee【, Nebot Der/ Tanz 】D【es Okt【o【pus】W】hy 】do 】yo\u thin/k competitions such/ as this a\re i】mportant?“N】/【a】tu\re a】nd wildlife ph【otography is becoming increasingly po\pular. P【ho【tographers 【are our am/bassador\s an\d our eyes an\d these e】vents allow u】s 【to make the object of t【heir w/o/rk known/ to the widest possible 【au\dience. Tod/ay, it i】s/ important to highligh【t the natural beauty o/f o【ur pl/anet but /also t】/he dang\ers. /It/'s not just about beautifu\l p\ic/【ture】s.”H】ave you seen /many of the entries 】yet? What i/s the standard lik】e so far?“As far as I【 can se】e the standard is high!”Is】 there an【ything in particular you’】r【e hoping to s/ee in this year’s 【entri/es?“I hope /】to see, as wit\h any photo, something that sho/ws com/plexity or tension, behaviour, activity a\nd threat too.&rdqu/o;Is there a cat【egory that you particula\rly appreciat\e or enjoy?“I have to say, I love all of the】m\ \but I am 】part【icularly intere】sted in the 】K7 \one (the one that focuses o】n the beneficial or】 n【\egative rel【ationsh】ip /bet【ween humans /and nature).【Cristobal【 Serran\o, Der PoolWhy do/ you /th【i/nk it is \important 】for the competition to exp【lore this particul【ar topic?“It is important not t【o separate /the animal fro\m the human and to sh/ow th【【is relations】hi】p, which\ can /be de】structive (o\n\ the part of humans). W【e share a p【lanet where everyone must find t【heir 【place.&rdqu【o;To what ex/tent is nature photo\graphy a\ble to re/flect on the【 efforts of c\onservation 】a】nd/or reveal\ what/ more nee【ds to be done?】 Wha/t【 are its limi\ta】tions?“Nature photogr\ap/hy sho/ws us 【an ov【e】rview of the situati【on, s】/ometimes in a very aesthetic form, but in recent【 years/ it has evolved 【into\ a photography t\hat r/evea】ls【 a context \that, 【like any】 documen/tary photography, explores th】e re/lations/hip of the living to a territ//ory. In this se】nse/, it s】trongly【 concerns us all.”/W/ords: Dan【ny \McCanceHeader: Joel Brunet, Ein /Gemaelde d【es LebensShare this artic\le 【 More fr【om placesIc【eland's lar】gest national p\ark is h】oping to【 /gain UNESCO World\ Herit\age sta】tus at UN committe】e talks in】 Azerbaijan/.Vatnajökull Nati【onal Pa】rk is home to vast glaciers, utterly uni\nh【abit【ed land and ten ac\】tive v\olcanos. Despite the presence of o\p】posing elements/, the great land】scape h\as remained st【ab【l/e【 for/ more than 1,000 years. The meltin【g ice from the /glaciers f【uels some of Iceland'】s most powerful rivers. T】he seasonal ebb 】and flo\w of the ice 】i】s 【crit】ical in mainta/】】ining the/ sta】】bilit\y of the ecosystem of】 /Vatnaj&o】um】】l/;kull\, wh】ich covers 14% of Iceland.Now, however, r/ising temperatures are causing the gl【aciers to melt at unprec/e/d【ented rates. Every/ y\ear, more ice disappears,/ r/evea【ling 】new la\nd underneath the glaciers. In the/ last \century】 alone】, Vatnajök\ull has lost 10% of its volume.The a/re【a is so unlike /anyth】ing else /o\n earth that it has been used as a case study by as/tronauts. In the months pr\eceding the Apollo 11 mission in the late six\ties, Neil Armstrong and his c/olleagues visited the 】park to \study its l】un【ar】-like/ terrain. Som/e a】reas\ of Vatnajökull Nati\onal Park are utterly uninhabited by /lif】e, \be it animal o/r plan\t, render\ing it an ideal】 place to \stud\y moon-like geology.Water, fire /and ice, the elemen/ts that】 make up 【the uniqu\e park【 ar【e represen】ted on t/he nati\onal f\lag of /Ice\la】n【d, blue fo/r water, red for fire, and white】/ for ice. If granted /Wor\ld Heritage Sta【tu】s, Va\tnajöku】ll National Park】 \wil【l b【e the third】 Icelandic site to】 a\chieve the status.Want more【 news?】Video editor • Fr\ancois RazyShare this a【\/rtic】leCopy/pa\ste the 【ar【ticle video emb】ed /link【 bel【ow:CopyShareTweet【S//ha\resen\dShareTweet\SharesendMoreHid【eShar【eSendShareShareShareSe】ndShareShareYou m【ig/ht also l/ike 】 】 / \ 【 / 【 \ \Climate Change top of t\he agen\da as No【rdic mi【niste/rs m/ee】t /Germ/any's Merkel in Iceland 】 【 【 / 【 【【 \ 【\ \Tens of t】housands of Estonian】s perfo/rm mass folk singin【g 】 / \ 】【 Well-being agenda: d/oes this spell/ the e\nd for GDP? \ 】 More abou\t20-seconds【Icel\andEnvironmental protec/tionUNESCO Cultur】a/l 】Heritage ListEnviro/nment / 【 Browse today�【39;s ta】gs,如下图

How to become a 【】more sustain\able\ me【at eaterRoc【k star 】pol\i【tics 】in Romania

Text sizeAaAaOn 】the】 one hand, one of 【the bigg\est environmen/tal issues in the European\ Uni【on\ is how to reduc//e food wast\e and t【ackling issues around water【 s【carcity across the 【supp/ly chain.In the UK alone, food/ waste is e/\stimated to have the【 【value of more than £20 bi\llion (equ\al to &e】uro;.78 billion - approximately the GD】P of Cyprus) 【a year, s\ays UK ch【ar【ity WR】】AP.On 【the【 other/ hand, textil/es acco\unt for】 a 【/quarter/ of the environmental pollution in the region.So when it come\s to\ s【ustainable clothing, foo/d can play an impor】tant role, and /the\re ar】e already some outstanding 【examples 】out there starting from an innovative natural textile made from pineapple leaf 【&\#642;bre to ma】king\ \milk fibre.Th\e latter i】s made 【from high concentrations of casein, a milk prote\in. In fact】, /the【 techn【i\q\ue is not /ne/w. \In the 】&l】squo;30s, I】talian ch【【emist and/ e【ngineer An/tonio Fer\retti came up wi【th/ the idea 【and patented it under t】he】 na\me, L/anital\. Howeve/r, \the m\arket so\on mov\ed on to cheaper/ synthetics.It【alian fashion/【 designer An/tonella Bellina dusted off this old /tech/n/ique for her new ran】ge.Cl【ick on the vid/eo and \see how /she make\s fabric out o【f milk in T【usca】ny.\Share】 this【 ar/tic【l/e / More from 【style

如下图

环保网Robinson Crusoe isl\and sets example】 fo】】r/ 】the world in con\ser/vationOcean【【o】gr\a】phe\r and envir】onmentalist, Jean-Mi】\chel Cousteau, p【a】id/ his f/irst visit to th/e United Arab Emira【tes as 】part of his edu】cation【al conservation programm】e.During hi/s s\tay in the\ emi【rates, Co/ust\eau spoke/ /to more th】an 100 s【ch/oo/l children【 a】b\out the world\&r】squo;s fragile aqu【a【tic ec】osystem.&/ldquo;If you protect the ocean/, y【ou【 】/protec【【t/ yourself,”】 he told the】 you】ng a【udien\ce.】The interactive lear【ning initiativ【e is part of Co】ust\eau’s O【cean Futures Society, which he fo】unded in 1999 with the intention of giving “a voice to the ocean.”Je\a\n-Michel Cousteau teaches【 kids in/ 】th/】e UAE ab【out o】cean c/onse\r【vationABO】UT JEA\N-MICHEL COUSTEAUCoustea】u&rsquo\;s interest in \con】serving t/he \waters of/ the wo】rld b/egan around the ag【e】 of seven when he/ was /t【aken divin】g by his f【a【ther, the re\nowned explorer, fi/lmmaker and scienti】st Jacq【ues-Yve/s】 Couste\au.In /an 】interv【iew【 with Euron【ews, Jean-Michel sai/d that /it/ was his【 family which\ encouraged him\【 to share knowledge 】and start dialogues【 with】 】people to/ spread his ecological 】message.“I【've/ learned a lot of that fro\m my fath\er,&\r【dquo; h\e says.\ &ld/quo;You\ never【, n【ever criticize. Forget about\ that. 【You neve\r【/ point a finger】,】 bec】ause when you point a finger there are th/ree coming back at you.”“You try to have an oppo/r】tunity \to meet and then you ca【n reach each】 o】ther'/s\ h/earts,&rd【【quo; \he added.During h/is long 】career, 81-year-old Cousteau ha\s【 directed more than 80 【films/ and do\c】ume/ntaries, all themed】 on】 sa】fegu【arding the future of t】he planet’s se/as and oc【eans.His current \researc/h e】】xplores how ho//l/i【day resorts】 can minimize thei\/r environmental impact a【nd he recently campaigne/d aga/i【nst the captivi\ty of 100 whales 】\in Russia.Je【an-Michel C】ou/st/eau durin/g inter/view wit/h/ EuronewsWhilst】 plastics are/ a hot topic when i】t com\es t【o/ the 【poll/ution of glob】al ocea】ns, Cousteau is flagging up\ the【 haz】ards of lesser】-know】n】 【wa】】st【e prod\ucts tha】t end up 】in/ our water\wa】ys.】“There are\ hundreds of differen/t/ chemicals,” h\e says/. “\【You take a t】ablet】 of as\pirin and hopefully, it takes care of your headache, [but] where is that chemical going? Righ【t into t】he ocean.&rdquo【;】Cousteau also \highlighted /how p】olluted 】wat\ers had an affect on the human body,\ citing his【 own rece/nt m/edi【\】cal assessment for leve\ls of toxicity.“I was tested with 32 differ】ent t【ypes of chemicals a【nd two types \of heavy 】metal/s,” he revea/led.Jean-Michel Cous/teau /divin\gAs fo/r how to cur【b or elimi\nate dest】ructive environ】ment【/al factors, Co【usteau s/】a\id he bel/ieves that 【better management of natur/al resources【 wa】s 】key.\“/There are hug】e opportunities now to capture all these 】/runo/ffs,&【rdquo; he remarke】d. &\ldquo;And 【we can make】 money doing that because in nature there's n/o was/te, everything is a re【source.”Whils\t s/howing no signs of re/ti【ring】 from his passion of aq】ua】tic conserva【ti】\on, C/o/\uste】/au beli\eves【 that the future of his work is safeg/uarde/d by his son and daughter who are also involve/d\ in the\ 【scientifi\c disci/pline and “heading in the right dir【ection.&rdqu\o;SEEN ON SOCIAL: EXPLOR\ING THE REG\ION’S WATERSEkaterina from 【\Russia 【po【sted a picture of her d/ive to 【a ship wr\eck in Sudan. View 【this post on Inst\agramUnd【erwater SWAT. U【m\bria wreckA post shared by Katerina Kali/nina (@【guzuguzu】) on Mar 8/, /20【17 at 10:57am PST【And Andri\y fro【m U\kraine went\ 】for a dive with】 red fish in Egypt’s Re/d【 Sea\. View this 】post 】on InstagramLifeti】me memories ?&】z】wj;&\#9794;️???A pos/t shared by &\#1040;n【drey Deniskin (@a.\deniskin11) on May 18, 2019 at 8:02am PD】TShare this articleCopy/paste the 【a\rticle video embed l\in/k【 below:CopyShare】Tw】eetSharesen\dShareTweetSharese】ndMore】/\HideShareSendS/h\areShar/eSh】ar【eSend】ShareSh】areYou might also like \ \ Watch: 【Woman set /for epic/】 journey /f/lying migration route 【of endangered【 osprey / 【 / 】 Global energy dem】a】nd deba【/te\/d 】at 【Abu Dhabi Sustainabilit【y Week 】 /】 \ How 】is th【e UAE tackling its food【 waste problem? 】 // More abou\tEnvironmental protectionEcology【Oc【ean【United Arab Emi【rates 【 Browse today's tagsText sizeAaA\a&/ldquo;/It’s \unfa【ir t\o say they are jumping 】on t】he ba/n/dw/\agon, 】natur【e documentaries have always \been motivate\d by conse\rvation.” 【Sa【t in his office at University Col】le/ge L/ondon, lec】ture【r in/ sci/ence communication, Dr Jean-Baptiste Gouyon\/ expla】ins to /me \how nature documentaries/ have come \full circle by\ embracing th\【eir roots in envi/ronmentalism.【 In the early days of TV【, he reveals, f\ilms a\bout/ animals\ helped】 to estab【lish th\is brand new medium【 as 【/a source】 of trustworthy informa/tio/n. Docum】enting and catalo【】guing biodiversi】t\y, they told 【timeless stories of 】creatures no\/t s【o dissimilar to u/s.“Befo【\re \Attenborough was Atten/borough, it w/as common to see scientists 【at work,” Gouy/on says, but things began t\o change】/ as the \century wore on. With the i】nc】\reasing doom and gloom of environmen/tal cris/is loo【min【g ov\er the general 【population, film【makers rejec【ted 】stories abou【t wh\at was】 reall】y h\appenin】g to 【th/e pla【net. “\The【re 】was a documented reluctanc【e to eng【age with envi【ronmental is】sues, they d】idn&rsqu\o;/t】 wa\nt to push audiences 】away.”D】avid Attenbo【rough \makes a spee】ch /at /a cerem】on】y f/or \t/he\ naming of the RRS Sir 【D】avid Atte【nboro\ughAsadour Guzelian/ASSO【CIATED 【PRES【\/SAsadour GuzelianDuring the【 1990s, however, things began to change. “A s【hift in the cultural context has happe】ned and t】here is more acceptance \that 【we are in a bad sit\uation.” Having been bombarded with years of ongoing【 catastrophe, pe/o/ple had becom【e too w//】ell informed to keep tolerating a\【 w】a】te\red-down /version of【 the t【ruth. It has beco/me imposs】ible to ignore /he】/ says, “the state of【 the】 \plane/t i【s wh/at /it i【s.&【rdquo;Now 】we&rs】【qu\o】;re hooked. 14.1 million people watched\ the BBC&/rsquo;s【 27 series, Blue Planet II mak\ing it the】 most-watch【ed 】T\V prog】\ramme in Britain that 】year, /a\ccordin\g to the BBC. Natural history】 persona】/\li】ties lik\e David Attenborough have 】bec/ome big 【stars, successfully\ transf】/orming from amateur ecologists to/ folk hero【es for those p】lagued by eco-anxiety. We have beg\un to recognis【\e the p【ower of /t\he e】nvironme/nt/al film and\ its potential make us \think a lot harder a/bout t/ackling proble/ms lik【e plasti】c pollution.Waste from wors】h【i//p: solvin\g Indi\a's unique river pollution p】【roblemWATCH | Shrink【ing pelican b/reeding grounds restored after BP\ 【oil spillSerbia will plant 1 billion tre】e\s\ in【 o【rder to reach net zero t\ar\get by 205【】0The 】power of movi/ng pictu【res“There is no doubt that film as a mediu】m has massive power to elicit/ an emotional rea\ct/ion,】&rdq】uo; says\ Gouyon\, “but there isn’t 】really any】 hard evidence to/ prove this yet.&r】dquo【; More s/o than the\ writt】en w【ord, these documentaries 】seem to pique our interest/ in the\ p/lanet and poten】\ti/ally even d】rive/ 】us to take action. A sur/\vey of U】K superm/arket/ shoppers found th【at 88】 per】ce\//nt o【f people【 who watc】hed Blue Plan】et II\ had \changed their behaviour \as a resul【t.After watching th\e \series\, Da\río Fern&aa\cute;ndez-Bellona, a postdoctoral rese【archer at Univers】ity College 】Cork, noticed th【at th/e programme w】as consistent/ly \tr\ending on twitte/r the evening】 it aire】d. He started to wonder just how much these\ 】docum【entaries are able to affect our behavio\ur. Using 3000Saving the Sey】che\ll/es: plas\t\i【c 【washes up \on sho】res/ hardly t【ouched b】y \m\ankind twee\ts and figu】res for v//isit/s to the Wiki/pedia 】pages 】of the animals f/eatured in【 the series, he a/nalysed this data to see what, i/f any\, /patter\ns of behav】iour were influenced by watching the show.His rese\】arc【h fo\und /that 【just 6 percent 【of th\e actual programme 【wa【s about envir【onmental issues a】nd/ a m/【er\e 1 【percent of tweets me/ntioned these t\o】pics.【 T\hese figur【e/s/ didn&rs/quo;t/ look promisi\n】g. Docu】mentar】i】es clearly a\ren/&rs】quo】;t/ usel/ess for conservation, howe/ver, as they \al\ter ou【r perception of wi\ldl【if】e in other 【ways. The Wikipedia pages for each of the【\ animals that appe\ared 】\in episodes of Blue Plane/t【 2 had an annual spike】 【/in visits imm【ediat【ely f】】ollowing the【 broadcast of/ the s【how. Ev\e/n this s/mall connection with nature could be enough to create 【an awa/ren/ess crucial to avoiding /【an exti/nction.One of the mos\t successful elem\en/ts of the moder\n nature】 docume/ntary is t\he &ld//quo;ma【king-of&r【dquo; segment. Usually a short section】】 s【eparate【 from the main show t】h\at reveals how/【 s【ome】 of the scenes we】】re shot, the “making-】of&】rdq【uo;\ le【ts us s【ee behind】 the \scenes【.【】 It a\lso helps to break dow/n the】【 i\nvisib【le wall bet/ween the viewer and t】h/e animal】s. “Films show /nat\ure with】out \humans,/ not \as somethi】ng t/o en】gag】e with,【&】rdquo; explains Dr Gouy】on, “【the cameraman can be a role model for ordinary people \and express more emot【ional responses.” It h/elps the audien/ce】, /usu】ally tuc】/ked a/way in their living room in increasing\ly u\rban\ised societies, to engage w\ith a world they hav/e bec】ome】 distant from.D/ocumenting the fut】u/】reEngagem【ent is un【do\u【\btedly the best /way to get us to\ care\ more ab/out the state of the planet. I【f we】/ want】 t\o mak【e film\s mor\e effective in the future, Gouyo】n 【【【s【ugges】ts, we nee/【d to encourage that en\gagement by giving the came【ras to local populations to document their own experience/s. &ld/q】uo;We can’t go by the impe】rialist model of Brito/n’s going\ and watching 】wil\dlife.”Portrayals of enviro】nmental i【ssu【/es can have【 different\ effect\s in diff\erent countr【ies.\UnsplashWe /respond 】far b/etter, \it seems, to films about environm【【ental issues that resonate /with our own \life \experie\n】ce\. \A good exa】/mple of this/ is】 the international re/sponse to the d【ocumentary T/he Co\ve.】 The 2009 Oscar Award/-win/ning piece about do\lphin hunting/ 】in Taiji, Japan cause【d indign/【ant outrag\e amon】g west】ern audien】ces. Its thriller-style tr/e【atment of ‘uncove/ring&【rsquo; the practice using spy-cams didn&/rsquo;t/, however, go down we】ll \with/ audiences in t/he \co/\untr【y【 wh】ere\ it was shot an【d many show【ings/ were met with protests.This k【ind of document/ary c/l/early raises a】wareness but\, with\i\n the communities a】ble to acti\vel/y change pr【actices har\mful to the en/vir\onment it rarely has the same impa】ct. Despite /already 】】having risen to astronomical levels o\f popularit】y, there【 is still a lot of scope for t】h\ese programm】es to do more 【fo/】r conservation. Choos【ing to cha】mpion l\oca/l voices co/uld spell the end for popular ec【o-h/eroes like David Attenborough, but it m【ight【 just 【be the kind of convincing many peop\l/e n【eed to take action on cl/i【ma【te change.Share th/\is article M\ore /from l】ifeHow to become a 【】more sustain\able\ me【at eater

Why I quit my job at Vogue 】to li/ve in a tree for a yea/r

Climate cha【nge【】/ h】a/s played /heavily in 2/019, with activists/ around the/ wor/ld h】olding protests and cal\li\ng on go【vernments t【o make a c【hange. Experts s\ay that the climate emerge】ncy is the most urge】【nt【 /is】sue of o/\u\r time.One organisation, the 【Bari【lla Centre for Food and Nutrition,】 has\ d【【ecided to try】】 and tackle the /proble】m head-on.They say it&rsquo/;s import/ant for t【hem to take a step towards mak/ing an effective c/hange as gre】enhous/e gas emissions creat【ed by】 \food production, distribution and c/onsumption were// &ld【quo;identif\ied 【a/s playing a key role” in the climate\ crisis.This /year 】mar\ks the 10th year that the/ fou【ndation has 】organised /the Inte\rnational \Forum\ on F\oo】d and Nutrition in Milan.The organ】is【ati】on s/ay】【s the forum focusses /on p\romoting drastic change in the mindset of al\l stakeh\olders, whether/ governments, civil society or/ganis】ations, private se】ctor, or research and s/】cience.With 】a thi\rd of CO2 emi\ssions caus】【ed by foo/d p\roduction, the B\arill【a foundation's 'Su-Eatabl】e Li【/fe' p】\roject aims to 【change diets on a large scale.O/ne of the 】expert】s who was at the forum, Ri/cc【ard//o Val】entini, believes/ in o】rder to【 pr【oduce food mor\e sustainably people nee/d to:“【reduce【 their footprint in /terms of/ greenhouse gas emissions, and so to move their diets from unsustainable t/o /more climate-】friendly diets.&rdquo/;Also o】n the agenda was th【【\e Digitising Agrifo【od r/eport, w\hic\h looks at】 new and 】inno/vativ\e ways to prod】uce【 【foo/d in a mo【re environmentall】y friendly way. It involves exploring the potential【 o】f d/igital technol\o\gies to make food produ】ction more sus/tain\able.We spoke 】】to one of the au【tho【rs of the repor】t And【rea Re】nda who explaine】d h【】ow te【】chnology could be u】sed to help tackle the \problem:"【【Puttin\g s\ensors in th/e/ s/o【il and asking t\hose s/ensors to really colle/ct \the i【nforma【tion on whe】n an】d how the】 s/oil should /be \treat/ed, whether the tempera】ture/, whether t\h】e moisture i\s cor【rect, and so【 on/【e can be m\uc【h mo/re surgical in treating\ the soil.”Watch our Spotlight repor/t by O\la】f Bruns for more about what the foundation 】is doing to tackle t】he problem of cli】mate 】change.Share this articleCopy/pas【te the 】article video \em】bed link below:【CopyShar】eT【weetSharesendS】hareTwee】tSharesendM\oreHideSh】areSendShareShare\S\hareSendShar【eShareMore about//SummitFoodEnvironmen\tal protectionMilano 【 【Browse /to【d】a【y's tags

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Watch back: 【Greta T\】hunber\g says /she/】9;s not nervous a/s she gets ready for America【s trip“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207360 \Video: Putting\ marine\ /reso【ur/ces on the ma\p 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsTourism set to bl\oom in Angola’s desert regionTex\【t size\AaAaIn a historic \m】ove for the/ /east A/frican nation, Ethio【p【ia 】has this】 week announced a tree-p/lan】ting/ initia【tive, vi】a/ UN Environment, to outd\o vir【t/ual】ly any/ ot\he【r country in the world. Based /initially at the Gu】le/le Botanical Garden in the capital of Ad/dis Ababa, volunte/ers \be\gan pla】nting 350 million tr\ees 】spanning r\ight across the country. In\ just /12 hours, the world record was broken, in an \ad】m/irable attempt to combat the effects of】 de\fo】restatio】n a/nd cli】【】mate change. By fu【】l/fill\/in【g\ the tree-plantin/g re】cord,/ th【e】 c】ountry is surpassing i/ts Green Legacy goal, 【conceived by Eth】io】】pian】 Pr/ime Minister/ A\】b】iy Ahmed, o/f pla\/nting 2】9;Em【otion【s run】nin/g high&#/039; in Brexit blame g\a\me million tr】ees\ in a day【 at over 1,】000 sites.The /l/ast country \to attempt【 su【c\h a feat was India, who have been reigning\ cha/mpi【on】s since 1 when they planted 49.3 million trees in\ just one【 day, invo【lving 800,000 vo】lunt【eers. Equally, back【 in/ /2018, China announced plans to 【plan\t forests c\overing an area rou【ghly the size of /Ireland and the UK, one of the least\ forested countries】 in Europe \(13% according t【o /Forest R【esearch), spent 】£.7 million to develop a new north】【ern forest 【】in 20【【18. Co\uld the trend o/】f countries competing /\to plant the mo/st saplings be catching on?】E/thiopia's Prime Min/ister Abiy A【hm/ed, A/ugus\t 2019ReutersThe United /Nations En【】vi】ronment】, al\o】\ng with ot\her international organisati【ons, all backe\d the initiati】ve, believing firmly in the /power of tree rest】oration\ in //helpi\n】g to a/bsorb carbon dioxid】e, a m/ajor propell】er\ of global heati\ng./What is Aff【ore【station and /why does it】 help the p】lanet?Tr\ee-planting is called 】afforestation, quite\ simply, the op】posite】 o【【f deforestation. Many studies, 】including o【ne conducted by A/】merica/n scientific journ【al PNAS in 2017\, hav\e document【【\ed /that restoring forest\s in】 their natural f】or\ms is】 \one of, if not the s【in】gle mos】t, efficient an【swer to】 improving global wa\rming.Acco】rdin/g to the UN, f】orest \coverage in Ethiopia has d/eclined drastically since the/ start of the century, reaching a \l】ow of just 4% i】n the early\ 2000s【, /as opposed to 35% 【100 years ago. So, ac/tion had to be take】n to improve 】the /leve\l \of 【e/missions in the atmosph【ere, i/n the】 form of this ambitious】 task.Wh【at h\appen\s is, /trees and vege\tatio\n absorb t\he excess carbon dioxid】e \】we emi\t due \to human a\ctiv【ity with fossil fuel】s,\ meani】n\】g tha\t th\e CO2 c\an be st【ored, and the heat absorbed. In this way, the he\ating of t【he planet【 is lessened and, in turn, the tr【ees he/lp to preserve /the ec【osystems be/neath th/em/【\ and ensure si/gnificant e】nvironme】nta【l benefits/ as a who\le. F/or \instance, en\c/ou\raging rainfall, pr\oviding clean water, r】edu【ci/ng air pol【lution,】 and impr/ov】ing the livelihoods for local peopl\e in s/urr】ounding areas.Nature\ Va【lley\, AfricaJuliette B【iao Koudenoukpo,\ Dir【ector of UN\ Environment&rsq】uo;s Africa Office explain/【s in an official statemen/t:&\ldquo;Afforestation is t\he most ef\fective climate cha】nge 】solution to date a\nd with the ne/w record set by Ethiopia, other African na】\tio】ns should move with speed and chal\lenge the status quo.&【rdquo;“Africa has what 【it take/s to spearhead thi\s glo【bal pu/sh and as the most affected and v【ulnerable c\ontinent, \clim【ate cha/nge miti/gation must 】be \the\ \t/opmost pr/io】rity in the comi【ng da】ys. We at【 UN Environment are taking the lead\ in helping to build capacity 【for\ nations and people to 】ap【ply/ /th\emselves to afforestation and climate chang/\e mitigation strategies.”353,633,6/60 Tree Seedlings Pl】an/ted in 【12 Hours. This【 is/【 i/n /【#Ethiop\iansRegional Shares of T】rees Pla\nted toda\y.#P】MOEthiopi/a#Green】LegacyEthiopiapic.twitter.co】m/2BkTD/tYedC&mdas//h; D【r.-Ing.【 Geta\hun Mekuria (@DrGetahun) July 29, 2019Ultimate\ly, t/he goa\l is f\or 4 b\illion【】 ind】igenous trees to be planted /acr/o/\ss the dr/o】ught-prone nation, rep\orts the BBC, w/hich will make 【an en\ormous difference to t【he】 stability of the【 climate.Share this article More from pla】cesText sizeAa】AaThere/’s a r/ea\son 】car bodywork is often referred to as ‘coachw【o\r/】k’. It】&rsquo】\;s【 beca】u/se the e\arliest cars /were】 litt【le more th/a\n motor/ised】【 version of h\orse【-drawn\ coach【es with passenger compartments usually made from wooden skeletons clothed in more wood, le【ather or fabric.\ \As car】 design moved】 on, s【o did】 the construction /of /their bo【dies to ste/el and aluminium. Now we are seeing a diversificati/on of /materials used to 】skin 】cars to\ maximise their s\/af//et】y and to ensure they /are lightweigh/t as well as】 s/ustainabl/e.Th\【is heralds a period of developme【nt and innova/tion tha【t hasn&\】rsquo;t been seen since the i/nt】roduction of carbo\n fibr/\e to Formu【la/ 1 racing /ca\rs in 1981.】 Bef【ore that, glassfibre was the \oth/er mo【s\t no】teworthy step fo【\r【ward in mat】eria\ls 【when it became a\ pop【ular choice】 fo\r creati【ng/ /【】comple】x shapes in the 】early 1950s for numerous home-bu\il\d specials.Related | Flying/ cars:\ ho】w close are we?Li/gh【twei】【ght \carbon fibreTo】day, the d】\eve】lopment of】 n\ew m【ate\rials is being undert【ak】en in a more structured and scienti\fic man\ner./ This 【i【s cle\ar f【rom 】the approach be【ing tak/en 【to creati/ng \car【【bon fibr】e that’s cheaper and eas【ier to】 produce. Lightweig【ht carbo】n】【 fibre is/ idea【l for man【y】 exterio/r car bod\y par【ts as it can/ be mou\lded into【 multi-contoured shapes easil【y w/hile】 remaining very strong to resist the k【nocks and bump【】s that car【s\ have to endure in normal life.Reducing the cost of maki\ng carb【on fibre also addresses one \of the drawbacks【 of this】 material in the past: 【th】e cost of repairing or repl】acing【 it. For example, fixing\ Ro/w】an Atk\inson】’s McL\aren F1 with \all of its carbon fibre part【s 】is thou/g【ht【 to h】av\e been the largest ever vehicle】 insurance pay-out in UK his\】tory at &po/und;910,000.Wonder/ material from【 recycled c】lo\thi【ng 【Voir\ cett【e public】ation】 sur Instagram】U/ne publication partagée par Faraday Fut\ure \(@fa】radayfutu\re) le 27 /\Juin 2018 &/ag【【rav\/e; 11 :27 PDTToday, we find carbon\ 【fibre in u\se a】cross many\ mainstream cars,/ tho\ugh/ it tends to【 b\e us/ed in str\ategic areas whe\re\ stren】gth and lightweight materi/als【 ar【e cr【uci【al. Using【【 carbon fibre /more widely】 /lowers m/anufacturing costs, which 【is why comp【anies li/ke Fara【da\y F\uture based 【in California, USA are【 wo\r/k】ing on ma/\king th】is wonder m\ater】ial from recycled clothing. By bre\aking th】e materials down\ to t【heir】 /molecular\ 】leve/l】, it&r】squo;s possible to re-\engin/e】er them in】to carbon f】ibr/e.Related |If you c/ou/ld】 fly cl\eanly, would you?R】odrigo Caula/, a \material designer at Faraday, e/xplai【n/s: "【It sou】nds like science fiction\, but it’s happ/】ening now. We can extrude \entirely new bi】o-based fibr/es with special equipment and re-engineer the molecu\lar properti\es of \the sour【ce material \dur/i【ng this proce\ss. /You\ co【uld technic\ally design a fibre to be h\ydrophobic, fire【 retardant or /biodegradable\ – it’s almost alch】】【emy.】"Howeve\r, in/dustry】 anal//ysts 】reckon the average car wil】l only have a 15% carb【/o【n fibr\e content by 2040. The majorit/y \o\f the \】\remaining material w/【ill remain steel, but much of this w】ill be mor】e speciali/sed versions of\ st/eel such as //Ult/ra High】 Strength Steel and boron steel fo【r】 key co/mponents. That’s good for the rig】idity /of/ 【the car and its /c/rash-worth】ines/s, but the more specialised the ste\el, the /more difficult /it becomes 【to recycle.】So, for bodywork, composite materials lik\e carbon fibre rem\ain 【the key to th\e future. While carb【on fibre is \becoming \mo】\r\/e a/fforda【ble and easier to make, there are other co\mposites being develo】ped. Plastic is one of the 【key】s to this【, even if it\ hasn’t had th/e be】st reput/ation d】ue to 】its【 environme】】ntal impact.Rela】ted |Zooming in o/n the future of electric mo【torcyc/lesInte【/rior panels mad】e with p/las\tic w【aste found in the /oceansFaurecia car interiorFaurecia carsFor vehicle use,【 plas\tics are now being develop【ed from the same material that has been t【aken from /wa】ste sources, e\it【her from\ recycled packaging or even extracted from the se】a. BMW has been l/eadi\ng th】e wa【y in this field and its i3 already /has 【interior panels made【 from/ \c/apt【ured plastic waste from the oceans.Exterior body pane//ls a】re also】 being m【ad/e fro/m/ 】/plastic that i/nclu【des 20% hemp fibre. Automotive supplier Faurec/ia 【ha/s been de/】【velopi】ng this f【or so【me time and has/ created a process that allows the plastic t【o be in\jectio】n \moulded so it can form difficult curves while al】so being lighter【 than m\o/st o\ther formed pla/stic panels【.As well as\【 this sort of innovation, more traditional materials are als】o making a co\/meback f】or car bod\ywo\rk.\ A pr】【ime e/xa\mple of this is wood, 】\but not/\/ th】e sort of plank【s a/n\d varnished t】imbers 【of】 old. Instead, wood pulp【 \is bei\ng developed by Toyota becau\se /the finis】h/ed produ/ct/ 【is f\iv/e times stronger than steel yet 80% lighter. This【 has big ramificatio/ns\ as th【e wo】rld moves more toward【s】 electric vehicles with t【heir h\eavy ba【ttery pa\cks w/here wood pulp can help /\offset this \bulk.Aluminium 】is\ another trad【i/tional \mat/erial /that is far from the end of its development fo【r vehicle bo/dy【 panels. Traditionally used f/or lightweight \sports cars, aluminium is now more widely\ used as\ it off【e\r【s】 the same strength as【 s】t】eel for 】much/ /less weight【. That&rs】qu【o;s 【【ideal f\or exterior pa【nels and a【】lum/【inium is al】so easier to/ \work with when 】prod】/ucing panels i\n \bulk quan】titi【es.Re/lated | Meet the leather maker w\ith th\e lowest carbon footprint in the worldL【ooking around all/ of the /major motor shows in recent times, it&rsquo\;s obvi】ous tha【】t car \】make】r【s 【are diversifying their b/ody panel materi【als. For some, environmental im【pact is t\he prime fa【ctor】, but for/ others it】 offe\【rs the chance to pick fr/om a greater choice of materi/als to suit very specific pa【rts【 of a car&\rsquo;s exterior, which almost completes the circle back to the origi】ns of coachbuilding.Words: Al】isda【ir \Su【ttieShare this ar\ticle 】 \ More from life

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【London's \ne】w natur【e res】erve has as mu【ch biodi\v【ersity as 【a rainforestWhen it【 comes to cleaning 【up 】the \Oceans, tec【hn/ology may be good b\ut education is even betterTex/t sizeAaAa】Dutch/ ad/ve\n【tu/rer Wiebe Wakker left the Nether】lands in an\ e】lect】ric car, the \B\lue Bandit\ \on\ the 15th of March 20/1【6 to /complete/【 th/e long/es】t \journey in an ele【ctric car ever【 recorded. His goal /w】as to sp/read /th】e world o/f sustainab/i【lity a\round the wor【ld, w】hile inspire, educat】【e\ an\d accelerate the t【ransition to a z\ero c\arb】on future. A beje/gyzés megt】eki【ntése /az Inst【agramonWiebe Wakker 】/ Plug Me In (@plugmeintravel) &a【ac】ute;【l\tal megosztott bejegyz&\eacute;【s, &A\ac】u\te\/;pr 7., 2019, időpont: 1:24 (\PDT idő\;zóna szerint)To bring about this mission he re【lied on the kindness and help of the p\eop【le around the glob/e, hence his/ in/itiation, called 'Plug Me/【 In', has /bec/ome th/e collaborati/on b\etween p】eople. Eventu】ally,\ those contributing by offering f\ood, accommodation or 】electricity, wer】e the ones choosing /the path that he ha/d to take. Hence,】 he was sent to Ita【ly via】 Germany and Switzerl/a\nd, after that to Sc【a/ndi【navia to eventuall\y \reach the Nort】h Cape and go \back south vi】a Russia, t】h【e Baltic States, Poland【 a【nd U\kraine.】 Followin】g that he hea\de】d to Iran and【 kept goin【g un【til Sydney, Au\stralia/.Cl】ick on th】e video abov【e to learn/ 【more abo\ut this adventure.Share this】 article More from placesIn Pic】tu【res:】 Deforestation in Brazil's rainforest\【 】【is close to five time/s the size of Lon\don\Is o\】cea】n acidification driving e/cos】ystems\ t/o unknown territories?

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In Pic】tu【res:】 Deforestation in Brazil's rainforest\【 】【is close to five time/s the size of Lon\don\Depl\eted f/ish stocks can’t w【ait. The EU and\ Norway need to commit to ending over【fishin【g now 【ǀ ViewEasyjet a】nnounced that /【from Tuesday it w/ill offset carbon emissions from al/l its flights in a bid\ to become the world's fi/rs【t /carbon-neutr【al airline.The \low-cost British carrier said the move will】 cost the company &\pound;25 million (€29.2 milli】on) in the next financial year.But\ \T】ransport and E】nviron】m【ent (T&am/p;E) warne【d carbo\n offsetting \is unlike【ly to deliver 】the emissions re/ductions prom/i/sed.Ea/syJe\t's 】a【nnouncement comes amid pressure for airlines to tackle t\heir \en【vironmental impact and surpasses/ recent 】com\mitments made\ by rival compa】nies.IAG, the owner of British Airways, said it will, f】\rom nex【t year, offset carbon emissions on domestic】 fli【ghts o【nly \while oth\e/r airli【ne】s inclu】d【ing\ Luftha/nsa and Finnair hav\e 】created programmes】 allowing 【cu【stomers to offset part of th】eir flights.Aviation is one of t/he fastest-growi/ng sources of greenhous【e gas emissions. 】Accordin】g to t】he\ Eur\o【pean Commission, direct e\miss/ions from av【iatio\n account for about】 】3% of the EU's total gr】eenhouse 【gas e】missions and mor【e than【 2】% \of g\lobal emissio//ns. It estimate/s t\【hat\ "if 【glo/\】bal aviation】 was a country, it would ra/nk in 【the top 10 emit\/ters".Re】ad mo【【re:/ 'R【】ya【nair i】s the【 new coal' as/ it becomes the first airline i】n EU's top ten biggest pol【lu/t】ersTo achieve its 【targ/et, EasyJet will i\nvest in afforestation — the planting of new trees — as wel【l/ as in the prod\【u/ction of renewable energies.【It also announced a\ joi/nt electric plan】e developme/n/t projec/t with【 Eu【】r】opean manu/\facturer Airbus and said it will c】onti\nue to suppo/rt t【he Amer\ican start【up/ Wrig】ht Electric【 wh/ich ai】ms to \p】roduce an all/-electric plane."The \cost of your flight will not be impac【te【d by our 】e【fforts t【o red/uce carbon emissi【ons and \neither will the performa】nce of t】he 】plan/e itself or y【ou\r ov\era\ll \safety," it said in a sta】tement.H\owever, the/ Bru\ss\els-based 【\T&/amp;E re/search g】roup, sa【id that "stro\nge】r action by governments to tax the cli\mate impact of flying and develop clean fuels" are needed\ to cut t】he se\ctor'\s emission/s.It stressed that ov【er/ 20 】EU st\ates don'/t 【tax international avia/tion at all and that no memb\er s【tate taxes jet fuel."A【irlines paying【 oth\e【rs so【 that they can go】 on polluting is not a sol\utio\【n to a】v【iation’s cl/imate】\ 】problem. /Decades of airlines&r/squo; unch/eck】ed】 e\missio【ns grow/\th show】s gover\nments need to step up and regu/late aviation&rs【quo;s climate impact b/y endi\ng the secto【r&r【squo;s t/ax privil/eges a\nd mandatin/g clea\n\ fu/els," Andrew】 Mu\】rphy, T&【amp;E'/s aviation manag\】er, said in a statement.Sha【r】e this art】icleCopy/p/aste the arti【cle video embe/【d link below:CopyShare/Tweet\SharesendS\hareTweetSharesend【MoreHideShareSendSha】reShareS】ha/】reS\endShar\eShareYou 【mi】ght al】so like 【 \ Sparkle looks to a greene【r future with the opening of】 its fourth \da\ta centre in Greece 】 // 】 】 】 Good che【/mi【s】try: help\【in\g busi/ness to come within REACH rules/ 】 【 】 【 】 \ / Help\ing Balt】ic/ busine\sses to become c【l/eaner and greener /\ 】 】 \ Mo】【re aboutEnvi\ronmen【tEnviro】nmental protectionAirplan【es\ Browse toda】y'】;s tagsCan corals i/n Jordan sa\ve ot【her reefs from g【lobal warming?

4.Text sizeAaA\a&/ldquo;/It’s \unfa【ir t\o say they are jumping 】on t】he ba/n/dw/\agon, 】natur【e documentaries have always \been motivate\d by conse\rvation.” 【Sa【t in his office at University Col】le/ge L/ondon, lec】ture【r in/ sci/ence communication, Dr Jean-Baptiste Gouyon\/ expla】ins to /me \how nature documentaries/ have come \full circle by\ embracing th\【eir roots in envi/ronmentalism.【 In the early days of TV【, he reveals, f\ilms a\bout/ animals\ helped】 to estab【lish th\is brand new medium【 as 【/a source】 of trustworthy informa/tio/n. Docum】enting and catalo【】guing biodiversi】t\y, they told 【timeless stories of 】creatures no\/t s【o dissimilar to u/s.“Befo【\re \Attenborough was Atten/borough, it w/as common to see scientists 【at work,” Gouy/on says, but things began t\o change】/ as the \century wore on. With the i】nc】\reasing doom and gloom of environmen/tal cris/is loo【min【g ov\er the general 【population, film【makers rejec【ted 】stories abou【t wh\at was】 reall】y h\appenin】g to 【th/e pla【net. “\The【re 】was a documented reluctanc【e to eng【age with envi【ronmental is】sues, they d】idn&rsqu\o;/t】 wa\nt to push audiences 】away.”D】avid Attenbo【rough \makes a spee】ch /at /a cerem】on】y f/or \t/he\ naming of the RRS Sir 【D】avid Atte【nboro\ughAsadour Guzelian/ASSO【CIATED 【PRES【\/SAsadour GuzelianDuring the【 1990s, however, things began to change. “A s【hift in the cultural context has happe】ned and t】here is more acceptance \that 【we are in a bad sit\uation.” Having been bombarded with years of ongoing【 catastrophe, pe/o/ple had becom【e too w//】ell informed to keep tolerating a\【 w】a】te\red-down /version of【 the t【ruth. It has beco/me imposs】ible to ignore /he】/ says, “the state of【 the】 \plane/t i【s wh/at /it i【s.&【rdquo;Now 】we&rs】【qu\o】;re hooked. 14.1 million people watched\ the BBC&/rsquo;s【 27 series, Blue Planet II mak\ing it the】 most-watch【ed 】T\V prog】\ramme in Britain that 】year, /a\ccordin\g to the BBC. Natural history】 persona】/\li】ties lik\e David Attenborough have 】bec/ome big 【stars, successfully\ transf】/orming from amateur ecologists to/ folk hero【es for those p】lagued by eco-anxiety. We have beg\un to recognis【\e the p【ower of /t\he e】nvironme/nt/al film and\ its potential make us \think a lot harder a/bout t/ackling proble/ms lik【e plasti】c pollution.Waste from wors】h【i//p: solvin\g Indi\a's unique river pollution p】【roblemWATCH | Shrink【ing pelican b/reeding grounds restored after BP\ 【oil spillSerbia will plant 1 billion tre】e\s\ in【 o【rder to reach net zero t\ar\get by 205【】0The 】power of movi/ng pictu【res“There is no doubt that film as a mediu】m has massive power to elicit/ an emotional rea\ct/ion,】&rdq】uo; says\ Gouyon\, “but there isn’t 】really any】 hard evidence to/ prove this yet.&r】dquo【; More s/o than the\ writt】en w【ord, these documentaries 】seem to pique our interest/ in the\ p/lanet and poten】\ti/ally even d】rive/ 】us to take action. A sur/\vey of U】K superm/arket/ shoppers found th【at 88】 per】ce\//nt o【f people【 who watc】hed Blue Plan】et II\ had \changed their behaviour \as a resul【t.After watching th\e \series\, Da\río Fern&aa\cute;ndez-Bellona, a postdoctoral rese【archer at Univers】ity College 】Cork, noticed th【at th/e programme w】as consistent/ly \tr\ending on twitte/r the evening】 it aire】d. He started to wonder just how much these\ 】docum【entaries are able to affect our behavio\ur. Using 3000Capturing CO2: How to r\educe carbon dioxide emissions from the ceme【nt in】dustr/y twee\ts and figu】res for v//isit/s to the Wiki/pedia 】pages 】of the animals f/eatured in【 the series, he a/nalysed this data to see what, i/f any\, /patter\ns of behav】iour were influenced by watching the show.His rese\】arc【h fo\und /that 【just 6 percent 【of th\e actual programme 【wa【s about envir【onmental issues a】nd/ a m/【er\e 1 【percent of tweets me/ntioned these t\o】pics.【 T\hese figur【e/s/ didn&rs/quo;t/ look promisi\n】g. Docu】mentar】i】es clearly a\ren/&rs】quo】;t/ usel/ess for conservation, howe/ver, as they \al\ter ou【r perception of wi\ldl【if】e in other 【ways. The Wikipedia pages for each of the【\ animals that appe\ared 】\in episodes of Blue Plane/t【 2 had an annual spike】 【/in visits imm【ediat【ely f】】ollowing the【 broadcast of/ the s【how. Ev\e/n this s/mall connection with nature could be enough to create 【an awa/ren/ess crucial to avoiding /【an exti/nction.One of the mos\t successful elem\en/ts of the moder\n nature】 docume/ntary is t\he &ld//quo;ma【king-of&r【dquo; segment. Usually a short section】】 s【eparate【 from the main show t】h\at reveals how/【 s【ome】 of the scenes we】】re shot, the “making-】of&】rdq【uo;\ le【ts us s【ee behind】 the \scenes【.【】 It a\lso helps to break dow/n the】【 i\nvisib【le wall bet/ween the viewer and t】h/e animal】s. “Films show /nat\ure with】out \humans,/ not \as somethi】ng t/o en】gag】e with,【&】rdquo; explains Dr Gouy】on, “【the cameraman can be a role model for ordinary people \and express more emot【ional responses.” It h/elps the audien/ce】, /usu】ally tuc】/ked a/way in their living room in increasing\ly u\rban\ised societies, to engage w\ith a world they hav/e bec】ome】 distant from.D/ocumenting the fut】u/】reEngagem【ent is un【do\u【\btedly the best /way to get us to\ care\ more ab/out the state of the planet. I【f we】/ want】 t\o mak【e film\s mor\e effective in the future, Gouyo】n 【【【s【ugges】ts, we nee/【d to encourage that en\gagement by giving the came【ras to local populations to document their own experience/s. &ld/q】uo;We can’t go by the impe】rialist model of Brito/n’s going\ and watching 】wil\dlife.”Portrayals of enviro】nmental i【ssu【/es can have【 different\ effect\s in diff\erent countr【ies.\UnsplashWe /respond 】far b/etter, \it seems, to films about environm【【ental issues that resonate /with our own \life \experie\n】ce\. \A good exa】/mple of this/ is】 the international re/sponse to the d【ocumentary T/he Co\ve.】 The 2009 Oscar Award/-win/ning piece about do\lphin hunting/ 】in Taiji, Japan cause【d indign/【ant outrag\e amon】g west】ern audien】ces. Its thriller-style tr/e【atment of ‘uncove/ring&【rsquo; the practice using spy-cams didn&/rsquo;t/, however, go down we】ll \with/ audiences in t/he \co/\untr【y【 wh】ere\ it was shot an【d many show【ings/ were met with protests.This k【ind of document/ary c/l/early raises a】wareness but\, with\i\n the communities a】ble to acti\vel/y change pr【actices har\mful to the en/vir\onment it rarely has the same impa】ct. Despite /already 】】having risen to astronomical levels o\f popularit】y, there【 is still a lot of scope for t】h\ese programm】es to do more 【fo/】r conservation. Choos【ing to cha】mpion l\oca/l voices co/uld spell the end for popular ec【o-h/eroes like David Attenborough, but it m【ight【 just 【be the kind of convincing many peop\l/e n【eed to take action on cl/i【ma【te change.Share th/\is article M\ore /from l】ife。

Depl\eted f/ish stocks can’t w【ait. The EU and\ Norway need to commit to ending over【fishin【g now 【ǀ ViewT【ext size】AaAaW】ith a p【icnic packed sa//fe\ly in my bag, awa【y from the enquiring noses of the many dogs I me/t along 【the route, I\ set off ac【ross Far\thing Downs and Happy\ V】alley to \explore the South L/ondon Dow/ns with the promise of a pub at th/e end o/f my 4 km wa【\lk. Almost immediately, I【 had to 【ste】p aside for a/ ra\pidly approaching horse 】and rider as they scrambled up 】the \cha\lk【 emba【nkment. Spr\awlin\g/ vie\ws of forest】s\ and sheep-dot/【ted fields were my reward as I /completed the short walk from Coulsdon S\outh St【ation up/h\ill\ to r【each \th【e top of /Farthing Downs. There is n\o doubt you are still within Gr/eater L】ondon; the rigid archite/ctu/ral figures of the City are a /jarring sigh\t amo\ngst the soft hills that frame /\them. 】It doesn’t feel like it, though, as yo/u de\scend into th】e valley and the nature\ reser【ve/ be/gins to envelop you in its lu【sh remoteness.Takin\g a break in Devilsden Woods&c】【/opy; Helene Je【unet/Eurone/wsWhilst in the process of pla/nning my walk I had discover///ed that this co/llection o】f parks is made up of 】multiple】 S\ites of Spe】cial Sci\】entific In】\tere/st (SSSIs), ext/【remely rare/ 【chalk g\rasslands that can/ be as diverse in species as a r【ainforest. The London Wild】life\ Trust st【ates that, thanks to changes in land use, an estimated 80%】 of th/is habitat has been lost in the/ last 60 ye【ar/s.On the hottest da【y of 2019 so far and just a week befo\re my vi】sit, \a s【peci】al ceremony we\lco【me】d this collecti【on o】f green spaces into London&\rsquo;s col】le】c】tion】 】of NNRs. This【 417-hectar\e area【 is teemi】ng with an a】stonishing quant】ity of species; Natural England's 【Adam Wal/lace/ said at the event that【 "there are/ o/ver 40 species p\e\r\ s】quar【e metre of p【lants that exist on/ this sort of site and/ th【at supports a huge range \【of wildlife."In a】 press release, Nat/ural England highlights that th\is will be Lo\ndon's t\hird reserve, the second lar\gest after Richmon【d Park. \Its】 n\ew sta【tus as an 】NNR helps to 【pre/s\erve o\pportunities for t【h/e /385,0【】00/ res】ide\nts of Croydon to have contact with nature/ and connect on a 【more persona【l level wi】】th a 】wild\er side of Lond\on.It&【rsquo;s not only the/ res【id】en/ts of C/roydon, however, 】tha\t【 will benefit from the protection of th】is【 outdoor sp】a】ce. Just a 30 minute trai【n【\ ride /from Victoria Stat【ion, it al【so】 offers an easy escape\ from t\h\/e stuffiness of Central London.Rel【ated 】| Et/hiopi/a breaks W【orld Record by planting 350 million trees 】in one dayPicnic in Happy Va\lley&c】/opy; Helen J】eunet/EuronewsI sat down to enjoy my picnic on a benc/h surro】unded by this ra】re gra\【ssland, overlooking Happy Valley. On th\e way throug/h【\ /Coulsd】on, I had stopp】ed to see i/f I could find some b\o】ok】s to help with iden/t【ifying 【th】/e 【c\arpet o【f flowers tha】t now \e\n】vel/oped】【 \me and was rewarded with/ some vintage ch\ar【ity sho\p finds. /They ma】\y n/ot have been the most up-to-date/ guides【 but their gorgeous illustrati【ons were almost as captivating】 as the real th】【【ing\. T】he o【ld books【 ca\m【e with the adde/d 【bonus \that, once I was done with 】them, they 】could be donat\ed back to the shop for anot】her explo/rer to enjoy withou】t the waste of buying new.【Secondhand bo】o】\ks including flo【/wer an\d t】r/e】e identifi\cat/ion guides&co\py; Helene \Jeu】net/Eu】ronew/sEven in the middle of a weekday afte/rno\on】, I found people enjoyi\ng 】the reserve \at】 e/very po】int /in my wa/lk. /As I was \t】aking photographs, /one man p【asse\d com\ment /to a couple sat wi//th him, &ldqu】o;ar【en’t】 you/ goin/g to take any to/urist pictures?” It /transpir】\ed that th】ey w/ere visi/ting f\/rom 】Spain, and he】【 ha】d b\【rought them out/ to experience the re【markable pla/ce /in which he li\ved.】More tourists, this time【 an Italian family, s】top】ped to a/llow me to take their pic】t】ure a【s they【 cycled through th\e par\k. On the gras/s a l/ittle【 way ahead/ lay a c】hildren&r】squo;s activi/ty book wi\t//】h the scribbli【ngs of【 an e\/ager insect enthusia/st cove\r\ing 】the pag】e,\ its】 owner 】de\【eply engrossed in the【 identification o【f an uncooperative butterfly several me】tres away【. Outs】i/de of】 your】 usual wal【k\ing】 and】 cycling】 routes, Friends of Farthing Downs lists a considerable number of bridleways/ around thi/s area/ e】ncompassing 】a range of \difficulti/es that offer alt\ernative views o【f the reserve for the keen \equestrian.】Identify flowers amo\ng【 t【he vast wildflower meadows&【cop/y; Helene Jeunet/Euronew】sI/t is th【is /\kind of engag\eme\nt with the env\】iron\ment that Cro//ydon Council, the City/ of【 London C/\orporation and Natural Eng【lan【/d hope will encou【rag】e the 【local p\opu】lation, and t\hose from further afiel【d, to h\e\lp keep this vital natural resource intact. Nature re/】cov】ery is beneficia【l to improving na/tional health \b/ut also as a pot】ential defence against th\e future\ effects of c【limate \chang】e, ac】cording to Tony Juniper head of N】atural England.】Views 【across Happy Valley chalk g/r】asslands&co\p\】y; Helene Jeunet/Euron【ewsR【el\ated | "Love Water" c【a】mpaign t【o enc】ourage Britons to look aft【er /waterwaysCresting another hill, the encroaching 】housing estates signalled that I wa/s 】nearing the end/ of my w\alk. 】In a field just bef\ore the path came 【t/o an e【nd,\ I foun\d volun】teers in the process of h【elpi【ng to r【/estore plant 【【life after years of ove【rgrazing by sheep and \rabbits. I s\】at \and watch】ed /them for a\ while, 【considering how this change in【 status affected the real\ity of the local area’s role f/or】 the community. Turning/ the South L/ondon Downs i【nt】o\ an NNR doesn&r/squ/o;t n/e/cessarily cha【nge an awful lo/t about 【experiences of the area; i【t d【oes】n't add any 】flashy visitor centres o【r adventure playgro【und】\s. What it offers most practically is/ greater, mor】e【 cohesive protection\【 for the fl【ora and\】 f【auna that make it so /unique. In t\urn,【 protected green sp【aces offer chances for 【improved mental and physic【al health in【 local population】s. But what \else?Woodland path/ways of m\any different kinds&/copy\; 】Helen【e 】Jeunet/EuronewsInclusion of another loca/lly import】ant green space int】o the \grou【p of【 2【2 NNR\s that 【e/xist 【\across the\ UK rea/\l【ly se】emed important /as I watched the volunteers. At the ev/ent\ that /declared its new status, Int】erim Chief Execut【ive of Nat/ural E【【ngland【,【 Marian Spain called the ar\ea 'part of【 /a national set of jewels】 i【n】 \the\ c【rown.'N】NRs are \managed by Natural England on beh】alf o/f\ the】 nation, often /by vo\lunteers like those I saw, for the benefit of the】 public.】 They】\ are for all o\f us/ 【【to e\njoy, to bring our】se【lves per/\sonally closer to n【ature an/d perhaps to】 better appreci/ate【【 t【he diverse magnifi/cen】ce【 of /the e/nvironment. It offers /re/】al, material proo\f of\ posit/ive【 environmental impact by hu/mans, pro/【of that we can 【effectively look a【fter the world we live 【in if\ we approach it in small chunks. In the face \of increasi\ngl【y negativ/e n/ews surr/oundi\】ng the climate crisis, t【he 】pr\e【se\r\vation o/f these na\tio\nal】ly im【p】or\/ta/nt 】plac/es】 【】/off【ers a sense of hope. It is an advert fo】r collec【tive action; if /we all 【w【o】rk together/【, things can change for the better.A well】 earned dri】nk【 at The Fox pu】b&co\py;\【 Helene Jeunet【/Euro】newsWi\th a/ happy glow that only a few hours spent outside can bring, 【I rounded】 the f】inal corner to the end of my a\dventu\re, The Fox,【 an 18th century\ 】v\illage pub very m【uch\ a【t home in【 the\ picturesque rural surroundings】 that had so 【absorbed me for th\e la\st【 4 km\. T\he p】ub was anyt\hi】ng but Vic\torian \in its offerings【【 with a vegan menu 】available, something I took full advan【tage of and ordered a dairy\ free\ d\esert to /coo/l【 \me d\own. I retired to the gent】le sun \of t/he busy】 g\/ar【den【, cold drink and coconut ice cream 】in hand, fee/ling tired but】【 satisfied with my Frid\ay【 afternoo\n escape 【from the city.Share this article 】 More from p【lacesClimate cha【nge【】/ h】a/s played /heavily in 2/019, with activists/ around the/ wor/ld h】olding protests and cal\li\ng on go【vernments t【o make a c【hange. Experts s\ay that the climate emerge】ncy is the most urge】【nt【 /is】sue of o/\u\r time.One organisation, the 【Bari【lla Centre for Food and Nutrition,】 has\ d【【ecided to try】】 and tackle the /proble】m head-on.They say it&rsquo/;s import/ant for t【hem to take a step towards mak/ing an effective c/hange as gre】enhous/e gas emissions creat【ed by】 \food production, distribution and c/onsumption were// &ld【quo;identif\ied 【a/s playing a key role” in the climate\ crisis.This /year 】mar\ks the 10th year that the/ fou【ndation has 】organised /the Inte\rnational \Forum\ on F\oo】d and Nutrition in Milan.The organ】is【ati】on s/ay】【s the forum focusses /on p\romoting drastic change in the mindset of al\l stakeh\olders, whether/ governments, civil society or/ganis】ations, private se】ctor, or research and s/】cience.With 】a thi\rd of CO2 emi\ssions caus】【ed by foo/d p\roduction, the B\arill【a foundation's 'Su-Eatabl】e Li【/fe' p】\roject aims to 【change diets on a large scale.O/ne of the 】expert】s who was at the forum, Ri/cc【ard//o Val】entini, believes/ in o】rder to【 pr【oduce food mor\e sustainably people nee/d to:“【reduce【 their footprint in /terms of/ greenhouse gas emissions, and so to move their diets from unsustainable t/o /more climate-】friendly diets.&rdquo/;Also o】n the agenda was th【【\e Digitising Agrifo【od r/eport, w\hic\h looks at】 new and 】inno/vativ\e ways to prod】uce【 【foo/d in a mo【re environmentall】y friendly way. It involves exploring the potential【 o】f d/igital technol\o\gies to make food produ】ction more sus/tain\able.We spoke 】】to one of the au【tho【rs of the repor】t And【rea Re】nda who explaine】d h【】ow te【】chnology could be u】sed to help tackle the \problem:"【【Puttin\g s\ensors in th/e/ s/o【il and asking t\hose s/ensors to really colle/ct \the i【nforma【tion on whe】n an】d how the】 s/oil should /be \treat/ed, whether the tempera】ture/, whether t\h】e moisture i\s cor【rect, and so【 on/【e can be m\uc【h mo/re surgical in treating\ the soil.”Watch our Spotlight repor/t by O\la】f Bruns for more about what the foundation 】is doing to tackle t】he problem of cli】mate 】change.Share this articleCopy/pas【te the 】article video \em】bed link below:【CopyShar】eT【weetSharesendS】hareTwee】tSharesendM\oreHideSh】areSendShareShare\S\hareSendShar【eShareMore about//SummitFoodEnvironmen\tal protectionMilano 【 【Browse /to【d】a【y's tags。环保措施

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